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Full text of "St. Mary's Muse"

Digitized by the Internet Archive 

in 2012 with funding from 

University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill 



http://archive.org/details/stmarysmuse19141915sain 



ST. MARY'S MUSE 



OF 



ST. MARY'S SCHOOL 

RALEIGH, N. G. 



SEPTEMBER 19, 1914 

Saint Mary's School Library 



c 

O God, Holy Ghost, Sanctifier of the faithful, visit, we pray Thee, this 
School with Thy love and favor; enlighten our minds more and more with 
the light of the everlasting Gospel; graft in our hearts a love of the truth; 
increase in us true religion; nourish us with all goodness; and of Thy great 
mercy keep us in the same, O blessed Spirit, whom, with the Father and the 
Son, together, we worship and glorify as one God, world without end. Amen. 



St. Mary's Hymn 



Music by R. Blinn Owen. 



Come one and all, your voices lend, 

In radiant tones our hymn we raise 
To Alma Mater's glory, spend 

Our every effort for her praise. 
With glowing hearts we view these walls, 

To them our girlhood mem'ries cling; 
Yon campus green and well-loved halls, 

To you our grateful hymn we sing. 

Hail, hail, constant, true 
Gleams thy light serene! 

We, thy loving daughters, 
Hail St. Mary's queen! 

Dear Alma Mater, praise we bring 

For friendships nurtured at your side; 
No dearer, sweeter ties will cling 

To any hearts than here abide. 
Inspired by you our thoughts enfold 

A larger aim. In all you've seemed 
To guide our steps, our lives to mold 

To nobler things we had not dreamed. 

Hail, hail, constant, true 
Gleams thy light serene! 

We, thy loving daughters, 
Hail St. Mary's queen! 



ST. MARY'S MUSE 

RALEIGH, N. G. 



Published b#- the Muse Club at St. Mary's School. 
The Student Publication, and the official organ of the Alumnae. 

Margaret H. Bottum, '15 Editor 

Pencie C. Warren, '15 Business Manager 

Vol. XIX. September 19, 1914. No. 1. 

The Senior Class and the Muse Club, in Behalf of the Old Students, 
Wish to Extend a Hearty Welcome to St. Mart's to All the New Girls. 

The Muse which in past years has been the monthly magazine at St. Mary's 
published by the Muse Club is to take a slightly different form this year. It 
is our desire to keep the student life alive with interest and to bring the girls 
closer in the student organizations through everybody knowing just what 
everybody else is doing in all the different activities. 

In behalf of all the St. Mary's girls of today we ask the Alumnae to keep us 
in mind more than ever and let us know about themselves as much as possi- 
ble so that we will feel them an even greater part of the St. Mary's School 
life. 

We are going to publish this paper as often as possible, probably twice a 
month and the regular magazine number will come out four times during the 
school year. 

It is with a feeling of deep regret that we cannot count Miss Walton one 
of our number this year. She has been so unwell the past summer that she 
was not able to return. All of us join in best wishes for Miss Walton's com- 
plete recovery. Miss Hart will have charge of the Infirmary this year. 

We shall also much miss Miss Rowand, Miss McGavock and Miss Isaacs who 
will not return, but it is a pleasure to welcome the two new members of the 
faculty, Miss Barton, the Physical Director, and Miss Seymur, of the Piano 
Department and Miss Urquhart, who comes back to us from Winthrop, is an 
old friend. M. H. B. 



Samt Mary's School Library 
13786 



The St. Mary's Muse. 



What's New to the Old Girls 



Year after year the first question asked by an "Old Girl" is "What's been 
done this summer? Anything new to see?" And something always has been 
done and there is always something new to see. This year the new things 
creep up in almost every spot the "Old Girl" explores. 

Even in the oldest places there are some changes: the front hall — that 
dear old hall which is the despair of the decorator — has lost those ugly 
benches and regained the old prints and the table held sacred by Miss Ann 
Sanders as "Dr. Smedes's" and has taken on a fresher appearance, thanks to 
plants and a few renovations; both dormitories have gained cozy little sitting 
rooms, or rather corners; and the lower hall of East Rock has been so 
painted that the light seems fifty per cent stronger. The Class of 1914 will 
surely hold an indignation meeting at the news that Senior Hall too is fresh 
and bright with wall papers in varied pretty patterns. The walls and furni- 
ture in the Infirmary have been done over so that all there looks very sweet 
and clean. 

The long talked of covered way to the Auditorium is at last complete. Its 
entrance is reached by means of a stairway leading from the first floor of the 
Art Building to the once forbidden and mysterious cellar, and thence the 
covered way leads to the southwest door of the Auditorium. 

The greatest of all changes, however, is the equipment of the Gymnasium. 
This has been the Rector's favorite scheme ever since the big airy room was 
built, and now it is in the process of being carried out. Apparatus extremely 
interesting to the ignorant and no doubt doubly so to initiated has been 
added: a double boom, saddles, a vaulting horse and stall-bars and those of us 
who came early have already measured, weighed and tested various capaci- 
ties by means of the several measuring instruments — the new scales, the 
spirometer and the dyanometer — the one, you know, tests your lung capacity, 
and the second the strength of your grip. So far George Lay is the strongest 
breather and Margaret Bottum the tallest girl and — well, I had better not 
say who is the heaviest. 

Seriously, though, all of us think this equipment of the gymnasium a tre- 
mendous step in advance. Miss Barton is to devote all her time to Physical 
Education, and everybody is to have her physical measurements taken and to 
be given exercises to correct as far as possible physical deficiencies, and 
everybody is certainly going into gymnastic work with new enthusiasm and 
zest so that the St. Mary's girl will gain in erectness, strength and grace. 



There are girls at St. Mary's this year representing fifteen states of the 
Union— Georgia, North Carolina, South Carolina, Florida, Mississippi, Texas, 
Virginia, Alabama, Maryland, New Jersey, Massachusetts, Connecticut, Min- 
nesota, New York and Indiana. 



The St. Mary's Muse. 



The Faculty and Officers of St. Mary's 
1914-1915 

Rev. GEORGE W. LAY Rector 

Miss ELEANOR W. THOMAS Lady Principal 

ERNEST CRUIKSHANK. .Secretary and Business Manager 



The Academic Department 

Rev. GEORGE W. LAY .Bible, Ethics and Pedagogy 

ELEANOR W. THOMAS English and Literature 

WILLIAM E. STONE History and German 

ERNEST CRUIKSHANK. .Psychology and Current History 

MARGARET RICKS Mathematics 

BLANCHE E. SHATTUCK English 

MARIE RUDNICKA French 

HELEN URQUHART Latin 

PRANCES RANNEY BOTTUM Science 

FLORENCE C. DAVIS Elocution 

MABEL H. BARTON Physical Director 

LUCY ELIZABETH ROBINS Preparatory School 

KATE McKIMMON Primary School 

Music Department 

MARTHA A. DOWD, Director J Pian0 ' Theor y. 

I History of Music 

R. BLINN OWEN Organ, In charge of Voice 

NELLY AGATHA PHILLIPS Piano 

BEATRICE MURIEL ABBOTT Violin 

REBECCA HILL SHIELDS Piano 

ZONA MAY SHULL Voice 

EBIE ROBERTS Piano 

LOUISE SEYMOUR Piano 

Art Department 

CLARA I. FENNER, Director (Drawing, Painting, 

[ Design, etc. 

Elocution Department 
FLORENCE C. DAVIS, Director, , .Elocution, Dramatic Art 

Business Department 

LIZZIE H. LEE, Director. ... \ Stenography, Typewriting, 

I Bookkeeping 
JULIET B. SUTTON Assistant 



The St. Mary's Muse. 



Household Arts Department 
HAZEL A. METCALF. Domestic Science, Domestic Art 



LILLIAN FENNER Housekeeper 

ELISE G. STILES Assistant Housekeeper 

ANNA M. HART Matron of the Infirmary 

DR. A. W. KNOX School Physician 

MRS. MARY IREDELL Agent of the Trustees 



Resident Students 1914-'15 

Adams, Mattie Moye Durham, N. C. 

Adkins, Alice Elizabeth Southport, N. 0. 

Aiken, Buford King Brunswick, Ga. 

Alexander, Florence Elsie Asheville, N. C. 

Allen, Virginia Pope Goldsboro, N. G. 

Arbogast, Katherine Hutton Asheville, Nl C. 

Arbogast, Louise Hart Asheville, N. C. 

Bacon, Sarah Shellman Savannah, Ga. 

Badham, Emma Hudgins Edenton, N. C. 

Barbee, Adelyn Andrews Raleigh, N. G. 

Barnes, Naomi Ignatius St. Augustine, Fla. 

Bartholomew, Ruby Lee Gastalia, N. C. 

Barton, Agnes Hyde Hartford, Conn. 

Beattie, Margaret Hayne Greenville, S. G. 

Beatty, Laura L Sucllersville, Md. 

Bleakley, Mary Isabelle Augusta, Ga. 

Blount, Esther J Ay den, N. G. 

Boone, Anna Lewis Macon, Ga. 

Borden, Sarah Elizabeth Goldsboro, N. C. 

Bottum, Margaret Huntington Linville, N. G. 

Bourne, Katherine Wimberly Tarooro, N. G. 

Boykin, Hattie Margaret Wilson, N. G. 

Braxton, Sadie Charles .Kinston, N. G. 

Bray, Violet Marie Try on, N. C. 

Brigham, Helen Savannah, Ga. 

Brinley, Anne Abell Morristown, N. J. 

Brown, Delha Centreville, Md. 

Budd, Annie Lester St. Augustine, Fla. 

Bunn, Lucie Nashville, N. C. 

Burdine, Bessie Anderson Miami, Fla. 

Cameron, Annie Sutton Hillsboro, N. G. 

Campbell, Elizabeth Irene Atlanta, Ga. 



The St. Mary's Muse. 



Cann, Margaret Savannah, Ga. 

Carpenter, Kathleen Lancaster, N. H. 

Carrison, Elizabeth Camden, 8. C. 

Carstarphen, Mary Louise Williamston, N. C. 

Carter, Margaret Robena Washington, N. C. 

Chafer, Aleene Budd Miami, Fla. 

Cheatham, Frances Horn Henderson, N. C. 

Clark, Placide Bridgers Tarooro, N. C. 

Clarke, Florence Middletown, N. C. 

Cobb, Maud Barker Atlanta, Ga. 

Coles, Eliza Pickens Jacksonville, Fla. 

Collier, Carol Gresham Goldsboro, N. C. 

Converse, Annabelle Taldosta, Ga. 

Cook, Mary Elizabeth Tarooro, N. G. 

Copeland, Elizabeth Kinston, N. G. 

Corbitt, Elizabeth Henderson, N. C. 

Cordon, Grace Kipp Lynchburg, Ta. 

Crowther, Courtney DeForest. Savannah, Ga. 

Curry, Helen S Marietta, Ga. 

Davis, Eliza Dickinson Wilmington, N. G. 

Davis, Emily Polk Wilmington, N. C. 

Davis, Emilye Marion Station, Md. 

Dawson, Irma Isabel Ayden, N. G. 

Divine, Blanche Samuel Carter Carters, Ga. 

Dodd, Nellie Agatha Atlanta, Ga. 

Drane, Katherine Parker Edenton, N. C. 

Edwards, Ida Lee Leesburg, Va. 

Erwin, Sarah Lyell West Durham, N. C. 

Fairley, Dorothy Shaw Rockingham, N. C. 

Fairley, Jeannette Rockingham, N. C. 

Floyd, Mary Auning Timmonsville, S. C. 

Freeman, Anna Mae Windsor, N. C. 

Gaither, Nettie Martin Hertford, N. C. 

Galbraith, Selena Emma Waverly Mills, S. C. 

Geitner, Frances Royall Hickory, N. C. 

Gold, Sarah Elizabeth Wilson, N. C. 

Griggs, Margaret Albertson Elizabeth City, N. C. 

Hales, Lanie Stanton Wilson, N. C. 

Hancock, Matilda Jordan New Bern, N. C. 

Hankinson, Leila Augusta, Ga. 

Harding, Rena Brickell Hoyt Washington, N. C. 

Harris, Louise Virginia Roanoke, Va. 

Henry, Dorothy Frances Easton, Md. 

Hill, Marjorie Faison, N. C. 

Holmes, Caroline Asheville, N. C. 

Holmes, Edith Cheesborough Asheville, N. C. 



The St. Mary's Muse. 



Hope, Mildred Isabell Macon, Ga. 

Hughes, Huyla Lee. Elizabeth City, N. C. 

Huske, Margaret Freeman Great Neck, N. Y. 

Jenkins, Elmyra Roanoke Rapids, N. G. 

Jenkins, Frances Easton, Md. 

Jones, Bettie C Henderson, N. G. 

Jones-Williams, Gladys Elizabeth Montevallo, Ala. 

Jordan, Wirt Carrington South Boston, Va. 

Kincaid, Rosalyn M Wilson, N. G. 

King, Anna Belle Louisburg, N. C. 

Lamb, Susan Elizabeth Henderson, N. G. 

Latham, Alice Cohn Plymouth, N. G. 

Lenoir, Sarah Joyce Lenoir, N. C. 

Leslie, Margaret Mulberry, Fla. 

Lewis, Jessie West Point, Va. 

Little, Augusta Wadesboro, N. C. 

Maloney, Ottilie Louise Key West, Fla. 

Mard.re, Clara Urie Windsor, N. G. 

Marriott, Tempe Battle Battleboro, N. C. 

Marshall, Sarah Greenville, S. G. 

Martin, Fannie Biggs Williamston, N. C. 

Mathes, Mildred Aveline Norfolk, Va. 

Meggs, Katherine Jacksonville, Fla. 

Mellichampe, Sudie Stevenson High Point, N. C. 

Montgomery, Kate Lois Spartanburg, S. G. 

Morgan, Henrietta Marshall • Pittsboro, N. G. 

Mott, Ellen Kownslar Dixondale, Va. 

Murphy, Grace Greensboro, Ala. 

Myers, Josephine Macon Charleston, S. C. 

McAlister, Emily Lewis Greenville, S. C. 

McDonald, Anne Kathryn Rockingham, N. C. 

McLaughlin, Martha Robbins Statesville, N. G. 

MacNair, Katherine Wilson, N..C. 

Northcott, Helene Carlton Winton, N. C. 

Parker, Dorothy Shepherd. .' Asheville, N. C. 

Peel, Eva Irene Williamston, N. C. 

Pemberton, Elizabeth Taylor Wilmington, N. C. 

Peoples, Helen Read Townesville, N. C. 

Philbrook, Lulu C Newbury port, Mass. 

Pilkington, Myrtle Hill Pittsboro, N. C. 

Pratt, Agnes Madison, N. C. 

Pugh, Lois Savannah, Ga. 

Pusey, Frances Durham, N. G. 

Ravenel, Estelle Stroyier Valdosta, Ga. 

Reese, Valerie Pensacola, Fla. 

Relyea,' -Eleanor... ./. -. „„-..•.,...' .... . . :\ ... -Washington^D. C. 



The St. Mary's Muse. 



Ricks, Sarah Routh Tarboro, N. C. 

Robert, Susie Corinne Macon, Ga. 

Roberts, Lois Mershon Savannah, Ga. 

Rose, Nellie Cooper Henderson, N. C. 

Rosemond, Sue Gordon Hillsboro, N. C. 

Rouse, Eliza Harper La Grange, N. C, 

Salmon, Frances Louise Lillington, N. 0. 

Sikes, Elizabeth Spencer Monroe, N. C. 

Smith, Ethel Louise Charleston, S. C. 

Smith, Julia Witt Hamlet, N. C. 

Smith, Katherine Clarke Raleigh, N. C. 

Solomons, Marie Katherine Savannah, Ga. 

Sparks, Margaret Hardie Jacksonville, Fla, 

Speight, Alula Julia Edenton, N. C. 

Stammers, Constance Imogen Sea Cliff, N. Y. 

Stallings, Fannie Marie Suffolk, Va. 

Stewart, Kathryne Washington New Bern, N. 0. 

Stigler, Adele Cole Yazoo City, Miss, 

Stiles, Elise Clifford Wheeler, Texas 

Sublett, Judith Eleanor Harrisonburg, Va. 

Thomas, Arabelle Toole Charlotte, N. C. 

Thomas, Margaret May Durham, N. C, 

Thorn, Rubie Logan Kingstree, S. C. 

Tillotson, Frances Marguerite Moorhead, Minn. 

Timberlake, Agnes Cotten Raleigh, N. C. 

Toomer, Dorothy Jacksonville, Fla. 

Vinson, Sadie Walton Littleton, N. C. 

Waring, Cornelia Brewster Bedford Hills, N. Y, 

Waring, Dorothea Bedford Hills, N. Y. 

Warren, Pencie Creecy Edenton, N. C. 

Waters, Emily Charlottesville, Va. 

Watt, Jacksonia Griffin, Ga. 

Welsh, Annie Monroe, N. C. 

West, Marye Virginia Hickory, Va, 

White, Anna Mullen Elizabeth City, N. C. 

White, Marie Louise Salisbury, Md. 

Whitehead, Erma Lee Enfield, N. C, 

Williams, Mary Webber Augusta, Ga. 

Williams, Rita Gay Wilson, N. C. 

Williams, Sarah Elizabeth Newton, N. C. 

Wilson, Alice Corrinne Winston-Salem, N. C. 

Wilson, Josephine Saville Spencer, Va. 

Wright, Helen Cherry Boardman, N. C. 

Saint Mary's ^onooi Library 



The St. Maey's Muse. 



The Student Organizations 

The Junior Auxiliary Chapters are organized under the directien of Miss 
Katie McKimmon. Every girl is a member of a Chapter, determined by the 
location of her room or dormitory. A teacher is elected by the members as 
director of the Chapter, and meetings are held on Sunday nights or as 
otherwise planned. 

The Class Organizations are Senior, Junior, Sophomore, Freshman and 
Preparatory. The classification of all students is determined officially by 
the school. Later, official lists are posted and the classes organize, elect offi- 
cers and plan as far as possible the program for the term. Everybody be- 
longs to a class and everybody joins the organization in anticipation of the 
fun that comes at those now famous Class Parties, and best of all the final 
School Party where you are "out of it" if you are not a member of your 
class organization. Don't be on the fence a second, join when the meeting 
is called. 

There are three Literary Societies, the Sigma Lambda, the Epsilon Alpha 
Pi and the Alpha Rho. Every girl should be a member of one of them and 
enter with the determination to keep the meetings keen with life and interest. 
We are beginning a new year and new work is ahead of us as well as pleas- 
ures, so let's join in making "our" Society the most alive and best attended 
one of all. The meetings are held Tuesday evenings at 7:15 (immediately 
after prayers). 

Athletic Organizatons. There are two Athletic associations, the Sigma 
and the Mu. Membership in these is voluntary but every one is expected to 
belong to one or the other taking part in whichever divisions she is most 
interested: tennis, basketball and walking. The meetings are occasional as 
called by the officers. 

The Dramatic Club is under the direction of Miss Davis, the Elocution 
Director. Those taking elocution and all other students interested in dra- 
matics are invited to volunteer to Miss Davis when a meeting is called. At- 
tendance at the meetings as arranged for work is compulsory. 

The Muse Club is limited in number to twenty-five members mostly Juniors 
and Seniors. The Club maintains the Muse Room for the use of all students. 
There is a magazine rack full of magazines and papers from High Schools 
and Colleges all over the United States. Perhaps your home School paper is 
among them and you are invited to read the magazines at any time you wish. 
The Muse Room is always open afternoons and Sundays. Please do not take 
the books from the room. 



All books, School materials and stationery are to be had at the Post Office. 
Pennants, St. Mary's table covers and pillow tops may be gotten from Pencie 
Warren in the Muse Room. Prices are reasonable. 



Every girl wants her mail just as soon as possible. You know how it is to 
get a letter from home! Stay in single line and don't "fudge." 



Calendar for 1914-15 

1914. 
September 14, Monday Faculty assemble at St. Mary's. 

September 15, Tuesday Registration and Classification of City 

Pupils; New Boarding Pupils report by 
7 p. m. 

September 16, Wednesday ..Preliminary Examinations; Old Boarding 

Pupils report by 7 p. m. : Registration and 
Classification of Boarding Pupils. 

September 17, Thursday Opening service of Advent Term (First 

Half-year) at 9 a. m. 

November 1, Sunday All Saints: Founders' Day. 

November 19, Thursday... Second Quarter begins. 

November 26 Thanksgiving Day. 

December 19— January 5.. Christmas Recess. 

1915. 

January 5, Tuesday All pupils report by 7 p. m. 

January 28, Thursday Easter Term (Second Half-year) begins. 

February 17, Ash Wednesday Lent begins. 

March 18, Thursday ..Last Quarter Begins. 

March 28, Palm Sunday. Annual Visit of the Bishop for Confirma- 
tion. 

April 2, Good Friday Holy Day. 

April 4 _Ea3ter Day. 

May 12, Wednesday Alumnae Day: 73d Anniversary of the 

Founding of St. Mary's. 

May 23— May 25 Commencement Season. 

September 16, Thursday 74th Session Begins. 

No absence from the school is allowed at or near Thanksgiving 
Day, Washington's Birthday, or from Palm Sunday to Easter 
inclusive. The only recess is at Christmas. 



ST. MARY'S MUSE 



OF 



ST. MARY'S SCHOOL 



RALEIGH, N. G. 



OCTOBER 5, 1914 



Alma Mater 

(Tune: "Believe Me if All Those Endearing Young Charms.". 

St. Mary's! wherever thy daughters may be 

They love thy high praises to sing, 
And tell of thy beauties of campus and tree 

Around which sweet memories cling; 
They may wander afar, out of reach of thy name, 

Afar, out of sight of thy grove, 
But the thought of St. Mary's aye kindles a flame 

Of sweet recollections and love. 

Beloved St. Mary's! how great is our debt! 

Thou hast cared for thy daughters full well; 
They can never thy happy instructions forget, 

Nor fail of thy virtues to tell. 
The love that they feel is a heritage pure; 

An experience wholesome and sweet. 
Through fast rolling years it will grow and endure ; 

Be a lamp and a guide to their feet. 

May the future unite all the good of thy past 

With the best that new knowledge can bring. 
Ever onward and upward thy course! To the last 

Be thou steadfast in every good thing. 
Generations to come may thy fair daughters still 

Fondly think on thy halls and thy grove 
And carry thy teachings — o'er woodland and hill — 

Of earnestness, wisdom, and love. 

H. E. H., 1905. 



Some Important Dates in the History 
of St. Mary's 

May 12, 1842 — St. Mary's opened. 

April 25, 1877 — Dr. Aldert Smedes died. 

June, 1879 — The first class "graduated." 

June 5-9, 1892 — Semi-Centennial Celebration. 

May, 1897 — The School passed to the Church. 

February 22, 1899 — Dr. Bennett Smedes died. 

April 3, 1909 — Laying of the cornerstone of the new buildings. 

April 20, 1910 — Centennial Anniversary of the birth of Dr. Aldert Smedes. 



November 1st (All Saints') is regularly observed by the School and the 
Alumnae as "Founders' Day." 
May 12th is kept as "Alumnae Day." 



ST. MARY'S MUSE 

RALEIGH, N. G. 



Published by the Muse Club at St. Mary's School. 
The Student Publication, and the official organ of the Alumnae. 



Margaret H.,Bottum, '15 Editor 

Pencie C. Warren, '15 .-.Business Manager 

Vol. XIX. . October 5, 1914. No. 2. 



We are now well started into the new School year and the days are very 
full. The time that is not occupied with lessons and regular school duties 
is filled with social activities of various sorts. Visiting around the halls, 
dancing in the recreation hour after dinner, and walking, besides trips down 
town, keep us all pretty well occupied in spare time. But no matter how 
busy we may be with different things let us not forget any important thing, 
and let us all join in the many student activities with interest and enthu- 
siasm. The different clubs, especially the State Clubs, the Walking and 
Kodak Clubs and perhaps the Riding Club, if there are enough members to 
make the required number, and the Athletic Associations are to be or- 
ganized soon. 

Please let us have a Thanksgiving Basket Ball game. It means quick and 
lively work for both Sigmas and Mus but everybody is interested. You know 
that the Faculty team may challenge us this year, so look out! 

Even if we can not have Emma Bouknight this year for the Walking Club 
we hope the membership will be large and that many will also belong to the 
Kodak Club. We want to get lots of jolly pictures for our Muse, and the 
Walking Club can help much with its experiences which we well know are 
often worthy of publication. 

Everybody interested in riding will learn the full particulars about the 
Riding Club a little later, but girls, you know there must be at least six to 
ride each Monday that a trip is planned, or we can not keep the Club up. 

We are all glad to welcome the new members into our different Literary 
Societies and it is for each of us to keep "Our Society" ahead of the others 
in interest and good attendance. Each one must do her part and not leave 
it to the others, for each member is an essential part of her Literary 
Society. M. H. B. 



10 The St. Mary's Muse. 



School News 



Sept. 19th: The Reception to the New Girls. 

On the first Saturday night, September 19th, after the arrival of the New 
Girls, a reception was given them by the Old Girls. It was held in the 
Parlor where Progressive Conversation gave every girl a chance for introduc- 
tion to all the other students and to the members of the Faculty. Pretty 
cards were made out for the Progressive Conversation which was so arranged 
that the Old Girls who acted as escorts changed partners at the end of every 
five minutes, when a bell was rung. 

Delicious refreshments of orange-ice and cakes were served in the Muse 
Room which was effectively decorated for the occasion with ferns and flowers. 
Everyone registered in the St. Mary's Book which is kept from year to year 
for the Opening Reception. It was with a feeling of loss that the Old Girls 
could not see many dear familiar names in this year's registration. 

The evening was closed by an informal dance in the parlor and everyone 
left with the happy feeling which one of the New Girls expressed: "Why, 
I know everybody! and I hardly knew my room-mates before." 

Sept. 23rd: Thursday Night Talk. 
Ihe first of the weekly "Thursday Talks" was made on the 23rd by Mr. 
Lay. After speaking of the most important regulations necessary in the 
school life, he emphasized the importance of taking care of one's health, 
laying stress on the benefit of erect carriage to health and to good looks. 

Sept. 26th: The Alpha Rho Reception. 

On Saturday night, September the 26th, the Alpha Rho Literary Society 
gave the annual reception in honor of its new members. The reception was 
held in the Muse Room which was attractively decorated for the occasion 
with ferns and the Society pennants and banners. Besides the members of 
the Alpha Rho Society, the officers of the other Societies and the Faculty and 
the Seniors were present. 

Delicious refreshments of salad and ice cream and cake were served while 
many toasts were offered around the punch bowl to the success of the Society. 
Attractive tiny red lobsters and crabs at the side of the salad plates were 
given as favors. The evening passed all too quickly, and all united in ex- 
pressons of pleasure to Miss Matilda Hancock, the President of the Alpha 
Rho Society who acted as chief hostess. 

Sept. 28th: First Faculty Recital. 
The first of the series of Faculty Recitals of the year was given Monday 
evening, September 28th, by Misses Shull, Abbott and Seymour. The follow- 
ing program was rendered: 

I. 

(a) Gavotte in E major Bach 

( b ) Novellette in E major Schumann 



The St. Mary's Muse. 11 



II. 

"Aria" from "Herodiade" Massenet 

"II est doux, il est bon" 

III. 

(a) Chant Negre A. Walter Kramer 

(6) Les Parfadets Pente 

IV. 
Etude in D flat major Liszt 

V 

(a) Spring Rapture Strickland 

(6) "Bring Her Again, O Western Wind" Landon-Ronald 

(c) Before the Dawn Oscar Meyer 

VI. 
Rondo Capriccioso Saint-Saens 

VII. 

Ave Maria (Meditation from "Thais") Massenet 

Violin Obligato 

Miss Shull, who is well known in Raleigh, sang with her usual ease and 
brilliancy. She responded to an enthusiastic recall with Spross's charming 
'Will 0' the Wisp." Miss Abbott's violin numbers were rendered with intelli- 
gence and good phrasing. Miss Seymour, the new member of the musical 
faculty, played with faultless technique and was warmly greeted. 

The concert was delightful throughout and was attended by a large and 
appreciative audience. N. A. P. 

First Meetings of the Literary Societies 

The Literary Societies held the first formal meetings on Tuesday night, 
September 29th. 

The Alpha Rho Literary Society met in the French Room to welcome back 
the old members and to extend to the new ones a very cordial welcome. 
After the new members were sworn in, a very interesting program was 
carried out and the by-laws read. There being no further business the meet- 
ing was adjourned. 

The Sigma Lambda Society held a most successful meeting in the History 
Room and received its new members, who show great promise to help in 
carrying on the work and ambitions of the Society. The History of the 
Society and the life of Sidney Lanier, whose name the Society bears, were 
read. One of his famous poems was read in conclusion and the meeting, 
which seemed to have been enjoyed by all, was adjourned. 

The Epsilon Alpha Pi Society met as usual in the English Room in the 
Art Building. The President, Miss Agnes Barton, extended a cordial wel- 
come to all. The new members were then taken in with the oath of alle- 
giance and a delightful program followed. The history and purpose of the 
Society were read and the life of Edgar Allen Poe, after whom the Society 
was named, was given. In conclusion a selection from his works was read. 

M. B. 



12 The St. Mary's Muse. 



Old Friends 

Each year brings its inevitable changes but the "old girl" of this year 
seems to feel a special void in the absence of those three old and familiar 
friends — Miss Walton, Mr Hodgson and Mr. Harrison. 

Miss Walton, in her capacity of Matron of the Infirmary, has been able to 
comfort and cheer many a St. Mary's girl at times when comfort and cheer 
were most acceptable and won a warm place in the hearts of many. Herself a 
St. Mary's girl of the '60s, she took up her duties in the Infirmary in 1901, 
and not only was one of the oldest members of the Faculty in point of 
service but was second to none in affection for and devotion to her Alma 
Mater. She had richly earned the right to retire but it is a source of deep 
regret that ill health should compel this retirement, especially this session 
when the Infirmary is looking so well with its newly decorated interior, an 
improvement on which she had much set her heart. Miss Walton is now 
living at her home, "Brookwood," just outside of Morganton, where one of 
her brothers and her sister, Miss Louise Walton, another St. Mary's girl, also 
have their home. 

Mr. Hodgson, who has had charge of the School pianos for many years 
and in connection with his work with them, has spent each year a number 
of weeks in the family during his quarterly visits, had had a longer con- 
tinuous connection with St. Mary's than any person connected with the 
School, except "Miss Katie." As last year's Seniors put it in dedicating to 
him the 1914 Annual, he has been "for more than thirty years entertainer, 
adviser and friend of St. Mary's girls," and is "the composer of the school 
song and of many class songs." He has done much, both in advice and by 
contribution, to make the annual Muses a success, and generation after 
generation of St. Mary's girls have felt it a treat to know him. He too feels 
now that he has earned the right to retire and in lightening his work he gives 
up his duties here, though we hcpe to continue to see him, and in his songs he 
will be long rembered. Mr. Hodgson, who is the brother of Mrs. Frances 
Hodgson-Burnett and the father of "Little Lord Fauntleroy," has his home 
in Norfolk. 

Mr. Harrison, who had been engineer in charge of the Laundry and Steam 
Plant the past six years, in addition to his particular duties had found such a 
multitude of ways in which to add to the little comforts of St. Mary's life 
and was always so ready to do any favor in his power that it is hard to 
accustom ourselves to his non-appearance, though it would be selfish of us 
not .to wish him well in the promotion which takes him from St. Mary's to 
a position in the city. 



The St. Mary's Muse. 



13 



Local Enrollment, 1914-15 



Academic Department. 



Bonner, Virginia Lucile 
Chester, Arlene 
Clarke, Florence 
Edwards, Margaret Alice 
Polk, Bessie McMorine 
Guirkin, Chloe Mary 
Hughes, Martha Elizabeth 
Hughes, Katherine Dorothy 
Lay, Elizabeth Atkinson 
Lay, Ellen Booth 
Linehan, Marie Dorothea 
Mann, Edna Earle 
Mann, Edith Matilda 
Mann, Margaret Emma 
Manning, Julia Cain 
Merritt, Emma Louise 



McCulloch, Maude 
Newsom, Margaret 
Riddick, Lillian Ivy. 
Sears, Prances McKee 
Smith, Leah Marion 
Smith, Lillian Murray 
Snow, Helen Caroline 
Spencer, Alma Louise 
Stone, Florence Douglas 
Strong, Frances Lambert 
Telfair, Elizabeth Alexander 
Thornburgh, Allene Estelle 
Till, Jessie Freda 
Walker, Elizabeth LeGrand 
Williamson, Gladys Mial 
Yates, Gladys Eccles 
Yates, Mildred Johns 



Business Department. 
Alston, Mary Blanche Beckwith, Chloe 

Anderson, Mildred McKee Blue, Lottie Bell 

Baker, Rebecca Marion Jeffreys, Grace Joyce 

Jordan, Julia Graham Kaplan, Eva 



Barber, Harriet Atkinson 
Blacknall, Ella Taylor 
Cross, Elizabeth Murray 
Hill, Randolph Isabel 



Preparatory "A." 

Hoke, Mary McKee 
Lay, Anna Rogers 
Linehan, Susan Eugenia 
Royster, Virginia Page 
Shepherd, Lillias 



Loicer Preparatory. 



Baker, Elizabeth Whitehead 
Baker, Katherine Haywood 
Browne, Cicely Cushman 
Cameron, Sallie 
Ellington, Josephine Woollcott 



II. 



Johnson, Charlotte Elizabeth 
Lay, Lucy FitzHugh 
Robbins, Roella 
Staudt, Janie Helen 
Woollcott, Elizabeth Brydon 



Bcylston, Adelaide Snow 
Morgan, Mary Strange 



Raney, Margaret Denson 
Rosenthal, Corrinne Frances 



14 The St. Maky's Muse. 



Primary. 

Barber, Elizabeth Swann Jones, Isabel Hay 

Benson, Sarah Lay, Virginia Harrison 

Halstead., Phyllis Mary Pendleton, Sylbert 

Howard, Borothy Louise Williams, Evelyn Ivy 

Yates, Mary Elizabeth. 

Special. 

Bowen, Anne Goulder Jones, Willa Gladys 

Bowen, Eunice Woodward Keyes, Anna Rose 

Bowen, Isabel Worth Lasater, Hattie May 

Chamberlain, Melissa E. Moore, Albertine Crudup 

Cheshire, Mr. Godfrey Nelson, Charlotte Ruth 

Giersch, Alice May Oldham, Eula Ruth 

Griffith, Mr. Wm. B. Robbins, Mr. Edwin E. 

Guirkin, Alice Florence Seymore, Swannie 

Guirkin, Mary Clark Wood, Caro 



Wood, Virginia Franklin 



With the Girls of Last Year 

Etta Burt and Martha Johnson, of course, head the news with their adven- 
ture in matrimony. Etta Burt became Mrs. J. K. Warren on June 20th, and 
Martha Johnson became Mrs. M. A. Newman on June 29th. 

Among the St. Mary's girls who have this year entered other schools are 
Miriam Reynolds, who takes up the A. B. course at Agnes Scott College; 
Anne Mitchell who will take the regular course at Winthrop College; Ade- 
laide Parker who enters St. Mary's Hall, Burlington, N. J.; Ellen Childs 
who returns to the College for Women, and Margaret Beattie who will be a 
non-resident student at Greenville Female College (S. C). 

Borothy Budge is having a 'rare experience this winter. After spending 
the summer at their summer home at Wakefield, R. I., with her father, 
mother and younger sister, they started the middle of August for a trans- 
continental automobile trip. They will reach California by easy stages in 
October and spend the winter there, returning after the Exposition next 
summer. When last heard from here they were about to cross the Great 
Desert. 

Eliza Skinner and Martha Wright are kept out of school this session by 
illness. Both are much disappointed. Eliza Skinner hoped till the last to 
be able to return and graduate but following her physician's advice she will 
spend the year in rest instead. Martha Wright hoped to take her Piano 
Certificate but by the doctor's advice will postpone it a year, resting in the 
meantime. 



The St. Maby's Muse. 15 



With the Class of 1914 

Of course their friends are very much interested in the start which the 
members of the Class of 1914 have made in putting their St. Mary's training 
I into practice. "We hope to do them more honor later but must confine our- 
I selves here to a brief mention of each. 

Julia Allen and Melba McCullers continue in school. Julia Allen has 
entered Randolph-Macon Woman's College at Lynchburg and hopes to gradu- 
ate there in two years. She stopped at St. Mary's on her way to Randolph- 
Macon to enter her sister, Virginia, here. Melba McCullers has entered 
Barnard College, Columbia University, as a special student in English, and 
is looking forward to a fine year in New York. 

Sophronia and Julia Cooper, Sallie Heyward, Josephine and Mary Clark 
Smith, and Myrtle Warren are teaching. Sophronia Cooper, did good work 

I at the University Summer School at Chapel Hill, where she was Circulation 
Manager of the Summer School Weekly, and is now teaching in the High 

: School Department of the Oxford Schools. Julia Cooper is doing mission 
school teaching at Valle Crucis, in the District of Asheville, where her aunt, 
Miss Mary E. Horner, is principal. Sallie Heyward is principal of the two- 
room school at Cleonta, S. C. ; Josephine Smith is teaching in the grades and 
also teaching music at Beaufort, N. C. ; Mary Clark Smith is at Lawrence, 
N. C, and Myrtle Warren, last but not least, has department work in the 
Weldon (N. C.) High School. 

Grace Crews entered her probationer's training for nursing at the Chil- 
dren's Hospital in Washington, D. C, in June. She has now passed her 
examinations and been accepted as a regular candidate. 

Laura Clark, throughout the summer put her training in stenography to 
practical use and is acceptably filling a regular position this fall in her 
home town, Scotland Neck. 

Emma Bouknight was to have spent the year abroad but her plans were 
i necessarily suspended. 

Laura Margaret Hoppe, Susie Mclver, Kate Hale Silver, Mary Tyson, and 
Nellie Wood as yet lend themselves to home and the social life of their 
home towns. 

All are missed at St. Mary's and all we are sure are, especially this month, 
missing St. Mary's. 



16 The St. Majby's Muse. 



Alumnae Weddings 

Among the Alumnae marriages of the summer have been the following: 

Zollicoffer — Bencini: On Wednesday, June 3rd, in New York City, Miss 
Robah Kerner Bencini (S.M.S., 1909-11), of High Point, N. C, to Mr. Dallas 
Bancroft Zollicoffer, Jr. 

Lord — Parker: On Wednesday, June 3rd, at the home of the bride, 
Princeton, N. J., Miss Catherine de Rosset Parker (S.M.S., 1907-11) to Mr. 
John Bright Lord. 

Stancell — Gilbert: On Wednesday, June 3rd, at the home of the bride, 
Lo Lo, Montana, Miss Fredrika May Gilbert (S.M.S., 1910-11) to Dr. William 
Wiley Stancell, of Raleigh. Dr. and Mrs. Stancell are at home at the State 
Hospital where Dr. Stancell is Assistant Superintendent. 

Harding — Bragaw: On Wednesday, June 3rd, in St. _ Peter's Church, 
Washington, N. Cr, r Miss Katherine Masters Blount Bragaw (S.M.S., 1910-11) 
to Mr. Edmund Hoyt Harding, of Washington, N. C. 

Crook — Green: On Wednesday, June 17th, at the country home of the 
bride, "Elk Hill," Va., Miss Millian Cooke Green (S.M.S., 1909-11), of Denver, 
Col., and Dr. Jere Lawrence Crook. 

Warren — Burt: On Saturday, June 20th, at the home of the bride, Trenton, 
N. C, Miss Etta Rollins Burt (S.M.S., 1911-14) to Mr. Julien Knox Warren, 
also of Trenton. 

Neioman — Johnson: On Monday, June 29th, at the home of the bride, 
Smithfield, Va., Miss Martha Watson Johnson (S.M.S., 1913-14) to Dr. Myron 
Albert Newman, of Norfolk, Va. 

Johnson — White: On Monday, July 6th, at the country home of the bride, 
"Primrose Hill," Saluda, N. C, Miss Mary Dell White (S.M.S., 1909-10), of 
Jacksonville, Fla., and Mr. William Henry Johnson, of the same city. 

Laiorence — Lewis: On Wednesday, July 29th, at the home of the bride, 
Statesville, N. C, Miss Flora Lewis (S.M.S., 1912-13) to Dr. Elmo Nathaniel 
Lawrence. 



Daily Routine at St. Mary's 
1914-15 

Sundays : 

7:30 " Rising Bell. 

7:50 a. m. Early Communion (voluntary, 2nd, 4th and 5th Sundays). 

8:30 " Breakfast. 

10:00 " Sunday Class. 

11:00 " Morning Service. 

1:00 p. m. Dinner. 

3:30 — 4:30. Quiet Hour ("Meditation Hour"). 

5:00 p. m. Evening Service. 

5:50 " Supper. 

9:30 " Light Bell. 

Mondays : 

7:00 a. m. Rising Bell. 

7:30 " Breakfast, followed by Prayers and Assembly. 

10:00—11:00. Special Study Hour ("Detention Hour"). 

10:00—12:30. Shopping Hours. 

1:00 p. m. Lunch. 

6:30 " Dinner. 

7:00 " Chapel. 

7:30—8:00. Recreation (in Parlor). 

8:00—9:30. Study Hour. 

10:00 p. m. Light Bell. 




Rising Bell. 

Breakfast. 

Study. 

Chapel, followed by Assembly. 

Recitations and Study. 

Lunch. 

Recitations and Study. 

Exercise, Laboratory, etc. 

Dinner. 

Evening Chapel (Prayers on Tuesdays and Thursdays). 

(Tuesdays: Literary Society Meetings after Prayers.) 

(Thursdays: "Thursday Talks" in School Room after 

Prayers. ) 
Study Hour. 

(Saturdays: Recreation and Calling Hour.) 
Light Bell. 



J 




ST. MARY'S MUSE 



OF 



ST. MARY'S SCHOOL 



RALEIGH, N. G. 




OCTOBER 31, 1914 



Hail, St. Mary's 



In a grove of stately oak trees, 

Where the sunlight lies, 
Stands St. Mary's true and noble, 
'Neath the Southern skies. 

Far and wide, oh sound her praises, 

Chorus full and free, 
Hail, St. Mary's, Alma Mater, 

Hail, all hail to thee! 

Well we love the little chapel,, 

Ever hold it dear; 
Hear the echoes of the music, 

Rising soft and clear. 

Far and wide, etc. 

There the ivy and the roses 

Climb the old stone wall, 
There the sweet, enticing bird-notes 

Sound their magic call. 
Far and wide, etc. 



And the bonds of friendship strengthen 

As her beauties charm, 
We draw close to Alma Mater, 

Trust her guiding arm. 
Far and wide, etc. 



ST. MARY'S MUSE 

RALEIGH, N. G. 



Published by the Muse Club at St. Mary's School. 
The Student Publication, and the official organ of the Alumnae. 




JARET 
JIE C. 


H. Bottum, '15. 




















. .Business Manaaer 
















Vol. 


XIX 




October 31, 


1914. 






No. 3. 



Madamoiselle's Interesting Trip From Paris 
During the Mobilization 



Mademoiselle Rudnicka has been in charge of the French Department at 
St. Mary's since 1912. She is herself from Paris, ivhere her family are now 
living. Her three nephews have already seen hard service in the French 
lines, whence they write interesting letters. Madamoiselle had no passport, 
and when on her trip back to America she was called on to prove her Amer- 
ican residence, she did so by means of the "St. Mary's Blue Book" of 1914 
in which is given her Raleigh address. 

To spend my vacation at home is of course my dearest pleasure and it 
was so again this year when I left St. Mary's for Paris, until the terrible 
war broke out. 

We knew that Germany had always been watching an opportunity for war 
and had been preparing for it for years. We had already avoided it several 
times. We had alliances with powerful countries and we thought and hoped 
that she would realize that such a conflict would bring slaughter, and that 
her Christian and humane feelings would be blighted in consequence of such 
a scourge. 

Servia was the match that set Europe on fire. Should Russia in order to 
help Servia take the offensive, we would not be driven into it; but if Ger- 
many should declare war on Russia, we would have to go — Oh! what anxious 
moments we passed during these days of waiting! 

We did not want war! war belongs to the past. War among civilized na- 
tions is annihilation of civilization, and Prance always has been at the head 



18 The St. Maey's Muse. 



of civilization. War is no longer the ideal of our writers; they have other 
ideals. 

Then news after news came, and both the mediation from Sir Edward 
Grey and even a promising answer from the Emperor of Austria failed. Ger- 
many sent an ultimatum to Russia, and then an ultimatum to Prance. War 
was declared. France knew her duty, and so did her sons. 

Mobilization being started, all men from twenty-two to forty-seven years 
old had to leave home at once. Days and nights trains took them to the 
front. In Paris, mothers, wives, children, fiancees were accompanying their 
beloved ones to the station by the thousands. How cruel was that parting! 
Under their courage and bravery, what a sorrow to the inmost of the souls 
of these French women. Then women and girls rushed to be accepted for 
the Red Cross, but they were too many and too many untrained, and all 
could not be taken. The Lady Principal of a college in Paris having been 
appointed to form a section of Red Cross volunteers chose from among her 
pupils those who had been studying English or German so that they could 
bring some comfort to the wounded or the dying in sending home for them 
a last adieu or reading for them a letter long looked for. 

Paris was then another Paris. Few automobiles could be seen in the 
streets and there were no more autobuses, horses or delivery wagons. They 
had been put into requisition by the government. On account of lack of trans- 
portation, food became scarce, cafes were closed at 9 p. m. and theaters and 
concerts did not open their doors. 

Thousands of foreigners attempted to leave Paris and reach England 
through Havre, the only port open on the English Channel at this time. This 
could be done only after innumerable regulations and wordless fatigue. The 
trip from Paris to Havre which takes usually three hours could not be made 
in less than fourteen hours, and what a trip! No food could be had on the 
way, and travellers, soldiers, and prisoners were all mingled together. 

The prisoners who were on the train on my way back were German spies 
dressed in French uniforms. The journey on the ocean was very perilous. 
Mines had been placed at the mouth of the English Channel and German 
cruisers were trying to capture French and English steamers. We had to 
stop several times. The boat was crowded from top to bottom, people slept 
everywhere, on deck, in the dining room, music room, etc. Our state room 
was turned into a drying place. We had to tax our ingenuity to set our wits 
to work to appear decent, as only one hand bag was allowed to be taken and 
no trunks. 

Le Havre, where we were kept until the sea was safe, presented the most 
impressive aspect. French troops meeting English soldiers who were land- 
ing every day, Canadians arriving also and met by both English and French, 
all seemed determined and confident, marched by the streets among throngs 
of people whose enthusiastic songs and cheers could never be forgotten. 
England and France had been for centuries strong enemies but the desire for 
higher ambition, the progress of civilization, the same desire for peace could 
be contained in two words, "L'entente Cordiale" and may these two nations 



The St. Maky's Muse. 19 



in a common effort and as a reward for their great sacrifice bring peace and 
concord forever. 

Then we went on and reached New York, all feeling the strain which had 
been upon us. Happy were those who were Home again. A letter from Mr. 
Lay was waiting for me telling me to come and rest at St. Mary's, where a 
warm welcome from all was given to the Refugee. 



In Memoriam 

MRS. LAURA BAKER DOWD 

At her residence, in West Raleigh during the evening of October 3d, in 
her seventy-eighth year, Mrs. Laura Baker Dowd, mother of our Music Di- 
rector, Miss Martha A. Dowd, passed peacefully into the rest of Paradise. 

St. Mary's through the Muse extends to Miss Dowd deepest sypmpathy in 
this her irreparable loss. 



We were very glad to welcome back among us this week one of the very 
dearest members of St. Mary's, Elizabeth Tarry, who visited Helen Peoples 
for a few days. Elizabeth with her guitar in the midst of a crowd singing 
the "old songs" and the School songs reminded many of us old girls of other 
happy evenings of the years when she was one of us. 



School News 

Oct. 3d: The Sigma Lambda Reception. 

The Sigma Lambda Literary Society gave its annual reception in honor 
of its new members on the evening of October 3d, in the Muse room. The 
room and hall were very effectively decorated with masses of golden rod 
and fern which made a very pretty background for other decorations in the 
Society's colors. The officers of the Society received, and gave a very cordial 
welcome to the new members, and other guests. 

Delicious refreshments of salad, ice cream and cake were served, the fa- 
vors being tiny hand painted flags of the different nations at war. Punch 
was also served. The evening closed all too soon and everyone left with 
regret. 

Oct. 6th: The Inter-Society Meeting. 

The first of the inter-society meetings was held in the parlor on the even- 
ing of October the 6th, with Miss Lanie Hales presiding. The meeting was 
well attended by both the Faculty and the girls. The following program was 
rendered: 

"Die Wacht Am Rhine" By the German Classes 

"The Position of Servia and Belgium in the War" By Eliza Davis 



20 The St. Maey's Muse. 



"The Outbreak of Hostilities" By Elsie Alexander 

"La Marseillaise" Sung by the French Classes 

"Latest News of the War" By Lois Pugh 

Poem, "Waterloo" Read by Elizabeth Carrison 

At the opening chords of the Marseillaise everyone rose involuntarily and 
remained standing during the remainder of the song which was certainly 
sung with much spirit. The program was concluded by our own national 
hymn "America." M. A. F. 

Oct. 8: "Thursday Talk. 

"The time has come," the walrus said, 
"To speak of many things, 
Of ships and shoes and sealing wax, 
Of cabbages and kings." 

Miss Thomas began her talk on Thursday night with this familiar jingle, 
and it turned out that the "ships and shoes" — when dramatically reproduced 
by Miss Thomas made us "see ourselves as others see us." The girls' con- 
tinued enthusiastic applause showed their keen appreciation of the talk, and 
each one felt a determination to put those gentle reminders into action. 

M. A. F. 

Oct. 10th: The Rector at Hillsboro. 

The Rector has just returned from Hillsboro where he attended the Ral- 
eigh Convocation. On Sunday he gave us an outline of the work discussed 
during this, meeting. He was very much impressed by the reports on Mis- 
sions and gave us some very interesting accounts of the work being done in 
small rural communities. He favored the plan of assigning to different ones 
a definite portion of work to be done, and hopes to introduce a similar sys- 
tem here at St. Mary's. M. A. F. 

Oct 10th: The Epsilon Alpha Pi Reception. 

On Saturday night, October 10th, the Epsilon Alpha Pi gave the annual 
reception in honor of its new members. The Muse Room was beautifully 
decorated in golden rod and evergreens which carried out the Society's col- 
ors very effectively. The officers of the Society acted as hostesses and wel- 
comed the new members, the Faculty, the officers of the other two Societies, 
and the Seniors. 

Delicious refreshments of salad, ice cream and cake were then served by 
the old members of the Society, while the punch bowl was a popular feature 
during the whole evening. The favors, little Black Cats tied with green and 
gold ribbon were unique reminders of the story by Edgar Allan Poe for 
whom the Society was named. The evening passed all top quickly and on 
leaving the guests expressed their pleasure to Miss Agnes Barton, the Presi- 
dent, in having had a very delightful time, C. C. 



The St. Maey's Muse. 21 



Oct. 16th: Peace-St. Mary's Concert Series. Jennie Dufau, Prima Donna 
Coloratura Soprano Chicago-Philadelphia Grand Opera Co., St. Mary's Audi- 
torium, Friday, October 16th, 8:30 P. M. 

We read this notice on the bulletin board every day for a week, without 
tho slightest realization of what it was to mean to us. For how could we 
know, that Jenny Dufau with her beautiful art and vivid personal charm, 
would take the audience by storm and give us one of the most delightful 
evenings ever spent at St. Mary's. Miss Dufau seemed to sing with as lit- 
tle effort as a bird or a mountain stream, and her moods are as "Variable as 
the shade, by the light quivering aspen made." But there is something 
more — deep down there is a throbbing heart. 

We shall not forget her rendering of "Solvejg's Song" with its plaintive 
melodies speaking of loneliness and faith and patient heartache; nor of the 
"Wiegenlied" with its caressing tenderness. There were five encores and 
when the "down town" part of the audience went home, the girls crowded 
around her on the stage and begged for "just one more" which she graciously 
gave. 

Miss Dufau was dressed in the peasant Sunday costume of her native Alsa- 
tian village, as her wardrobe was lost in Europe this summer. Indeed her 
home and all personal belongings were sacrificed in the war, and her aged 
father, her sister and herself narrowly escaped being shot as spies. 

PROGRAM. 

I. (a) Quel ruscelletto P. D. Paradies 

(Z>) Odorava 1' April A. Parelli 

(c) Dites que faut-il faire Air du XVIII siecle 

II. Air from "Barber of Seville" Rossini 

IIx. (a) Pilles de Cadix L. Delibes 

(6) Chanson de Solvejg Grieg 

(c) Wiegenlied • Humperdinck 

(d) Und Niemand hat's gesehn C. Loewe 

IV. Valse from "Juliette et Romeo" Gounod 

V. (a) Irish Love Song M. Ruthven Lang 

(6) The Leaves of the Wind Leoni 

(c) Cradle Song L. Carrier Worrell 

(d) The Charm of Spring R. C. Clark 



22 The St. Mary's Muse. 



Alumnae Weddings 



Bayley — Gray: On Tuesday, July 21st, in Raleigh, N. C, Miss Caro Gray 
(S. M. S., 1904-'05) to Mr. Eldon Dicus Bayley. 

Simpson — Moore: On Thursday, October 1st, at Cedar Mountain, S. C, Miss 
Cordelia Moore (S. M. S., 1913-'14) to Mr. Joseph Nardin Simpson. 

Stewart-Thompson: On Wednesday, October 14th, in Baltimore, Md., Miss 
Marguerite Vertner Thompson, '08 (S. M. S., 1906-'08), to Mr. Warren Adams 
Stewart. 

Cork— Ruff : On Wednesday, October 21st, in Ridgeway, S. C, Miss Harriet 
Elizabeth Ruff, '06 (S. M. S., 1902-'06), to Mr. Travis Coleman Cork. 

Lester— Bur foot: On Saturday, October 24th, in Elizabeth City, N. C, Miss 
Ada Aydlett Burfoot (S. M. S., 1910-'ll) to Dr. William Evans Lester. 

Bowden — Bruce: On Wednesday, October 28th, in Portsmouth, Va., Miss 
Katherine Marsden Bruce (S. M. S., 1910-'ll) to Mr. Henry Bowden. 

We have already had several visits from the girls of the Class of '14, and 
hope to see many more in the near future. Laura Clark has promised us a 
visit, which we hope she will make good. Melba McCullers has been with 
us twice and we were all glad to see her well and strong again and able to 
go to Barnard in good health. As you know Julia Allen made us a nice visit 
on her way to Randolph-Macon. Kate Hale Silver, just her same old self, 
drops in every once in a while to remind us of old times. 

Evelyn Maxwell came a few days ago for a brief stay and we have had a 
few scant glimpses of Patsy Smith, who is, of course, having a "good time," 
now that she is out of school. 



Our Exchanges 

It will be a great pleasure to welcome back among our Exchanges the old 
friends of last year. We hope that they will not be long in coming to replace 
the Commencement numbers which now fill the racks. We wish all the 
Editors the very best of success in their year's work with the magazines and 
papers. Especially do we wish to encourage our "new" friend, "The Watch;' 
of Porter Military Academy, on its way to a second year of success. 

Our present exchange list includes the following magazines: The Acorn, 
Meredith College; The Chronicle, Clemson College; The College of Charles- 
ton Magazine; College Message, Greensboro Normal College; Davidson College 
Magazine; Erothesian, Lander College; Focus, G. F. C, Greensboro; Folio, 
Flushing High School, N. Y.; Furman Echo, Furman University; Enterprise, 
Raleigh High School; Hollins Magazine; Horae Scholasticae, St. Paul's 
School, Concord, N. H.; Lenoirian, Lenoir College; Maryland Collegian, Mary- 
land College; Mercerian, Mercer University; Messenger, Durham High 
School; Monthly Chronicle, Episcopal High School, Alexandria, Va.; Oracle, 



The St. Mary's Muse. 23 



Duval High School; Oracle, Woodberry Forest School; Pine and Thistle, 
Southern Presbyterian College; Quill, Staten Island Academy; Radiant, At- 
lantic Christian College; Red and White, A. & M. C; Round Up, Douglas 
High School, Douglas, Wyoming; Sage, Greensboro High School; State Nor- 
mal Magazine, N. C; Stetson Weekly Collegiate, DeLand, Fla.; Talisman, 
Florida College for Women, Tallahassee; Taps, Fishburne Military Academy; 
Tileston Topics, Wilmington High School; University of North Carolina 
Magazine, Chapel Hill; Wake Forest Student, Wake Forest, N. C; Wes- 
leyan, Wesleyan College, Ga. ; Western Maryland College Monthly; Winthrop 
College Journal; Wofford College Journal; High School Echo, Waynesville, 
N. C; Tit-Bits, St. Timothy's School, Catonsville, Md.; Athenian, New Bern 
High School; Bugle Call, Columbia Military Academy, Columbia, Tenn.; 
The Watch, Porter Military Academy; Vail Deane Budget, Elizabeth, N. J.; 
Deaf Carolinian, School for Deaf, Morganton, N. C. 



J 



Joax 

It really makes me smile 

So wonderful the treat, 
To see an athlete run a mile 

And only move two feet. — Ex. 

"There's one sign that should be placed over every letter box in the city." 
"What is that?" 
"Post no bills." — Ex. 

IMMORTAL LINES. 

A fly and a flea in a flue 
Were imprisoned — and what could they do? 

Said the fly, "Let us flee!" 

Said the flea, "Let us fly!" 

So they flew through a flaw in the flue. — Ex. 

i 
First Fresh. — Ain't ye got no brains? 

Second Fresh. — I ain't said I ain't." 

First Fresh. — I ain't ast you is you ain't; I ast you is you? — Ex. 

No matter what trouble Adam had, 

No man could make him sore, 
By saying when he told a joke, 

"Why, I've heard that joke before!" — Ex. 

Prof. — Why were the Middle Ages so dark? 

Bright Student — Because there were so many knights. — Ex. 



"The rain falls on the just and the unjust fellers, but chiefly on the just 
because the unjust have the justs' umbrellers." — Ex. 



I 



24 



The St. Maby's Muse. 



Our Advertisers 



Boylan-Pearce Co., Dry Goods. 
J. C. Brantley, Druggist. 
Dobbin-Ferrall Co., Dry Goods. 
Edwards & Broughton Printing Co. 
Norfolk Southern Railroad. 
M. Rosenthal & Co., Grocers. 
The Tyree Studio. 

Atlantic Fire Insurance Co. 

Carolina Power & Light Co. 

King-Crowell Drug Store. 

King's Grocery, "The Little Store." 

The Fashion, Kaplan Bros. Co. 

French Hat Shop. 

Jolly & Wynne Jewelry Co. 

H. Mahler's Sons, Jewelry. 

The Office Stationery Co. 

Royall & Borden Furniture Co. 

Raleigh Department Store. 

Southern Educational Bureau. 

L. Schwartz, Meat Market. 

Taylor Furnishing Co. 

White's Ice Cream Co. 

Young & Hughes, Plumbers. 

C. D. Arthur, Fish Market 

T. W. Blake, Jeweler. 

Thos. H. Briggs & Sons, Hardware. 

California Fruit Store. 



Bernard L. Crocker, Shoes. 
Ellington Art Store. 
S. Glass, Dry Goods. 
C. E. Hartge, Architect. 
Hick's Up-town Drug Store. 
Hunter-Rand Co., Dry Goods. 
Johnson & Johnson Co., Coal. 
Johnson & McCullers, Grocers. 
O'Quinn, Florist. 
Thomas A. Partin Co. 
H. Steinmetz, Florist. 
Toyland Company. 
Wake Drug Store. 
Walk-Over Shoe Shop. 

T. F. Brockwell, Locksmith. 
Cardwell & O'Kelly, Cleaners. 
Darnell & Thomas, Music House. 
Hayes & Hall, Photographers. 
Heller's Shoe Store. 
Hotel Giersch. 
Pescud's Book Store. 
Raleigh Floral Company. 
Raleigh French Dry Cleaning Co. 
Misses Reese & Co., Milliners. 
Herbert Rosenthal, Shoes. 
Royster's Candy Store. 
Watson's Picture & Art Co. 



These advertisements will be put in full in the magazine number of the 

Muse. 



CALENDAR FOR OCTOBER 

October 3, Saturday Sigma Lambda Reception 

October 6, Tuesday First Inter-Society Meeting 

October 10, Saturday F. A. P. Reception 

October 16, Friday Peace-St. Mary's Concert 

October 21, 22, Wednesday, Thursday North Carolina State Fair 

October 24, Saturday Seniors entertain the Sophomore Class 

and the Juniors, the Freshman Class 
October 31, Saturday Hallowe'en 



ATHLETICS FOR NOVEMBER 

Basketball. 

November 2, Monday Inter-Association Contest 

November 6, Friday 

First game between the first teams of the Sigmas and Mus 

Tennis. 

November 5, Thursday Entries received for Tennis Tournament 

November 6, Friday Schedule for Tennis Tournament posted 

November 9, Monday First Tennis Game played 



St. Mary's Down in Dixie 

(Tune: "Dixie") 

Down in the South in the land of cotton, 
Dear old school not a bit forgotten, 

Hooray, hooray, hooray, hooray! 
For St. Mary's dear we'll never fear, 
The thought of her brings only cheer, 

Hooray, hooray, hooray, for dear 
St. Mary's! 

St. Mary's, yes, great place for schoolin', 
Where you work and play and do some foolin' 
Hooray, hooray, hooray, hooray! 
Chorus. 

B. A. P.'s or Sigma Lambda's, 
Alpha Rho's or Namby-Pamba's, 

Hooray, hooray, hooray, hooray! 
Chorus. 

We're sometimes Sigma's, sometimes Mu'ses, 
Whatever we are you'll please excuse us, 
Hooray, hooray, hooray, hooray! 
Chorus. 



ST. MARY'S MUSE 



OF 



ST. MARY'S SCHOOL 



RALEIGH, N. C. 



■ 




NOVEMBER 16, 1914 



Hallowe'en 

11:00 A. M. 
She's just a plain St. Mary's girl, 

A dainty little maid, 
Who hates to get the fatal "slip" 

And loves a serenade. 

8:30 P. M. 
But now she is a powdered dame 

With gems and rare old lace, 
Whose sweeping train is managed 

With dexterity and grace. 

Or now she is a fearful "spook," 

Who -moves in solemn gloom ; 
And now an old and wrinkled witch, 

A-riding on a broom. 

With clumping sabots now she comes, 

A Dutch girl "just too cute"; 
Nor does she fear the Indian brave 

That's in such hot pursuit. 

She turns now to the happy days 

Of childhood, free from care; 
A little girl, with flowing curls, 

She hugs her Teddy Bear. 

Now quite demure she "tells her beads," 

And counts them one by one; 
Absorbed in meditation deep, 

A sweet and pious nun. 

She now appears a Puritan, 

In simplest fashion dressed; 
And now, with clanking spurs, she comes 

Straight from the "wild, wild West." 

And now a sporty college chap 

With trousers rolled just right, 
And now a little "nigger gal" 

With "pig-tails" plaited tight. 

10:00 P. M. 
Oh yes, she can be all these things, 

But at the stroke of ten 
You'll see, if you're observant, 
Just the same sweet girl again. 

Nell Battle Lewis. 





ST. MARY'S MUSE 

RALEIGH, N. G. 



Published by the Muse Club at St. Mary's School. 
The Student Publication, and the official organ of the Alumnae. 

Maegaeet H. Bottum, '15 Editor 

Pencie C. Waeben, '15 Business Manager 



Vol. XIX. 



November 16, 1914. 



No. 4. 



What Dame Fate Showed Betty 



It was the last night of October in '64. Already cold weather had set in, 
bringing with it the rich red and brown leaves of autumn, and sharp, keen 
winds. The approach of winter brought additional anxiety to many hearts 
already troubled, for the war then going on had drained many of their 
resources. 

Among those who had suffered were the Carvels, but trouble was not 
marked on the faces of the group seated around the blazing fire in the old 
Carvel home on this October night. Colonel Carvel and Robert were with 
Lee's army and only Mrs. Carvel and the eighteen-year-old Betty were at 
home. Janet Fiske and Ellen Bacon had come over to spend the week-end 
with Betty, and in spite of the pressure of hard times and the war, the 
three girls kept the house merry. 

Tonight, as they sat with their knitting, Janet suddenly said: "Tonight is 
Hallowe'en, and we have done nothing to celebrate. Why not try our for- 
tunes, or do something of the kind?" 

"Splendid!" exclaimed the other two, and Ellen immediately proposed that 
at twelve o'clock one of them should sit before a mirror holding, a candle 
and eating an apple. As the clock struck the hour the future husband should 



26 The St. Majry's Muse. 



look over the girl's shoulder and she would see him in the mirror. This 
was agreed and they sat waiting until almost twelve o'clock. But when it 
was to be decided who should be the one to tempt fate, neither Ellen nor 
Janet was brave enough to go alone to the old summer house where the plan 
was to be carried out. 

Finally, Betty resolutely took up a candle and declared her intention of 
going. She went to the kitchen, where she procured an apple, and then hur- 
ried out through the front hall. Once outside, alone in the dark, she rather 
regretted her decision, but would not return to the house now to be ridiculed, 
and bravely set out for the summer house. 

She had waited but a few moments when the big clock in the hall struck 
twelve. Betty counted the strokes with a beating heart. She held the candle 
close to the mirror and peered through the dim light, trying to discern some 
reflection. Suddenly her heart almost stopped beating. Was that a step 
behind her or was it only her excited imagination — she uttered a scream; 
just at that moment a gust of wind blew her candle out. She had caught a 
glimpse of a face in the mirror — the face of a man and of a stranger. 

"Pardon me," said a voice quietly from the darkness behind her. "I 
fear I have frightened you, though I assure you that I had no intention of 
doing so." 

"Who are you?" gasped Betty, torn between a desire to run and an impulse 
to stay and learn the stranger's identity. 

"I am a Union soldier," said the man. "I have been wounded. The army 
passed within a few miles of here today and as I was too weak to go on I' 
stopped here." 

"You are not a deserter, are you?" queried Betty, and even in her fright 
she managed to make her voice seem quite stern. 

"If you have a match I will relight your candle, and you may see whether 
I look like a deserter or not," said the soldier. 

Here he was seized with a violent fit of coughing, and Betty hastily relit 
the candle. 

"Why did not you tell me you were so badly wounded?" 
All Betty's fear was forgotten now in her distress at the man's plight. The 
candle had revealed an injured arm roughly bound in a bloody bandage. 

Betty ran to the house and brought her mother, and together they helped 
the exhausted soldier in and onto a couch. 

Fever set in and it was many days before he knew anything of his sur- 
roundings. Mrs. Carvel nursed him carefully and after a few weeks he was 
able to get around. 

Many happy days of comradeship followed between Betty and the soldier 
who had given his name as Richard Brewster. Betty read to the convalescent 
and he in turn told her of his home and his people, until she learned to love 
them all and put aside her natural prejudice against the North. 

When Richard Brewster left for the field again, several weeks later, he 
carried away two things. The first was a little knot of ribbon which had 
dropped from Betty's dress on that memorable Hallowe'en night, and the 



The St. Mary's Muse. 27 



other was a promise from Betty Carvel that when the war between the 
States was over she would take the name of Brewster on the very next 
Hallowe'en night. Mary A. Floyd, '16. 



The Hallowe'en Party 



Never has the annual Hallowe'en party been more enjoyed than the one 
this year. Many and varied costumes were to be seen during the progress 
of the Grand March which opened the evening. The Seniors represented the 
Faculty so admirably that it was not until one peeped under the masks that 
one could recognize these awe-inspiring ladies and gentlemen. The Scare- 
crow needed only a corn-field to make itself quite complete, while the "Buy- 
a-Bales" called forth much laughter in their awkward attempts to keep in 
line, with signs out "10c. a lb." 

"A Trip Through Hell" aroused much curiosity, and, from all accounts, it 
fulfilled the highest expectations of all who undertook the journey. 

During the evening candy, popcorn and apples were passed around. Almost 
before we realized trfat the evening had begun the lights flashed and we 
had to leave the enchanted gym and return to the everyday-world. 

M. A. F. 



School News 

Oct. 21-22: The Fair. 

We did not mind going to school at all on Monday because, just think! 
we were going to have two whole days free, Wednesday and Thursday. What 
a time we had, too, both those days! Our holiday really began Tuesday night 
because we did not have study hall. All Wednesday morning we sat in the 
grove and watched the crowds pass. 

The girls who were lucky enough to have relatives or parents come to 
take them out were allowed to leave the School Tuesday afternoon and not 
return until Thursday afternoon. 

We had an early lunch on Wednesday and left for the Fair about one 
o'clock. All those who have ever been to the State Fair know just what 
a good time we had. Simply busy every minute looking at the exhibits, 
buying salads and sandwiches and joining in the general fun of the crowd. 
Of course we all brought balloons back to those who could not go. 

Wednesday night those who were fortunate enough entertained visitors 
while the others danced. 

Thursday we rested, reading or sewing out in the grove until time for 
evening study hour when we resumed our regular duties though it was hard 
to realize that the Fair was over. L. S. H. 






28 The St. Maey's Muse. 



Our Art Exhibit at the Fair. 

The art department of St. Mary's had an exhibit at the State Fair and 
took seven blue ribbons, which denote first prizes in each department which 
was entered for competition. 

Lottie Lee Meares, a Saturday pupil, got one for her original design for 
a sofa cushion top; Elizabeth Hughes, for an original design for wall paper; 
Annie Cameron, for her drawings from casts; Elizabeth Lay, for an original 
outdoor sketch in water colors, and Nettie Gaither for a still-life group 
in oils, "Two Skulls and Empty Water," known in the studio as "Dead 
Men." Miss Fenner did a head of Cicely Brown in clay and cast it in 
plaster wbich received a premium. 

Altogether we think the exhibit was a credit to St. Mary's and it received 
many favorable comments from the judges and from others interested in 
the development of art and the thorough foundation given by the School 
in this work. 

Oct. 24th: The Junior-Freshman Party. 

On the evening of Saturday, October the twenty-fourth, the Junior Class 
entertained their sister class, the Freshmen. A series of progressive 
games furnished lively amusement, which was heightened by the- Faculty 
being assigned to a table of "Up Jinks." A pretty feature was the presenta- 
tion to the Class of 1918 of the colors of the Class of 1914. 

Dainty refreshments of" ice cream and cake completed a delightful evening. 

E. D. D. 
Oct. 24th: The Senior-Sophomore Party. 

On the evening of October 24th the Seniors entertained the Sophomore 
Class in the Muse Room. The party was given in the form of an old-fash- 
ioned country gathering and the room was decorated for the occasion with 
tall corn and golden-rod. 

But why call it just a party? The Seniors in the garb of old-fashioned 
countrymen and the Sophomores as old-fashioned countrywomen really eloped 
together into the festivities of the countryfolk world. What fun it was when 
Miss Mirandy and Jeremiah led the stately Virginia Reel in a most unstately 
manner while the crowd patted time. How realistic were the old gossips, to 
whose remarks the tassels of corn solemnly nodded with horror! And how 
ardent the wooing of lads and lassies amidst the golden-rod. 

Peanuts and popcorn were passed around during the games, hot chocolate, 
ham sandwiches and pickles composed the main refreshments, and last and 
best of all a large box of candy from Mr. Cruikshank in Baltimore who 
we regretted could not be with us but whose kind thoughts we certainly 
appreciated. 

Oct. 29th: Thursday Talk. 

On October 29th, our usual Thursday talk was given by Mr. Willis G. Briggs. 
Naturally we expected that Mr. Briggs would tell us something about the 
postoffice, but his chosen subject with which he showed remarkable famil- 



The St. Mary's Muse. 29 



iarity was no less interesting. He told us clearly and briefly of the Historical 
roots of the present European struggle, brightening his narrative with 
descriptions of great persons and of romantic scenes in modern European 
History. The continued applause showed the appreciation of his audience. 

F. R. B. 
Nov. 3d: Founders' Day. Inter-Society Meeting. 

As Founders' Day, the first of November, fell on Sunday this year, jt was 
commemorated Tuesday night, November 3d, by an Inter-Society meeting 
in the parlor. The most important number of the program was that given by 
Miss Katie, partly told from personal experience and partly read from articles 
written of the Founders of the School. This talk was greatly appreciated 
by the girls who felt themselves drawn nearer to those noble characters 
described by one always so greatly loved and admired. We would readily 
recognize that Miss Katie was a friend and follower of those with whose 
nobleness she acquainted us. 

The other numbers of the program were as follows: 

Founders' Day — Its Meaning Bessie Burdine, 

Extract from Bishop Strange's Address on Dr. Aldert Smedes, 

Lanie Hales, , , 
"The Confirmation Class" Picture, and the Portrait of , 

Bishop Ravenscroft Margaret Bottum. , . 

Centennial Poem -. , Katherine Bourne. 

The program was concluded by the singing of the Alma Mater. 

s. m 

Nov. IftTi: Mr. and Mrs. Lay Entertain the Faculty. 

On Wednesday afternoon of November the fourth, Mr. and Mrs. Lay enter- 
tained the Faculty on the lawn at the Rectory from 4 o'clock to 6. Delicious 
grape-fruit, salad and home-made candy were served and Miss Clara Fenner 
helped at the punchbowl. A delightful afternoon was spent by all. . [ 

Nov. J{th: A Party to the Seniors. 

The Seniors were informally and delightfully entertained on Wednesday 
night, November 4th, in Miss Roberts' room by Miss Roberts and Miss Ricks. 
The time was spent in eating apples and "home made" popcorn while sitting 
on the floor in a circle laughing and talking and forgetting a while our 
Senior dignity. At ten o'clock the party was obliged to break up but not 
without regrets on the part of the guests, who had spent a very happy 
evening. S. V. 

Nov. 5th: Thursday Talk. 

On Thursday evening, November 5th, Chief Farmer of the Raleigh Fire 
Department came up to the School, we hoped, to give a talk on protection 
against fire and methods to be used in case of a fire, but finding himself, in 
dealing with this subject, better qualified for action than words he asked 






30 The St. Maey's Muse. 



Mr. Lay to speak for him. The talk was very instructive and our curiosity 
was well satisfied in regard to the use of the various fire extinguishers found 
about the buildings. 

Nov. 1th: The Carnival. 

One of the most delightful entertainments we have had this year was the 
Carnival last Saturday night, given in the "Old Dining-room." On one side 
of the room the splendor of the eruption of Vesuvius was proclaimed; on 
the other two famous dancers attracted attention, while at another place two 
chefs in cap and apron insisted that the crowd buy "Hot Dogs"! There 
was a real ice cream parlor, lighted with Japanese lanterns and brightened 
with banks of autumn leaves. Alexander's Rag Time Band, led by J. O. 
Wilson, afforded much pleasure and amusement and together with the "Proc- 
tor and Keith Vaudeville, right from New York," made the hit of the 
evening. M. A. F. 

Athletics at St. Mary's 

Athletics at St. Mary's for this school year have had a fine beginning. 
The enthusiasm of the contestants and their able rooters at the first athletic 
contest of the season was well manifested. 

Now, with at least two basketball teams from the Sigma association and 
two from the Mu and the prospect of a tennis tournament, surely the spirit 
of athletics is well roused. 

No healthy girl, and what girl at St. Mary's does not call herself healthy, 
should be content until she has taken part in some game or athletic contest. 
When she has once experienced the thrills and joys which fill her as she adds 
even one point to the score for which she and her team-mates are so ear- 
nestly striving, she will never again be content to stand on the side lines. 

Let me quote what the captain of the Varsity basketball team of Radcliffe 
College thinks about basketball: "It mentally invites keen concentration of 
the mind, socially, fosters a deep feeling of friendship, educationally quickens 
the intellect, and physically, promotes the development of the body." That 
this may be said of all athletics is of course understood. In what better 
way could you wish to spend two or three afternoons each week? 

The foundation training of the girl who becomes popular in games and 
contests is in her regular gymnasium work. The girl who, although natur- 
ally awkward or delicate, will put energy and enthusiasm into her physical 
training, will soon find that she has been training her body and mind, 
unconsciously, to do those things which she has never really expected of 
herself but which she has admired in others. 

Why is it that within the last ten years athletics have become so much 
more popular in colleges and schools for girls? One reason is that it has 
been found that girls as well as boys need athletics to give to them the 
true sense of fair play and the thought for others which has to be developed 
in us. 

Every girl needs this training in working with others and the cultivation 



The St. Mary's Muse. 



31 



of the true spirit of sportsmanship and fair play. The place where she will 
get it is in the sports of her school, so let this be an invitation to every girl 
at St. Mary's to come out for athletics. Mabel H. Bakton. 

November 2d: Athletic Contest. 

On Monday afternoon, November the first, the first athletic contest was 
held between the Sigmas and the Mus. Good work was done on both sides. 
The Mus won over the Sigmas by a score of 153 to 105. 



Mu. 

Score. 

1. Dumb-bell Race 25 

2. Basketball Distance Throwing 50 

3. "Last Man Hit" 28 

4. Throwing for Goal 50 

5. Relay Race 



Sigma. 

Score. 

1. Dumb-bell Race 15 

2. Ball Distance Throwing 

3. "Last Man Hit" 40 

4. Throwing for Goal 

5. Relay Race 50 



Final score 153 



Final score 105 



Alumnae Weddings 



Biggs — Fagan: On Wednesday, October 7th, at Edenton, N. C., Miss 
Annie Fagan (S.M.S., 1911-'12) to Samuel Romulus Biggs. 

Crowder— Walters: On Wednesday, October 7th, at the First Baptist 
Church, Raleigh, N. C, Miss Frances Macon Walters (S.M.S., 1912-'13) to 
Mr. Ralph Haywood Crowder. 

Nelson — Harris: On Saturday, October 10th, at St. Thomas's Church, 
Reidsville, N. C, Miss Lady Olive Harris (S.M.S., 1909-'10) to Mr. Harris 
Morehead Nelson. 

White — deRosset: On Wednesday, October 14th, at The Maples, Fayette- 
ville, N. C, Miss Anita deRosset (S.M.S., 1898-'99) to Mr. Justin Smith White. 

Mr. and Mrs. White will be at home after November 15th, at 625 Haymount 
street, Fayetteville, N. C. 

Hall — McGwigan: On Wednesday, November 4th, at the Church of the 
Advent, Enfield, N. C, Miss Sadiebelle McGwigan (S.M.S., 1905-'06) to Mr. 
John Denby Hall. 

Shellman — Reese: On Wednesday, November 11th, at Christ Church, Sa- 
vannah, Ga., Miss Agnes Reese (S.M.S., 1910-'ll) to Mr. William Feay Shell- 
man. 

Coan— Wiggins: On Saturday, November 14th, at Winston-Salem, N. C, 
Miss Mary Elizabeth Wiggins (S.M.S., 1906-'07) to Mr. George William Coan. 



32 The St. Maey's Muse. 



The following clipping will be of interest to the St. Mary's friends of 
Pleasant Stcvall of Savannah, Ga., who we remember was at St. Mary's in 
1911-'12: 

To Exter Red Cross Work. 

Miss Pleasant Stovall, daughter of the United States Minister at Berne, is 
now studying to prepare herself for Red Cross work in Europe. She will 
probably go to Geneva for her examination and desires to go to the front. 



Me 'n U 



I know a teacher and a girl 

Who fuss from morn' till night 
Because E. dotes on oxygen 

And he likes rooms air-tight. 

Mr. S.: "Miss B., can you answer the question?" 

"Miss C?" 

(Getting desperate) : "Miss— er— ANYBODY." 

A. B. (timidly, looking around) : "I don't believe she is here today." 

"What do babies cry about?" 
"About all night." 

Old Girl: "Why don't you come on to Assembly?" 
New Girl: "I'm going* to the Infirmity." 

New Girl: "Miss Thomas, will you please come across the hall and call 
us in time for breakfast?" 

Miss S , softly: "Lanie, are you asleep?" 

Lanie: "Yes'm." 

New Girl: "What time is intention class on Monday for those who don't 
learn their expression lesson?" 



Our Advertisers 



Boylan-Pearce Co., Dry Goods. 
J. C. Brantley, Druggist. 
Dobbin-Ferrall Co., Dry Goods. 
Edwards & Broughton Printing Co. 
Norfolk Southern Railroad. 
M. Rosenthal & Co., Grocers. 
The Tyree Studio. 

*B .• 

m 

Atlantic Fire Insurance Co. 

Carolina Power & Light Co. 

King-Crowell Drug Store. 

King's Grocery, "The Little Store." 

The Fashion, Kaplan Bros. Co. 

French Hat Shop. 

Jolly & Wynne Jewelry Co. 

H. Mahler's Sons, Jewelry. 

The Office Stationery Co. 

Royall & Borden Furniture Co. 

Raleigh Department Store. 

Southern Educational Bureau. 

L. Schwartz, Meat Market. 

Taylor Furnishing Co. 

White's Ice Cream Co. 

■ung & Hughes, Plumbers. 

C. D. Arthur, Fish Market 

T. W. Blake, Jeweler. 

Thos. H. Briggs & Sons, Hardware. 

California Fruit Store. 



Bernard L. Crocker, Shoes. 
Ellington Art Store. 
S. Glass, Dry Goods. 
C. E. Hartge, Architect. 
Hick's Up-town Drug Store. 
Hunter-Rand Co., Dry Goods. 
Johnson & Johnson Co., Coal. 
Johnson & McCullers, Grocers. 
O'Quinn, Florist. 
Thomas A. Partin Co. 
H. Steinmetz, Florist. 
Toyland Company. 
Wake Drug Store. 
Walk-Over Shoe Shop. 

T. F. Brockwell, Locksmith. 
Cardwell & O'Kelly, Cleaners. 
Darnell & Thomas, Music House. 
Hayes & Hall, Photographers. 
Heller's Shoe Store. 
Hotel Giersch. 
Pescud's Book Store. 
Raleigh Floral Company. 
Raleigh French Dry Cleaning Co. 
Misses Reese & Co., Milliners. 
Herbert Rosenthal, Shoes. 
Royster's Candy Store. 
Watson's Picture & Art Co. 



These advertisements will be put in full in the magazine number of the 



ST. MARY'S MUSE 



OF 



ST. MARY'S SCHOOL 



RALEIGH, N. G. 




THANKSGIVING NUMBER 



NOVEMBER 30, 1914 



Our Thanksgiving 



Annie Sutton Cameron, '16. 



Another year has passed by, 
Another seed-time come and gone, 

And now against the wintry sky 
By chill November's icy winds 
The leafless boughs are blown. 

At last the farmer's toil is o'er 
His glorious harvest gathered in, 

And heaped up with golden store, 
Rewarding all his honest toil 
His garners overflow with grain. 

And Peace broods o'er our land today, 
And free from fear, from danger free, 

"We can pursue our accustomed way, 
Far distant from all toil and strife, 
In calm security. 

Shall not we then, so richly blest, 
Save, from our abundant store, 

Our hearts brimmed o'er with thankfulness 
For His great mercy and His love, 
Some portion for God's poor? 



ST. MARY'S MUSE 

RALEIGH, N. G. 



Published by the Muse Club at St. Mary's School. 
The Student Publication, and the official organ of the Alumnae. 












.Editor 








. .Business Manaaer 












Vol. XIX. November 30 


1914. 






No. 5. 



Two Thanksgivings 

"Oh, Gwamma," called little Mary, as she, Frank, and Papa burst joyously 
into the big living-room, where the family were gathered for their Thanks- 
giving reunion, "we's had the best time at the camp." 

"Yes," broke in Frank, eagerly, "and the convicts were so happy-looking 
when they saw our baskets ; why, they just grinned all over themselves." 

"An', Muvver, there was one poor old convic' who wan away last night, an' 
he won' have any Fanksgivin' turkey or anything; an' he's hidin' way off 
in the woods, where it's all col' an' shivery — " and there were tears in tender- 
hearted Mary's eyes. 

"Never mind, dear; don't you worry about the convict. Perhaps he'll go 
back to the camp. You all just come in here and see the wonderful dinner 
we've kept waiting for you," said grandma, throwing wide the dining-room 
door as she spoke. 

The family trooped merrily in and sat down at a table laden with every 
old-fashioned delicacy associated with a Thanksgiving dinner in the country: 
sugar-cured ham, fresh pork, cranberries, big red apples, chestnuts — but the 
spot reserved for the crowning glory, the turkey, was vacant. 

"Bring in the turkey, Aunt Lucinda, so Mr. John can carve him." 

Aunt Lucinda had been standing in the background trying to control her 
agitation, but at this command she broke into open sobbing. 



34 The St. Maby's Muse. 



"Oh, Miss Sally, dere — dere ain't no turkey!" 

"No turkey? Why, I saw him myself this morning." 

"And he was a great big turkey; why — most as big as Mary or Ethel," 
Frank added. 

"He wasn't, either," broke in Ethel, indignantly. 

"But Miss Sally, I lef him on de stove whiles I went atter some wood to 
kin'le up de fire; and when I come back — He was such a gran' turkey, an' 
I raised him frum a baby, jes' for today — an' now — " here Aunt Lucinda be- 
gan to cry again. 

Her grief was infectious: all the children who were not openly weeping 
were on the brink of doing so; and their mothers, papas, uncles, aunts, 
grown-up sisters and brothers, and even grandma and grandpa looked sur- 
prised, incredulous, and distressed. 

"Now, Aunt Lucinda," began grandpa in his most judicial manner, "will 
you try to tell us what became of the turkey?" 

"Well, suh, I left it on de stove, lak I jes' said, and when I came back dere 
warn't no trace of it — the dish was plum empty 'cept for this here ring." 

She extended as she spoke an old signet ring, so battered and scarred that 
the monogram was entirely illegible. Grandpa took the trinket and passed 
it silently around the wondering circle. 

"Was there no other trace of the thief?" 

"No, suh; nuthin'." 

"P'rhaps it wuz a witch flew in on her broomstick, Gwanpa," suggested 
Mary. 

"Oh, go on, silly," remonstrated Frank. "Witches are fakes. It was a 
hungry boy, an' he was poor but proud and honest, so he left this ring. And 
when he grows real rich" (Frank's imagination was glowing) "he'll come 
back and buy it from us. Please, can I have the ring?" 

The wiser heads, accepting neither romantic solution of the problem, 
agreed that the thief must have been a common tramp. They could not 
agree on his motives for leaving the ring, but at Frank's urgent request it 
was given to him; and dropping any idea of pursuing the thief they settled 
down with the best grace possible to a turkeyless Thanksgiving dinner. 

It was a good many years afterward in a city across the continent that a 
well-known philanthropist was walking slowly down a rather disreputable 
part of it. Following his yearly custom he had just returned from a visit 
to the penitentiary to find out what gift would be most acceptable to the 
prisoners, and was now looking for some young man for whom he might 
make the next day a real day of Thanksgiving. 

In front of a pawnship he noticed lingering, as if loath to go in, yet com- 
pelled to, a boy clad in a suit much the worse for wear, and bearing in his 
face the stamp of dissipation but of refinement also. He turned undecidedly 
a ring on his finger. The philanthropist, taken in an instant by something in 
the boy's face and manner, advanced quietly and spoke to him. 

"My boy, will you let me talk with you awhile?" 



The St. Mary's Muse. 35 



The boy started suddenly at this unexpected question, and looked at the 
man with frightened but honest eyes. 

"What do you want?" 

"Would it be prying into your affairs too much to ask if you intend to 
pawn that ring you seem to value so?" 

"Necessity compels me to part with it, sir." 

"Would you mind telling why to an old man who knows from experience 
how to sympathize with youthful follies?" (Seeing the boy's slight look of 
suspicion) "I am no detective or spy of any kind, I assure you, but if you 
would rather not tell me — " 

"I want to tell you," broke in the boy, impetuously. "You have a true 
' face, and I feel that if I only had someone near to encourage and advise me 
my way would not be so hard. My father died while I was in college, and I 
believed and persuaded my mother and sister that I could make enough 
money out west to support them, and they could come out here then and live, 
too. But, sir, it's the old, old story: bad company and a weak will, gamb- 
ling away more than I made, and pawning all my jewelry. I only clung to 
this ring, which I value as a talisman; it reminded me of home, my child- 
hood, and one Thanksgiving at my grandmother's old home; and seemed to 
keep me from going to the bad — but now, it's all I've got and it won't bring 
much, but it must go." 

"May I see it?" asked the older man, with a queer presentiment, which was 
confirmed by a close inspection of the ring. He turned it over with an odd 
choke in his throat, and in his mind a vision of a far-off scene. When he 
spoke again, his voice was very tender. 

"My son, I am a rich old bachelor, with no one to love in the world. Will 
you come with me, let me give you a new start on the road to honest suc- 
cess, and the means of supporting your mother and sister, who doubtless 
are so proud of you; and let me feel that I am in part atoning for a crime I 
once committed. By token of this ring, which recalls to us both, but with 
far different feelings, a certain Thanksgiving day — to you a happy family 
gathering and a stolen turkey — to me a lonely, escaped convict daring recap- 
ture to ward off starvation, a glimpse of home ties, a resolve, and a new 
life — by this token let me help you to build your life anew, and make tomor- 
row a Thanksgiving in its truest sense!" E. D. Davis, '16. 



Billy's Thanksgiving 



Billy, with his pale, freckled face, his ragged grey cap pulled down over 
whatever kind of hair he had, sat on the one step of his home. Anyone 
could tell that he was musing, for he looked straight before him and 
whistled now and then. Suddenly his manner changed. His eyes as well 
as his hand became restless. He grabbed off his cap, tossed it up, put it 
back on his head, gave another whistle, began playing with his cap again, 
and, in fact, continued an extraordinary display of restlessness. 



36 The St. Maby's Muse. 



A whoop was heard down the road. A short little boy dashed up to the 
step. 

"Come on, Billy!" he cried. "We are all goin' flshin'!" 

But Billy shook his head. "Go 'way, Sammy. I'm tryin' to make up my 
mind what I'll do to have a good time this evenin'. And Billy buried his 
face in his cap. 

"Aw, come on, Billy. You don't have to make up your mind — you just 
hafter come on. An' if you don't hurry up I'm goin 5 ." 

As the figure on the steps was immovable, Sammy "pshawed" and darted 
off. He had no time to waste on "such." 

Billy began his movements as before. Now he was apparently more 
mixed, for he jumped up into an apple tree and began swinging from one 
limb to another. Presently a song came to his ears — a sweet song in a 
babyish voice. 

"Bye, my baby, 
Bye, my baby, bye," 

ran the song. Billy let fall a big apple. 

"You goner break my doll!" cried an indignant voice. "You! — oh, the 
good old apple!" 

Billy had already recognized Cely, his little friend of the checked apron 
She was all smiles now. "Come and play wid me and my Sally Ann," she 
invited. 

Billy tossed his head. 

"I haven't hit on it yet, Cely," he said. 

"I don't want you to hit me any more! I want you to come and play wid 
me!" the little girl whimpered. 

I tell you I don't know what I'm gonter do! If you go 'way and be smart 
I might play wid you. Now go on," and Billy tossed into another limb. 

Billy again changed his manner. He hopped to the ground and began 
promenading before the door. Soon on hearing a noise he looked up, and 
beheld his grandmother, smiling at him. 

"Ketch yer death of cold, child. Come in and tell the old lady 'bout the 
good time ye had today. Guess what's in the cupboard at home." 

"Oh, grandma, I just can't go in now. All the same I'll think about the 
cupboard." And Billy turned away. 

"Wants to get off fishing, most likely," muttered the grandmother as she 
mounted the step. "Boys are such queer things ye can't tell what they'll do 
next." 

Billy's legs were really tired, but his brain seemed to be tireless. He perched 
himself up on a fence and settled himself in a position, though not graceful, 
yet calculated to help him settle the difficult matter. The sun was getting 
far back behind the trees and the air was becoming rather cool. Yet Billy 
was not aware of this. He now had in mind three important plans: one was 
to go and give Sammy some "brand new" fishing tackle; one was to run 
and toss Cely another big apple; and the third one was to rush over to 



■ 



The St. Mary's Muse. 37 



grandma's and see if the cupboard was locked. But, to save his life, Billy- 
could not decide what to do for Thanksgiving! 

"Billy! Billy!" called some one in the door. "Billy, there's a big piece of 
turkey left, and it's all for you. And you ought to see what grandma 
brought you. Hurry up!" 

"Yes," called Billy, "I'm coming!" At last Billy had decided. And the 
sun was almost out of sight. Henrietta Morgan, '18. 



Thanksgiving Plays Cupid 



The woman frowned slightly as her maid entered the room. 

"Is there anything Madamoiselle wishes?" Marie's soft voice had a note 
of concern in it as she viewed her mistress's distressed and unhappy face. 

"No — well, yes. Please have Jerome bring the car to the side entrance 
for me. I will be out after the last chorus. No, I am not at home to any 
one — you may go." 

Marie softly closed the door, wondering why one so young, beautiful and 
talented should always seem so unhappy. Perhaps there had been a school 
girl affair. It seemed to Marie that she had heard that all great actresses 
have these silly American affairs. But there, her business was to look after 
Madamoiselle's physical comfort and not her mental. With a shrug of her 
pretty shoulders she dismissed the subject from her mind. 

The woman leaned her head on her hand and gazed pensively out of the 
window, a thousand memories surging through her whole being. Outside 
the moon gleamed protectingly down on the gleaming Thanksgiving snow. 
Her thoughts ran riot. Was it only yesterday that they had parted, or had 
it been centuries? With an impatient jerk of her head, a movement that had 
helped make her famous, she quickly drew herself up and stood framed in 
the window. The very picture of a Greek goddess in her loveliness. 

Out in the street below the human tide surged by, an aimless mass, swayed 
by a common impulse to keep their heads above. 

The woman realized that she must have been standing thus an hour. 
Broadway always has the same attraction. One might look forever, and 
then turn away reluctantly. 

Seated comfortably in her motor she gave orders to be driven through 
Central Park. She must obey that impulse to get as close to nature as was 
possible in that city of unnaturalness. 

Rounding a corner a sight met the woman's gaze that made her shudder. 
A ragged little fellow with a bundle of papers under his arm stood directly 
in the way of her car. Frozen with horror she could only gasp out a few 
words of warning, but they came too late. 

"Jerome, put him in here and drive as quickly as possible to the Murray 
Hill Hospital, it's the nearest," she said, as she gathered the unconscious 
child to her heart. 

The woman's eyes filled with tears as she thought, "Poor little fellow; 
think of him having to spend his Thanksgiving like this, and I wonder — I 



38 The St. Mary's Muse. 



wonder, too, if he has had any breakfast or — " She lifted him from the car 
as gently as a mother could. 

All during the operation she waited anxiously below. "Suppose he dies?" 
she asked herself. "Could she ever rest with the thought of his pathetic 
little blue eyes looking up at her from the snowy pavement imploring her 
to stop the car?" 

A shadow suddenly darkened the door. 

"All is well, madam — you, Estelle; the boy? Tell me. I don't under- 
stand." 

She turned to leave, but the man caught her hand. 

"Don't leave me this time, Estelle. I lied to you that night. I had not 
seen your mother. Dear, can't we start again?" 

The man was tall and dark, his expression was wonderful as he gazed at 
his beautiful wife, with a look of love and entreaty. She did not move. 
Suddenly, remembering his position as house-doctor, he drew himself up. 

"I beg your pardon, madam; I didn't consider your feelings at all. The 
little fellow you brought here will come out all right." 

But the face she turned toward him was only full of love, forgiveness, and 
sweet contentment. 

"John, I — I know now that I was wrong; can you forgive me? I love you." 

The room glowed in the reflection of the dying fire. The man and woman 
knelt and offered a prayer of thanksgiving for the little boy's life; the boy 
who had so strangely brought them together. Robena Carter. 



School Notes 

November 12: Dr. Charles Smith's Address. 

On the evening of November 12th Dr. Charles Smith addressed the girls in 
the school-room. His subject was the life of the great French heroine, Joan 
of Arc. 

He portrayed to us not only the Joan of Arc of histories, but Joan of Arc 
the girl, the soldier, the seer of visions, the dreamer and the daughter of 
the old man of Domremy. He made us live over again the experiences of 
that "whitest lily on the shield of France." 

Dr. Smith received an unusual amount of applause and an earnest wish 
that he visit us again and tell us of just such a beautiful character as this 
"Whitest Lily." C. C. 

November 13th: Mrs. Lay Entertains the Seniors. 

On Friday night, November 13th, Mrs. Lay entertained the Senior Class 
at the Rectory. 

At eight o'clock we went to the Rectory, where we were welcomed at the 
door by Misses Ellen and Nancy Lay and ushered into cozy rooms with open 
fires. The most interesting feature of the evening was the drawing of pic- 
tures. Each girl was given a slip of paper and told to draw the person whose 
name was on it. When the pictures were finished they were pinned on the 



The St. Mary's Muse. 



curtains and a guessing contest followed. One prize was warded to Miss 
Elizabeth Carrison, who drew the best picture, and one to Miss Anna Belle 
King, who guessed the most names of the persons represented by the draw- 
ings. 

Any one who has ever been to one of Mrs. Lay's parties knows what 
delicious refreshments she serves. This time we had fruit salad, creamed 
oysters, sandwiches, ice cream and cake, and bonbons. M. J. H. 

November 14th: The Faculty Party to the School. 

The parlor, beautifully decorated in autumn leaves, was the scene of the 
delightful party given by the Faculty to the girls on November the 14th, 
from eight o'clock until ten. 

The students were greeted as they came in by the teachers in a long 
receiving line. They were then served punch by Madamoiselle Rudnicka and 
Miss Fenner. A delicious course of oysters and fruit salad was served, fol- 
lowing which a basket of many-colored hand-painted autumn leaves was 
passed around and each one took from it a leaf as a souvenir of one of the 
happiest occasions ever witnessed at St. Mary's. The pleasure was greatly 
added to by musical numbers rendered by Miss Shull, Miss Abbott, and Mr. 
Owen. The close of the evening came all too soon and it was in vain that 
we tried to express our appreciation to the Faculty for the delightful even- 
ing they had afforded us. Indeed they proved most charming hosts and 
hostesses. S. V. 

November 15th: Mr. Gill's Talk. 

Mr. Gill, the missionary to China, who has just returned to America on a 
furlough, was kind enough to talk to us at the Sunday afternoon service. 
He spoke very earnestly, as only a man who hasi put his whole soul into his 
work can do; who has worked not in a blind and therefore useless way, but 
thinking of his work and seeking beneath the surface of turmoil, rebellion, 
and unrest in China and finding beneath all this which is only the transition 
period from heatheism to a greater vision of hope, finding the light which 
the supporters of foreign Missions and the missionaries themselves can see 
who are not to be daunted by temporary discouragements. C. C. 

November 17th: Miss Thomas's Talk in Sigma Lambda. 
On the evening of November 17th the Sigma Lambda Literary Society 
greatly enjoyed a talk from Miss Thomas. Her subject was of the develop- 
ment of universities and the origin of many of their customs and privileges 
of today. She told how, at first, thousands of- students would gather from 
all parts of the country to hear one man talk, chiefly about Theological sub- 
jects. With this as a beginning she went on to tell how such great seats of 
learning as Cambridge and Oxford were founded and developed. It was all 
most interesting and Sigma Lambda looks forward with much pleasure to. 
having such a treat again. 



40 The St. Maey's Muse. 



November 17th: Miss Shattuck's Talk in Alpha Bho. 

On Tuesday evening, November 17, Miss Shattuck made a talk to the 
Alpha Rho Literary Society on "The Person With a Sense of Humor." She 
spoke of the person who possessed this "sixth" sense as one who is healthy, 
because he can indulge in a hearty laugh; genial, because he can see the 
bright places in life and pass the brightness on to his neighbor; considerate, 
because he is thoughtful of others. The speaker went on to show that the 
one with a sense of humor is ever a person of ready sympathy. After giving 
several illustrations from Mark Twain and others the speaker closed with 
the thought that sympathy is one of the great lessons of life, and that no 
one could desire a better motto than "to live in a house by the side of the 
road and be a friend to man!" 



Athletics 

Athletics are certainly going well this year at St. Mary's. We have 
already had one field day, on November 2d, and one basketball game between 
the Mus and Sigmas, November 9th, and are running a tennis tournament 
now. - 

Such enthusiasm has been shown in these contests that it promises well 
for others in the future. Nearly the whole School turned out on field day, 
and it was interesting to note the numerous devices by which the "rooters" 
of either side tried to show their loyalty. There were blue and white stock- 
ings, there were red S's and blue M's painted and pinned conspicuously on 
the garments or shoes of the participants; and one Association came out 
beating on old tin pans, while the other marched singing around the court in 
lockstep. 

The same excitement prevailed at the first basketball game between the 
first teom of the Mus and the first team of the Sigmas. The game was very 
close from start to finish and resulted in a victory for the Mus by a narrow 
margin of 17 to 15. 

The next basketball game will be played off Monday, November 30th, be- 
tween the two second teams. Then there will be another game between the 
two first teams and another between the second, of which the dates have not 
yet been fixed, and possibly two more if they can be arranged. E. D. D. 

November 8th: Basketball. 

The first basketball game of the season was played on Monday afternoon, 
November the 8th, in which the Mus won over the Sigmas. There was excel- 
lent playing done by both teams and great interest was manifested by the 
whole School. 

Miss Barton entertained both teams after the game. 



The St. Maby's Muse. 



41 



The line-up was 


as follows: 






Sigma. 




Forwards. 


Mu. 


Bar bee. 






Coles. 


Hope. 




Centers. 


Brinley. 


Thomas. 






Barton. 


Cameron. 




Guards. 


E. Davis. 


Mott. 






Beatty. 


Robinson. 






Holmes. 



Total: First half — Sigma 8, Mu 10; second half — Sigma 7, Mu 7. 
Referee, Miss Barton. Timekeeper, J. Wilson. Won by the Mus. Score, 
17-15. 



Our Exchanges 



It is a great pleasure to look over the collection of attractive magazines 
that have come to our Exchange Department for November. The exchange 
of magazines furnishes a stimulus for greater literary achievements, a feel- 
ing of sympathy and fellowship between the different colleges and schools, 
and strengthens the aim and purpose which we all should have to make our 
magazine better. Therefore we feel that it is a help as well as a pleasure 
to receive these magazines. 

The Davidson College Magazine for November opens with a poem, "Peace," 
which is very appropriate just at this time. One of the stories, "The Traitor," 
is also based on the subject interesting to all — the war. In this story the 
questions which arise are "What is the National Honor," and "What are the 
rights of our people in time of war?" The whole story is indeed quite a 
good bit of writing. There is much merit throughout this number of the 
magazine. The literary department especially deserves mention. 

The October-November number of Pine and Thistle also deserves mention 
for the good literary work of this issue. The editors- are truly wide-awake 
and the general tone shows much enthusiasm and interest of the student- 
body. 

We acknowledge with pleasure the following November magazines: The 
Messenger, Pine and Thistle, The Stetson Weekly Collegiate, The Monthly 
Chronice, Davidson College Magazine, the Quill, The Wake Forest Student 
Magazine, the University of North Carolina Magazine, Wahisco, The College 
Message, The College of Charleston Magazine. Helen Northcott. 



42 The St. Mary's Muse. 



Joax 

Senior to Freshman: "Did you ever take Chloroform?" 
Freshman: "No, who teaches it." — Ex. 

He: "Do you wear a rat?" 

She: "No, dear; I am afraid to wear one when you are around; you do 
look so kittenish." — Ex. 

"Have you heard the latest invention?" 

"No, what is it?" 

"Aeroplane poison; one drop will kill you." — Ex. 

"Willie," said the teacher, "Give me three good reasons why the world is 
round." 

"Yes'm," said Willie cheerfully, "The book says so, you say so, and ma 
says so." — Ex. 

Wanted: A belt for the waste of time. 

Concerning College sports, 

Too oft it comes to pass 
That he who's half-back on the team 

Is way back in his class. — Ex. 

A Queer Proposition Proved (Read Aloud). 

A sheet of paper=an ink lined plane. 

An inclined plane=a slope up. 

A slow pup=a lazy dog. 

Therefore, a sheet of paper=a lazy dog. — Ex. 



Our Advertisers 



Boylan-Pearce Co., Dry Goods. 
J. C. Brantley, Druggist. 
Dobbin-Ferrall Co., Dry Goods. 
Edwards & Broughton Printing Co. 
Norfolk Southern Railroad. 
M. Rosenthal & Co., Grocers. 
The Tyree Studio. 

Atlantic Fire Insurance Co. 
Carolina Power & Light Co. 
King-Crowell Drug Store. 
King's Grocery, "The Little Store." 
The Fashion, Kaplan Bros. Co. 
French Hat Shop. 
Jolly & Wynne Jewelry Co. 
H. Mahler's Sons, Jewelry. 
The Office Stationery Co. 
Royall & Borden Furniture Co. 
Raleigh Department Store. 
Southern Educational Bureau. 
L. Schwartz, Meat Market. 
Taylor Furnishing Co. 
White's Ice Cream Co. 
Young & Hughes, Plumbers. 

C. D. Arthur, Fish Market 

T. W. Blake, Jeweler. 

Thos. H. Briggs & Sons, Hardware. 

California Fruit Store. 



Bernard L. Crocker, Shoes. 
Ellington Art Store. 
S. Glass, Dry Goods. 
C. E. Hartge, Architect. 
Hick's Up-town Drug Store. 
Hunter-Rand Co., Dry Goods. 
Johnson & Johnson Co., Coal. 
Johnson & McCullers, Grocers. 
O'Quinn, Florist. 
Thomas A. Partin Co. 
H. Steinmetz, Florist. 
Toyland Company. 
Wake Drug Store. 
Walk-Over Shoe Shop. 

T. F. Brockwell, Locksmith. 
Cardwell & O'Kelly, Cleaners. 
Darnell & Thomas, Music House. 
Hayes & Hall, Photographers. 
Heller's Shoe Store. 
Hotel Giersch. 
Pescud's Book Store. 
Raleigh Floral Company. 
Raleigh French Dry Cleaning Co. 
Misses Reese & Co., Milliners. 
Herbert Rosenthal, Shoes. 
Royster's Candy Store. 
Watson's Picture & Art Co. 



These advertisements will be put in full in the magazine number of the 
Muse. 



tEfie 



ft t iWarp'g Jfflttfe 



&aletgf), & C 




Cfcrtetma*, 1914 

iflagajine J^umfeer 




The St. Mary's Muse. 

MAGAZINE NUMBER 



Vol. XIX. 



December, 1914. 



The Christmas Dawn 



"Peace on earth, good will to men!" 
Is the angels' Christmas song. 

"Peace on earth, good will to men," 
How the world seems wrong! 

Nations at each other's throats, 
Children homeless and forlorn, 

Soldiers dying on the field, 
Greet this Christmas dawn. 

Is the world a contradiction 
Which the laws of God reverse? 

Is the blessing of the angels 
Turned into a fearful curse? 

Let us trust in God's solution 
That this strife may have an end, 

And another Christmas witness 
"Peace on earth good will to men. 



No. 6 



E. D. D., '16. 



A Legend 

"Teresa! Teresa!" 

In answer to the bishop's call a young girl appeared in the door. 

"Padre, was it you ?" 

"Yes, yes, my child; I— I'm going to my room now and on no 
conditions must I be disturbed. I had a bad night, my little one, 
and I wish to seek some comfort with my beads." 



44 The St. Maey's Muse. 



"Padre, padre ! It breaks my heart to see you worry so." 
"There, there, Teresa; go along now." 

The bishop's anxiety had good foundation; ten years ago he had 
landed on this western soil, he and his two comrades ; seeking at once 
the heart of the country they had begun the task of Christianizing 
the Aztec Indians. 

"Ten years of earnest and faithful service, and with what result! 
Not a Christian convert, not one have I made. ~No, no, I would 
better return to the mother country and give it up. God has not 
seen fit for me to do the work. Yes, it was fruitless ; but what then 
did last night's vision mean? Did I dream it or was it that the 
Virgin stood by my bed ?" 

While the Bishop was thus musing there was a gentle knock and 
the door opened. 

"Teresa, you disobey my request that — ?" 

"Padre, forgive me but there is a messenger without, so strange 
and so pathetic that I had not the heart to refuse him your audience." 

"Very well ; show him in." 

"Strange and pathetic," the words well described the man. His 
height was accentuated by an immense leather apron strapped to 
his shoulders and falling to his knees. A mass of straight black 
hair set off a dark skin scarcely less brown than the rough sandals on 
his feet. The Bishop had little difficulty in recognizing the man be- 
fore him as an Indian mountaineer. 

"Are you he whom they call El Padre ?" 

The Bishop bowed his head. 

" 'Tis good of you to see one so poor and humble, so far inferior — " 

"~No, no, my son. In the sight of God there is no difference ; be- 
fore Him the rich and the poor are all alike. I am but His messen- 
ger here; His and the Holy Virgin's. The desolation and misery 
of the people would not be so intense if they would but believe in her ; 
if they would but seek comfort from her." 

As the Bishop spoke he rose to his feet and with arms outspread 
and eyes raised towards heaven continued as though in a trance: 

"She can plead for us at His throne ; we have but to pray to her — 
she will answer our prayers and — " 



The St. Mary's Muse. 45 



The Bishop fell back aghast as the Indian, spying the cross about 
his neck, seized it and falling on both knees murmured over and over : 

"She too had one of these, she too — " 

"Man, man, you have seen her then ?" 

"Padre, 'tis she who sent me. Last night while on the mountain 
by myself a beautiful woman surrounded with light appeared and 
bade me come tell you to have no misgivings but to continue for your 
work would prosper. 'Twas the Holy Virgin herself of whom you 
spoke." 

As the man spoke a wild look appeared in his face. 

"Padre, Padre, believe her; she is good." 

"My son" — the Bishop's feelings were calmed now; the Indian's 
strange look and manner had convinced him that the man was in- 
sane — " 'tis but a dream you've had ; give it no more thought but 
return to your home." 

"Then you will stay, Padre?" 

"No, no, my work here is over; before the moon wanes again I 
will be gone unless" — the Bishop clung to one last hope — "unless 
before that time you can bring me some sure sign, some proof of the 
vision you have had." 

At his words the Indian straightened. 

"I will ask her for a proof when she comes; she said she would 

come again." 

******* 

Three weeks had passed since the messenger's strange visit and 
before long the Bishop would be taking his departure. It was a cold, 
i bleak December day that the Bishop and Teresa sat musing before 
a smoky wood fire. 

"Teresa, how long is it now until Christmas ?" 

"Tomorrow, Padre." 

"Christmas Eve and not a chime! Christmas Day and not a 
service !" 

"Never mind, Padrecito, it won't be long now before we'll be back 
in the old country, then we shan't want for services." 

"Teresa, you'll be glad to go back. ISTot so I ; I have grown to love 
this land ; if only I could have strength to go on with the work. If 



46 The St. Maey's Muse. 



only the vision could have been true. Well, good-night, little one." 

Thus easily did the Bishop dismiss his niece, but not so his worry. 
All night long his thoughts dwelt continually on the thought of turn- 
ing back from the work he had begun. 

Unable to sleep and weary of tossing about the Bishop rose early 
the next morning intending to take a walk. Hardly had he finished 
his toilet when there came a hasty knock at his door and Teresa, 
greatly excited, called to him : 

"Padre ! Padre ! here's a Christmas gift for you. Come ! Oh 
hurry !" 

As the Bishop stepped out into the courtyard the strange messen- 
ger came up to him. 

"Her proof, Padre, that the vision was real." 

As he spoke he let fall from his apron a mass of peach blossoms. 

But the next instance the Bishop was on his knees for there on the 

old man's apron was painted a picture of the Holy Virgin in all her 

beauty. 

******* 

Today in the wonderful old cathedral in Mexico City there hangs 
a rough leather apron with a picture of the Holy Virgin painted on 
it. Hundreds go there daily; some for prayer, some for curiosity, 
but to all inquiries as to its origin the same story is told of the paint- 
ing made by the peach blossoms. 

J. O. Wilson, '16. 



His Mother's Christmas 



The big oak logs crackled and popped, shedding a Christmas cheer 
on the little family grouped around them. The little gray-haired, 
gentle-faced mother, the big, smiling father, the tall, bright-faced 
girl of seventeen, and the merry little boy of five seemed to make a 
complete family circle, yet there was a touch of sadness in the gentle 
face of the little mother, and the father's laugh did not have the 
ringing sound of old. 

Suddenly the little boy's merry chatter of Santa Claus stopped, 
&nd getting up from the floor he walked to his mother's side. There, 



The St. Maet's Muse. 47 



leaning against her knees and looking at her with his big solemn 
brown eyes, he asked in his slow way, "Will Santa Claus come to 
see my brother if he's not at home ?" 

The mother answered with a sigh. It was five years since her big 
boy had gone away to make a place for himself in the world, as he 
said. 

When he had kissed his mother good-bye he had told her that it 
didn't matter where he went or what he did she would always be his 
girl, and that Christmas would always be her day. He had said then 
that he would come any distance, away from anybody, just to spend 
that day with her. The mother's understanding heart had known that 
some day he would very likely get another girl, but she had cherished 
the promise of that one Christmas day. As time went on his visits 
had been less frequent and shorter each time, so the mother had begun 
to fear that the world and society in which he now lived was taking 
him away from her. Each Christmas he had been home, filling the 
house with laughter and joy by his pranks and jokes. 

And he wasn't coming this Christmas ! He was only eighty miles 
away and yet he had written a short letter saying that he could not 
come. He was very busy, and one of his friends, the rich Robert 
Richmond, whom he had met in Atlantic City, was going to spend 
Christmas with him, so he had written he could not come, as he 
thought Bob would enjoy the society and clubs much more than the 
dull country. 

Somehow the mother didn't quite understand, the country had 
never been dull for her, especially at Christmas, and she had never 
known before that it had been dull for her boy. "But," she explained 
to the little boy leaning against her knees, "Brother Ted must do 
whatever will give his guest the best time." 

But, then, it would be a lonesome Christmas without him. And 
as they sat around the big fire that night before Christmas Eve a 
gloom hung over them which even the father's funniest jokes and 
liveliest tales could not dispel. 

7T "?S* "7T "TV" W Tv" W 

Bob had just come, and he and Ted sat in Ted's steam-heated room 
talking of the many Christmases they had spent, when Bob said, 



48 The St. Maky's Muse. 



"And to think, tomorrow night Santa Clans will be going around. 
We bachelors who have to depend on clubs and society for our Christ- 
mas have a poor time. It isn't much Christmas after all unless you 
are in a home with a little boy. Lucky dogs, those fellows who have 
wives and mothers." Ted looked at Bob with surprise. "Come, let's 
be dressing for the dance," he said, "you are to take Miss Wilkins." 

They dressed silently, and an hour later were in the big ball room. 
There the brilliant lights, the racy music and the bewitching girls 
drove from Ted's mind all the lonesome thoughts which had crowded 
into it at the mention of home and mother. 

During the evening the charming Miss Lee reminded Ted that he 
and his guest were to eat Christmas dinner with her and from there 
were going to a little informal dance. Just before leaving Mr. Whit- 
more told Ted to be at his office at 5 :30 tomorrow evening and they 
would try to get that big deal through before Christmas. 

The next morning Ted left for the office hurriedly, telling Bob to 
amuse himself and to be at the club at 1 o'clock for lunch. He was 
very busy all morning, but just before leaving for the club he walked 
to his office window. The sky was gray and it looked as if it were 
going to snow. He wondered if Santa Claus was going to bring 
little Harry a sled. Then his gaze happened to rest on a sweet-faced 
little woman pushing her way through the throng of happy Christ- 
mas shoppers. He thought of his own mother and of all the happy 
Christmases he had spent. At that moment he realized for the first 
time that he was one of those lucky fellows who had a mother to go 
to ; and yes, he would go to her at any cost. 

Ted, in his old determined way, lost no time having once made 
up his mind. He wrote a few polite notes breaking his engagements, 
and then he called up Mr. Whitmore and asked him to postpone the 
deal. But Mr. Whitmore, fearing that somebody would get ahead 
of him if the deal was delayed, agreed to pay Ted twice as much if 
he would close the contract immediately. 

At 2 o'clock Ted bounced into the clubroom, breathless and dis- 
heveled, but real Christmas thrills were racing up and down his 
spine. "Have you eaten ?" he shot at Bob. "No, I thought — " Bob 
started, but was interrupted. "Well eat in a hurry for we've just 



The St. Mary's Muse. 49 



one hour and a half to do all our Christmas shopping, pack, and 
catch the 3 :30 train. Man ! Bob, didn't you know we were going 
home, back to the old farm, for Christmas ?" 

While they were eating Bob found out that the finest mother and 
father in the world lived on the farm, that there was a little brother 
just five, also a pretty sister sixteen or seventeen Ted didn't know 
which, with whom they would have "the happiest Christmas in the 
world." "We will reach a town nearest home about five-thirty and 
then we drive seven or eight miles," Ted told him. 

In the Christmas shops they stopped at nothing. They bought 
enough toys for five little boys. Mother, father, sister and even old 
Amy were well remembered. At last triumphantly they walked into 
the homebound train with their overload of Christmas bundles. 
******* 

The mother sank tiredly into her chair by the fire. She had been 
busy all the week cooking goodies and doing every possible thing to 
make up for Ted's absence. 

Elizabeth ran into the room, her dark cheeks were glowing, and 
her black eyes danced and sparkled. "Something exciting is surely 
going to happen, I've got Christmas in my bones," she said laugh- 
ingly. "It's snowing, it's snowing," little Harry yelled excitedly 
as he danced into the room. In a few minutes the father came stamp- 
ing in, clapping his cold hands together and shaking the snow from 
his shoulders. "It just had to snow for Santa's reindeers, didn't 
it, Harry, lad ?" he asked of his light-haired little son, who was 
curled up on the rug watching sparks fly up the chimney. 

The sound of horses' hoofs on the frozen ground and a loud "halloo" 
caused all four to look up with a start. "That negro Dan is getting 
in mighty early for Christmas Eve," the father said, and they all sat 
silently listening to the echoing steps as they died away. Suddenly 
faithful old Amy, beaming and breathless, burst into the room. 

"Lawsy ! mistiss, he's heah, he sho is ! Hit's him alright !" 

A boyish figure dashed into the room which deferred for quite some 
time any further explanation from old Amy. 

Katherine Bourne, '16. 



50 The St. Maky's Muse. 



Zamee's Christmas 



As the cool twilight descended upon the parched desert the weary 
camel boy, Zamee, listened no longer to the surly voices of the camel 
drivers as they gave peremptory orders to the lower servants. His 
thoughts were far away in Moorab where his little dark-eyed sweet- 
heart Zuleka was dancing in the public square. Again he could hear 
the soft clang-clang of the tambourines and see her dark eyes flash 
as one of the bystanders tossed a shining piece of silver in her out- 
stretched tambourine. Then he clenched his teeth as he thought of 
the only thing that stood between him and his dark-eyed love — the 
money which would buy her from her dancing mistress. How could 
he ever earn enough money? 

He was recalled from his reverie by the excitement in the camp, 
caused by the approach of another caravan. Nearer and nearer it 
drew until from a tiny black speck on the horizon it assumed large 
proportions. 

As it drew near enough to be clearly discerned Zamee observed that 
the caravan was headed by a white man of the race hated by nearly 
all the Arabs; but not so with Zamee, for his teacher had been of 
those same white people and she had taught him to speak English, 
and had also told him of her religion, the Christian religion. He 
recalled her name clearly now — Marie Reidling. 

The caravan had arrived, so out of curiosity Zamee stood up to 
watch the unpacking of the camels, for it was evident that they in- 
tended spending the night near this same oasis. The white man and 
the owner of Zamee's caravan were conversing. The white man was 
asking whether or not the other caravan would object if his caravan 
pitched its tents there as darkness was approaching. On being as- 
sured that the other caravan had no objection the servants began to 
unload the camels. 

Zamee was interested in the white man. He was tall and stalwart 
with dark hair and brown eyes, and his skin was slightly tanned, 
showing that he had lived much in the open. He seemed to be having 
some difficulty in unstrapping his camel's pack, so Zamee stepped 
forward and shyly offered his assistance, which was gratefully ac- 



The St. Mary's Muse. 51 



cepted by the stranger. In a few moments Zamee had accomplished 
his task, and as he stepped back the stranger whispered to him: 

"Tonight I will see you in front of the fire after all are asleep." 

Zamee nodded his assent. 

When the cool night had descended upon the weary desert Zamee 
crept cautiously out of his little tent and took his seat before the. 
flickering fire. In a few moments he was joined by the stranger. 
Zamee noticed in the dim light that the muscles in the white man's 
face worked spasmodically, and instinctively he knew that the stranger 
was in trouble. A few minutes of silence intervened, and then the 
stranger turned toward him and broke out passionately: 

"Boy, I just had to tell some one, and I thought I'd tell you be- 
cause your guide said you could speak English. My name is Horton 
Madden. I am a government surveyor and as I have a leave of ab- 
sence for two months I am spending it traveling." 

To the boy the speech seemed wild and incoherent. In a soothing 
voice he said: 

"You have come to Arabia just to travel?" 

The arrow had found its mark for the stranger's voice trembled 
with emotion as he answered: 

"No, I am seeking the girl I love. She came to this heathenish 
land as a missionary teacher. This is my first vacation in two years 
and I have come to find her and to take her home with me but she 
has left Moorab and none of those heathen know where she has gone." 

There was despair in his voice now. A flame of hope burned in 
the breast of Zamee as he asked eagerly: 

"How much would you give to know where she is now?" 

"Give! Give!" Madden shouted, "I'd give all I have." 

Zamee edged closer. "For fifty dollars," he said, "I'll tell you 
where she is." 

Abruptly breaking off from the subject, Madden said: 

"Today is Christmas Day but there is no Christmas for me un- 
less I find Marie. Boy," he continued, "I will give you the fifty dol- 
lars," and diving into his pocket he slowly counted out five ten-dollar 
bills and handed them to Zamee. 



52 The St. Mast's Muse. 



"She is at Yaran, two miles on the other side of the desert," said 

Zamee. "She is teaching there." 

In sheer joy Madden sprang up and shouted: 

"I have found my Christmas ; Marie is my Christmas." 

Vaguely understanding, the happy Zamee jumped up and with 

his face to the stars he exclaimed with all the passion of his fiery 

nature : 

"I have found my Christmas," and then in a whisper, "Zuleka is 

my Christmas." Elsie Alexander, '16. 



The Two Little Belgians' Christmas Eve 

[A story written by Elizabeth Lay in Freshman French, signed Mademoiselle Meprises (Miss 
Mistakes), and translated from the French by Elizabeth Carrison ]. 

It was night. Around the little house the fields of old Peter lay 
bright in the light of the moon and the roofs of the village were white 
with snow. Every one was at rest because it was Christmas Eve. 
Inside the little house old Peter and his wife had been very busy, 
but now the candles were low and a delightful harmony of noises is- 
sued from the room in which the good old couple were asleep. Close 
to this two little children were asleep. These children were Belgian 
refugees to whom a cordial welcome had been given by Pierre and 
Marie ; their only child having gone to war. 

Soon a little noise was heard coming from the children's bed. 

"Jean, are you awake?" 

"JSTo, Pappette, I am sound asleep. Hush, the little Jesus will 
hear us talking." 

All was quiet. Then — 

"Pappette, are you awake ?" 

"Yes, Jean." 

"Pappette, are you crying?" 

"Oh, Jean, do you believe that the little Jesus can bring back our 
dear mamma to us and put her in our little shoes ?" 

"Ah, yes ; the little Jesus can do everything." 

All was quiet. Then — 



The St. Mary's Muse. 53 



"Let's look into the shoes, Jean." Then there was the pattering 
of tiny bare feet across the floor. 

"Jean, you look into the shoes." There were apples, nuts, candy, 
a doll, a drum, but not a mother. 

"Oh !" said both disappointed children together. 

"Listen, Pappette, some one is coming." A noise of tiny feet, then 
all was again quiet. 

Suddenly the door opened and a woman stood and looked into the 
room. 

"Surely this must be the house of Monsieur Peter; this must be 
the house where my little ones are staying. There are — " 

At this moment two pairs of arms were thrown around her. 

"The little Jesus has brought our mamma." 

"The little Jesus has brought her to us." 

Just then the door of Peter's room was opened and a head with 
i a night-cap on was thrust in ; then withdrawn, embarrassed. 

"You are the mother of these little ones, are you not, madame?" 

"Ah, yes, sir; I can never tell you — " 

"And the little Jesus has brought her. You are the best gift in 
all the world, mamma," two little voices cried out. 

"You must be very tired; come and rest," said old Marie, who 
had come in. 

Everything was again quiet in the little house of old Peter. Only 
the fire crackled from time to time and the cat dozed in front of the 
chimney. 

Soon the Christmas bells were ringing out over the village, clear 

i and sweet. It was Christmas morning. All the village folk went to 

i morning mass and every one prayed to God for the French army and 

for the brave soldiers who were fighting for France ; and two little 

Belgian children prayed for the soldiers and also for the poor Belgian 

refugees. 



54 The St. Maey's Muse. 



" Those St. Mary's Girls " 

(Anonymou3) 



"I am just mad enough to slap some one." 

I turned with surprise to find that the dear fat lady who had 
seated herself beside me was very much out of breath as well as out 
of temper. Her remark which was evidently addressed to me as- 
tonished me so that it was all I could do to stammer out : 

"Er— a— is that so?" 

"Yes, it is so, and you can always expect it to be just so if those 
St. Mary's girls have anything to do with it." The fat party was 
now rapidly getting back her breath but not her temper. 

"There I've been waiting fifteen minutes for a car and all because 
a St. Mary's girl told me that that last car was a private one." 

"A private car ?" 

"Yes; when I got on I asked why such a number of girls were on 
and what did one of those saucy imps do but tell me that I had made 
a mistake, that it was a private car and wouldn't stop between Fay- 
etteville and St. Mary's. Just as the car started off I heard a shout 
of laughter go up. I suppose they thought it a great joke to have put 
me off, but I didn't." 

She had quite regained her breath by this time and was now mak- 
ing good use of it. 

"Why it was just last night at the theater that a whole line of 
people had to wait fully five minutes while one of those magpies 
stood chattering to some one ; their inconsiderateness is appalling 
and if you have the ill luck to take a seat in the car by one she just 
about crowds you off." 

I couldn't exactly picture this corpulent lady being pushed off of 
anything, much less a seat. 

"I just would like to know how much those girls can eat ; I heard 
one of them remark while in Brantley's that that was her second 
cream and she had already had a chicken salad, and I haven't a doubt 
but that—" 

But her sentence was never finished for just then the car stopped 
at the summer house and I had to get off. However as I reached 



The St. Mary's Muse. 55 



the door I couldn't resist calling back in answer to her amazed ques- 
tion, "Are you a St. Mary's girl ?" "Yes, and the very same one who 
ate two creams and a chicken salad." 



SCHOOL LIFE 



Sadie Vinson, Courtney Crowther, Matilda Hancock, Editors. 
The Christmas Ship 

It has been well said of Mr. Keeley, of the Chicago Herald, who 
originated the idea of the "Christmas Ship," that he had the spirit 
of the poet with the hard common sense that poets often lack. 

The people of the whole nation grasped his idea enthusiastically, 
one hundred and ninety newspapers from San Francisco to New 
York being the organizers of the expedition. Churches, Sunday 
Schools, Boy Scouts, Camp-fire Girls and children everywhere have 
worked, sacrificed and given freely. Especially generous, it is said, 
were the army veterans, particularly old Confederate soldiers who 
in their time have had opportunity to know the poverty and suffering 
of an invaded land. 

One school sent $616.56; in another an industrial class made 
thirty little flannelette nighties and twenty-three soft little petticoats. 
Most of the gifts were useful articles, usually clothing, no money being 
accepted. Ten per cent of the cargo was food, thirty per cent toys 
to gladden the hearts of little Belgians, Germans, Russians and 
French children. One child sent an apron with a note folded in the 
pocket. On the scrap of paper was written, "From a Polish to a 
Belgian girl." Four marbles rolled from the pocket of a coat. 

The Santa Claus ship "Jason," all freshly painted for the occasion, 
waited in New York bay until Friday, the thirteenth, and all its 
dangers were past, and then put out to sea. 

No opportunity to make some little sacrifice was ever more wel- 
come to St. Mary's girls than that of being allowed to take a part in 
sending things for the "Christmas Ship." It was Miss Thomas who 
conceived of the idea that St. Mary's should do its share, and the 
chaperons' lists were longer than usual on the first Monday of Oc- 



56 The St. Mary's Muse. 



tober. With the money that was donated Miss Thomas and Miss 
Urquhart bought sweaters, coats, thick stockings, wool gloves and 
caps. The girls could not resist putting in attractive dolls, toys and 
games. People in town and especially the merchants were very gen- 
erous in the things they sent to help fill the boxes. Two large ones 
were packed full. 

Several weeks later at an inter-society meeting Miss Thomas read 
an announcement of the arrival of the "Jason" and its warm recep- 
tion in England, the first stopping place of the American Santa Claus. 

E. R B. 

Thanksgiving Day: An Inter-Society Meeting 

An inter-society meeting was held in the parlor on Thanksgiving 

Day immediately after dinner to give us a deeper insight into the 

meaning of the day. Thanksgiving Day is an old old custom in 

America, and it is interesting to note how it has been celebrated in 

the same manner since early days. The program of this meeting 

was as follows : 

The Origin of Thanksgiving Nettie Gaither 

A New England Thanksgiving Estelle Ravenel 

The Arrival of the Christmas Ship in England Miss Thomas 

Poem Read by Buf ord Aiken 

Recitation, "I Ain't Afraid" Annabelle Converse 

Song, "The Landing of the Pilgrims" Chorus 

Nov. 28th: "Ici On Parle Francais" A Farce 
The Muse Club delighted the school and friends from town on the 
evening of JSTovember 28th by a presentation of "Ici On Parle Fran- 
cais," a farce in one act. The play was not lacking in action and 
humor and the parts were well chosen and executed. 

Among those who deserve special mention were the parts of Mon- 
sieur DuBois, taken by Agnes Barton; Major Eegulus Rattan, taken 
by Courtney Crowther, and that of Mrs. Spriggins, played by Carol 
Collier. 

The following program will probably prove interesting to those 
not present: 



The St. Mary's Muse. 57 



Cast of Characters. 

Major Regulus Rattan ' Courtney Crowther 

Victor DuBois Agnes Barton 

Mr. Spriggins Margaret H. Bottum 

Mrs. Spriggins Carol Collier 

Angelina (their daughter) Elsie Alexander 

Julia (wife of Major Rattan) Helen Peoples 

Anna Maria (Irish maid) Annie Cameron 

Scene: A parlor in total disorder at the home of the Spriggins. 

Nov. 28th, 29th : Deaconess Goodwin's Visit 
Deaconess Goodwin, Student Secretary of the Board of Missions, 
spent several days with us. Even though she was not here long she 
made herself very much loved and put renewed energy into the 
Junior Auxiliaries. 

She was introduced to us Saturday night, and Sunday morning 
during the regular Sunday School hour addressed the girls in the 
schoolroom, taking for her subject the ways in which we should de- 
vote our lives to the work and the service of others. 

The girls gathered voluntarily in the parlor Sunday night and the 
deaconess again spoke, with her customary sweetness, freshness, and 
• enthusiasm on the great work in China and the efforts of our church 
at St. Mary's, the school there for girls. 

Dec. 2nd. 3rd : North Carolina Literary and Historical Association 
Many of the girls attended the meetings of the North Carolina 
Literary and Historical Association at Meredith College on Wednes- 
day and Thursday evenings of December 2d and 3d. 

The program on Wednesday evening consisted of an address by 
Dr. Archibald Henderson, the President of the Association, on "The 
New North State," and an address by Romolo S. Naon, the ambas- 
sador from the Argentine Republic to our country, also well known 
as the president of the Niagara Conference. He was introduced by 
Governor Craig and spoke on "Some Argentine Ideas." 

The Patterson Cup, which is awarded every year to the person 
who has made the greatest contribution to North Carolina literature 
during that year, was awarded this year to Dr. Hamilton of the 
University of North Carolina. 



58 The St. Maey's Muse. 



On Thursday night Dr. C. Alphonso Smith of the University of 
Virginia spoke on the life and works of William Sidney Porter, 
known to us as O. Henry, the famous short-story writer, a native 
of this State. 

At the close of the address the audience went to the new state 
building where the unveiling of the tablet to O. Henry took place. 
After a short address by Dr. Henderson the tablet was presented 
by the Governor and unveiled by O. Henry's daughter. 

Community Service WeeK : North Carolina Day 

Last week was celebrated as community service week all over the 
State and Friday was set aside as North Carolina Day. 

On that day, December 4th, from twelve-thirty to one, we assem- 
bled in the parlor to pay all honor to our State. The following pro- 
gram was rendered : 

Song by the School — "Carolina." 

Readings by Primary Pupils S. Pendleton, P. Holstead, I. Jones, V. Lay 

Reading, "Ho! for Carolina" Eliza Davis 

Song, "Dixie" By the School 

Address by Mr. Lay. 

Song, "America" By the School 

Mr. Lay's address was on North Carolina, which he extolled not 
as the best State, but as one of the best States, assuring those from 
other States that they would soon learn to love it as he had done. 

The participation by the Primary Department in the program was 
much enjoyed by all. 

Dec. 5th : The Bazaar of the Lucy Bratton Chapter 
The zeal and enthusiasm of the Lucy Bratton Chapter of the 
Junior Auxiliary was shown on Saturday night, December 5th, by 
the attractive bazaar which they gave in the old dining-room. 

The room was attractively decorated in Christmas colors and 
dainty and useful gifts of every kind were displayed. Ice cream, 
candy and cake were also sold. The success of the bazaar was mani- 
fested by the short time in which everything was sold and by the 
generous amount taken in by the Chapter. 



The St. Mary's Muse. 59 



Dec. 7th: "Arms and the Man" 

George Bernard Shaw's "Arms and the Man" was presented by 
I the University of North Carolina Dramatic Association in the St. 
Mary's auditorium on Monday evening, December 7, 1914. 

The Carolina Dramatic Club always stars in its plays and the an- 
nual play is always anticipated with great pleasure by the St. Mary's 
girls. This year it was unusually good. 

The auditorium was crowded and the interest of the play was 
unfailing. So in sympathy was the audience with the players that 
yawns were quite widespread when poor, sleepy Captain Bluntchli 
was struggling to keep awake at the orders of the heroine Raina. 

We recognized several of the best actors whom we had seen before. 
Each and every one took his part so well that, after the heated argu- 
i ments which followed the play as to which characters were best, we 
cannot give any decided preference. 

The program was as follows : 

DRAMATIS PERSONAE. 

I Major Sergius Saronoff, an officer in the Bulgarian Army, and 

betrothed to Raina Leon Applewhite, '18 

Major Petkoff, Father to Raina, also in the Bulgarian Army, 

W. P. M. Weeks, '15 
Captain Bluntchli, a Swiss serving in the Servian Army, and a 

Refugee after the Battle of Slivnitza Chas. Coggin, Law, '16 

Catherine, Wife to Major Petkoff W. D. Kerr, '15 

i Louka, Maid to Raina Bruce Webb, '18 

! Raina B. L. Meredith, '18 

i Nikola, Servant to the Petkoffs H. V. Johnson, '16 

Russian Officer J. L. Harrison, '16 

Place — A small town in Bulgaria. 
Time — November, 1885. 



SYNOPSIS OP ACTS. 
Act I. Raina's bedchamber on the night of the Victory of the Bulgarians 
over the Servians. 
Act II. Garden behind Major Petkoffs house, the following afternoon. 
Act III. A little later. Major Petkoffs library. 



60 The St. Maby's Muse. 



TALES AROUND SCHOOL 



A Beautiful Spree 
(Tune: "By the Sea.") 
She and I were always together, 
Said she to me, "It's just the right weather, 
So let's plan out a beautiful spree. 
It won't take long this wild idee 
That I would reveal to you, 
It is bound to strongly appeal to you." 

We skipped study hall, 

And that wasn't all 
For it was a beautiful spree. 

Chorus. 
But you see, but you see, 
When Miss Eleanor T. 
Looked at us, looked at us, 
We weren't happy, not we. 
When each day came a-rollin' by, 
We were gay and free, 
And we'd play and fool around together. 
Over and done for, we're up in the air; 
I am mad, I am sad, 
So now what do we care? 
It was to be such a beautiful spree, 
But they've sent us to the Dormatoree. 

We had looked at choir boys on Sunday, 

We'd worn gym shoes to town on Monday, 

So it was a terrible spree. 

We had to pay both night and day. 

We were happy in our West Wing home, 

But evil deeds have made us to roam. 

We've cut out the airs, 

They've sent us up stairs 
To the Dormatoreee-eee. 



The St. Mart's Muse. 



A Lonesome Job 



81 




IS 



"BE I W& GOOD 
SUCH A LONESOME JOB 



[The above picture and this " po?m" werj found on MLs Thomas's desk .] 

Put this picture on your desk, 

Please drink its meaning in, 
So when we have not done our best 

To scold you won't begin. 

When we scream out on the hall 

Because we're feeling fine, 
And next morn hear that dreadful call 

"Report to me at nine." 

When we come creeping up the steps 

Upon that awful day, 
Brinley, Bacon, Latham, Converse, 

Composing what we'll say — 

And shivering at your door we stand 
With shaking hands and knees, 

Look at that picture on your desk 
And don't restrict us, PLEASE! 



Before Closed Doors 
Two maidens sleeping lie, 
The minutes quickly fly, 

A noisy rap 

An ended nap 
And now to do or die. 



62 The St. Maey's Muse. 



Two maidens swiftly run, 
Their toilet quickly done, 

A white skirt flung 

A middy hung! 
The race is just begun. 

Now up the stairs they leap 
And then prepare to weep, 
The doors were closed 
While these two dozed. 
Dejected in they creep. 



Lines Written on the Busts of Shak.espeare and Beethoven Glaring 
at Each Other Across the Stage 

Says Bill to Ludwig, "I cannot see how 

You dare with your music to make such a row. 

How then can I possibly write out this sonnet 

I'm trying to compose on my sweetheart's new bonnet." 

Says Ludy to Bill, "You are moto presto, 
Please repeat it Da Capo e Ritardando; 
My songs without words give far less offense 
Than your punky old verses without any sense." 



The St. Mary's Muse. 

Subscription Price One Dollar. 

Single Copies Fifteen Cents. 

A Magazine published monthly except in July and August at St. Mary's School, Raleigh, N. C, 
in the interest of the students and Alumnae, under the editorial management of the Muse Club. 
Address all communications and send all subscriptions to 

THE ST. MARY'S MUSE, 
Correspondence from friends solicited. Raleigh, N. C. 

EDITORIAL STAFF 1914-1915. 

Margaret Huntington Bottum, Editor-in-Chief. 
Senior Reporters 
Helene Carlton Northcott Sadie Walton Vinson 

Matilda Jordan Hancock Courtney Deforest Crowther 

Junior Reporters 
Eliza Dickinson Davis Mary Auning Floyd - Annie Sutton Cameron 

Pencie Creecy Warren, '15, Business Manager 
Bessie Anderson Burdine, '17, Assistant Business Manager 



EDITORIAL 



Christmas 

Laura Margaret Hoppe, '14. 

{It is a great pleasure to us to print this editorial, which we tahe 
from the lost and much mourned Christmas Muse of last year, which 
was happily found later on in the session.) 

The last day has been marked off the calendar, the last hour, the 
last, last minute and even the last second has passed, and the long 
looked forward to holidays have come ! What an event this is at St. 
Mary's ! 

Of course the anticipation begins weeks ahead, but the real fun 
starts the week before, when the trunks are brought down, and then 
what a rushing and scrambling begins ! 

There are so many things to do that one hardly knows where to 
turn first. The decorations for the Christmas entertainment have 
to be made. Miles of wreaths, as it seems to the makers, of cedar, 
the Christmas tree to trim and Christmas carols to practice. 

In the studio the young artists are busy doing leather work and 
designing all sorts of unusual presents. The girls in the Domestic 
Science Department are learning how to make candy and sweet 
things to surprise the folks at home during the holidays. 



64 The St. Maby's Muse. 



The Junior Auxiliary Chapters are dressing dolls, filling caskets 
and stockings to distribute among the poor. 

At the different tables in the dining room the girls draw names 
to see who will be the one to receive a present from them on the 
Christmas tree. These presents are in the form of "Knocks" and 
must not cost over ten cents. This is not an easy thing to do as one 
is called upon to give an original as well as appropriate gift, and 
such plotting and whispering as accompanies this procedure ! 

And now we have sung "On Our Way Rejoicing," our trunks 
have been taken to the station, we have said good-bye and wished 
every one a "Merry Christmas." 

The Muse also wishes to extend a merry Christmas and a happy 
ISTew Year to all ! 



Two Pictures F r ° m a Weekly Paper 

A little Belgian refugee sat on the floor opening a wonderful box 

tied with bright ribbons. Many queer American words were on the 

cover but they meant nothing to the happy child. Out of the box 

came a marvelous doll, dressed in truly American clothes, with real 

hair, real eyelashes and little shiny slippers with silver buckles. 

Never had there been such a doll ! Well, yes, perhaps in the big, big 

shops way up in the wonderful cities, but children never touched 

those dolls. And it was truly her own, her very own ! Dazed with 

the wonder of it all, the little Belgian girl sat motionless before the 

warm fire of the kind people who were taking care of her. 
******* 

"Christmas Ship, Bring Santa Claus to stricken Europe ! Dona- 
tions Received, Clothing, Toys, Money, Food." 

The words blazed forth on a brilliant poster with Santa Claus as 
the chief figure putting a beautiful doll into the outstretched arms 
of a little Dutch girl. 

Before this sign on the broad street of a great American city, shiv- 
ering in the blasts of cold winter and flurrying snow, stood two ragged 
little girls with drawn and pinched faces and a scraggy yellow cur. 

They lived in the slums where Santa Claus doesn't go and where 



The St. Mary's Muse. 65 



people are often very hungry, in winter especially, when the men 
cannot get work and prices are high. There isn't often a nice warm 
fire and sometimes, yes, they are sick and there can be no doctor. 

The little girls stood before the poster with their thoughts far 
away in the land of dreams — far away with the little Dutch girl re- 
ceiving the beautiful doll. 

"Gee, I wisht we was Belgian refergees !" wistfully sighed the 
older girl. 



ATHLETICS 



Eliza Davis. 
Our record in athletics this month is rather blank in comparison 
to what we hoped to accomplish. A week of snow and then con- 
tinuous rain have kept the courts in such bad condition that it has 
been impossible to finish the tennis tournament or play off the basket- 
ball game between the second teams of the two associations. 

Tennis 

The tennis tournament has resulted in the following choice for 

the finals : 

Sigma. Mu. 

Mott Wilson, J. 

Thomas, A. Waring, C. 

Alexander Brinley 

Only the first game has been played off, resulting in a score of two 
to one in favor of Ellen Mott. 

Tl^e Riding Club 

Some time ago the Riding Club was organized for this term. The 
only officer necessary was a president, and "Dick" Waring was 
chosen. About twenty-eight girls joining, the outlook was very prom- 
ising for a lot of cross country rides this fall ; but as we have not been 
able to get any horses, and, as the weather has been so bad, we have 
not been out yet. However, we still hope to get in a couple of rides 
before the Christmas vacation. 



66 The St. Maby's Muse. 



The Walling Club 

The Walking Club, with Annie Cameron as president, Agnes Bar- 
ton as secretary-treasurer, and Mr. Stone and Mr. Cruikshank as 
guides, have been the most active branch in the athletic department, 
this month. Bad weather has no effect on these merry hikers and 
any Sunday you may see them starting off right after dinner for a 
tramp of an hour or two. On week days they leave after school is 
over. Most of the interesting places around Raleigh have been vis- 
ited, among them Lake Raleigh, the Pamlico Junction, and the Old 
Soldiers' Home. 



OUR EXCHANGES 



Helene Nokthcott, Exchange Editor. 

What a pleasure it is to survey the collection of magazines that 
have poured into our exchange department for December. 

Both the inside and the outside of most of them seem to fairly 
bubble over with Christmas thoughts, joy, and merriment. Begin- 
ning with the cover designs, from bright and dignified wreaths, to 
bits of merry Christmas scenes, on and on through poems, stories and 
editorials, the spirit of joy, cheer and good will prevail. All are 
filled with that true Christmas feeling that makes "the whole world 
'kin." 

Among the finest and most interesting magazines for this month 
are the Wake Forest Student, the University of North Carolina 
Magazine, and the Quill. 

Truly the Wake Forest Student shows the proper spirit and help 
of the student body. It reflects the interest, hard work and enthus- 
iasm which are essential to edit a successful magazine. All of the 
departments are well arranged and the school notes are especially 
interesting. 

One of the best articles of this number is "A Defense of Capital 
Punishment." Four important arguments are given. First, that 
capital punishment is the easiest and most certain method of elimi- 
nating that danger of a murderous assassin from society. Second, 
that it is an example to others, therefore homicides are rarest where 



The St. Maey's Muse. 67 



the law is enforced. The third point brings out the thought that, 
since capital punishment involves the destruction of the criminal 
there is no need for reformation. It is the business of the State to 
secure and maintain safety for society. The last argument is that 
of humanity. Instant death is more merciful to the criminal than 
the long weary years of penal servitude. The writer brought the 
points out clearly and distinctly and showed excellent selection of the 
arguments. 

"The Eomance on the Kail," and "The Serve," two articles of this 
number, show great ingenuity and ability in short story writing. 

We cannot but see the trace in many incidents of the best efforts of 
the staffs, for improvement, and we most heartily congratulate them 
on their December magazines. 



A Plea for Ragtime Music 

Many people of sensitive and discriminating taste are deploring the 
prevalence of ragtime music. They regard it as cheap, flashy, vulgar. 
The fact that young people like to play it on the piano, that children 
like to dance to it, that soldiers march to it, they regard as a bad 
sign of the times. In their opinion the liking for ragtime is an obsta- 
cle to a higher appreciation of music. This, however, is not the 
opinion of all musicians. 

In a recent number of the Craftsman, Miss Curtis, who has done 
much to discover and bring to the knowledge of the public the beauty 
of the Indian folk-song, tells this anecdote of the Russian music 
conductor Savonoff: 

"The band at the hotel where he was staying had been playing 
serious music in his honor when something more popular was re- 
quested by one of the guests. With the first bars of ragtime the 
musician who had paid scant attention before began to listen cu- 
riously, then attentively and finally enthusiastically. He rushed 
to the leader of the band, 'What is this ? It is wonderful. So 
original, so interesting.' The leader smilingly explained that it was 
the 'real American music' 'I shall score it for the orchestra and play 
it in St. Petersburg,' declared the Russian with real appreciation 
behind the humor of the suggestion." 



68 The St. Mary's Muse. 



There is something to be said for the contention that ragtime is at 
least our contribution of real folk-music which America has offered 
to the world. Miss Curtis thinks there is ground for the assertion 
that ragtime as whistled and sung in American theaters, homes and 
streets received its first impulse from the songs of the Southern negro. 
She suggests that the negroes in time may have derived some ele- 
ments of it from the tom-tom and accented rhythms of Indian song. 

Taking as his text a recent newspaper interview, in which George 
Hamlin, the distinguished tenor protests against the flooding of 
America with cheap, hashy music, Arthur Darwell in Musical Amer- 
ica has lately endeavored to show that popular music is not such a 
bad thing. If we are frank with ourselves, Mr. Darwel thinks, we 
must all admit that we enjoy popular music in certain moods and the 
enjoyment is innocent enough. There is in all of us a primitive 
melodic rhvthmic sense which is bound to find expression. Even 
Beethoven is said to have often listened intently to the strains of a 
barrel-organ in the thought that he might learn something of advan- 
tage from it. 

This popular music is a matter of the feet rather than of the soul 
and is like popular government, "Of the people, by the people and 
for the people." The makers of these songs are born to this function 
as Beethoven was born to respond to the highest ideal music demands. 

As to ragtime having a deteriorating effect on the public, such a 
claim is absurd in view of the fact that it isn't the music which makes 
the people but the people who make the music to suit themselves. 
Popular music is not forced upon the people, it is created out of their 
own spirit. That which is creative is good. 

Whatever its origin and however much it has been vulgarized, rag- 
time is as distinctive as the rhythmic characteristics of Spanish or 
Hungarian music, and is as capable of use in musical art as any 
primitive musical material. Mattie Moye Adams, '15. 



ALUMNAE MATTERS 

Communications and Correspondence Solicited. 

St. Mary's Alumnae Association. 

Honorary President - - - Mrs. Mary Iredell, Raleigh. 

„ ,, „ . , , / Mrs. I. McK. Pittinger, Raleigh. 

Honorary VicE-Presidents - { Mrs Besgie Smedes i eaki W est Durham. 

President - - - - Mrs. Herbert W. Jackson, Richmond, Va. 

Vice-President - - - Mr.i. A. S. Pendleton, Raleigh. 

Secretary - - - Miss Kate McKirnmon, St. Mary's. 

Treasurer - Mrs. Ernest Cruikshank, Raleigh. 



IN MEMORIAM 

At her home in Wilmington, August the 23, 191^, in the eighty- 
fifth year of her life, Mrs. Catherine deR. Meares entered into life 
eternal. 

At a meeting of the St, Mary's Alumnae Association on Founders' 
Day, November 1st, the following resolution offered by Mrs. Charles 
Eoot was adopted: That a Committee be appointed to memorialize 
the services to St. Mary's of the late Mrs. Catherine deR. Meares. 

The committee begs leave to submit the following: That as pupil, 
teacher and Lady Principal, the influence of Mrs. Meares was deeply 
felt. 

While a teacher at St. Mary's Mrs. Meares gave the benefit not 
only of her beautiful voice but (especially in the chapel services) of 
her taste and appreciation of music. 

Called by the Rev. Bennett Smedes, D.D., to be the first Lady 
Principal, she, with him realized the responsibility devolving upon 
both to carry on the noble work so ably begun by the founder, Rev. 
Aldert Smedes, D.D. 

Her love for St. Mary's as a pupil (she was among the first to enjoy 
the advantages of the school) and teacher found its highest expres- 
sion in organizing St. Mary's Alumnae Association. For this all St. 
Mary's girls owe her a lasting debt of gratitude. 

The committee is authorized by the Alumnae Association to have a 
copy of this tribute spread upon the minutes of the Secretary's book, 



70 The St. Maby's Muse. 



to send a copy to the near relatives of Mrs. Meares and to St. Mary's 

Muse. 

Respectfully submitted, 

Mrs. George Snow, 
Miss Kate McKimmon, 
Mrs. Nannie Jones Ashe, 

Committee. 



Read! Mark! Act! 



The Editors wish to call the especial attention of the St. Mary's girls and the 
eaders of The Muse generally to the advertisements inserted here. It is a good 
>rinciple to patronize those that help you. Let the advertisers see that it pays 
hem to advertise in The Muse, and make those who do not advertise realize that 
t is their loss, not ours. 



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CHOICE CUT FLOWERS 

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Why Is 




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Advertisements 



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HIGH GRADE TOILET ARTICLES 
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Phones 228 

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ONE-PRICE MUSIC HOUSE 



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REGINALD HAMLET DRUG STORE 

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Phone 107 
PROMPT DELIVERY 



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ROYSTER'S CANDY A SPECIALTY 

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FISH AND OYSTERS 

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104 E. HARGETT ST. 

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I Cafe one of the Best in the Country B. H. Griffin Hotel Co.. Proprietors 



A MODERN NOVEL. 
Chapter I. 
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Man too. 

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Maid won. 

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SOUTHERN RAILWAY 

Premier Carrier of the South 



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Through sleeping cars to all principal cities, through Tourist Cars 
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as through trains. Electrically lighted coaches. Complete Dining 
Car Service on all through trains. Ask representatives of Southern 
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about various other special occasions. If you are contemplating a 
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Location Central for the Carolinas. 

Climate Healty and Salubrious. 

St. Marts School 

RALEIGH, N. C. 

(for girls and young women) 

SEVENTY-THIRD ANNUAL SESSION BEGAN SEPTEMBER 16, 1914 



SESSION DIVIDED INTO TWO TERMS. 

EASTER TERM BEGINS JANUARY 21, 1915. 



1. THE COLLEGE. 
St. Mary's \ 2. THE MUSIC SCHOOL, 

fers instruction in these J g. THE BUSINESS SCHOOL. 
? ' /! U THE ART SCHOOL. 

5. THE PREPARATORY SCHOOL 



Well Furnished, Progressive Music Department. Much Equipment New. 

Thirty-six Pianos. New Gymnasium, Dining Hall and 

Dormitories. 

Special attention to the Social and Christian side of Education without 
slight to the Scholastic training. 



For Catalogue and other information address 



Rev. George W. Lay, 
Rector. 



ST. MARYS MUSE 



OF 



ST. MARY'S SCHOOL 



RALEIGH, N. G. 




JANUARY 23, 1915 



The Voice of Long Ago 



Oh voice of long ago, 

Oh voice of the days gone by, 
The voice of things that have always been 

Since the dawn of eternity. 

You speak in the raging wind 

As it roars through the wild, dark night, 
In the sigh of the pines, in the drip of the rain, 

For your tones are infinite. 

You speak in the rush of the wind 
As it leaps down the mountain side, 

In the quavering note of some wild bird's call — 
In the sob and the moan of the tide. 

And whether your voice be soft, 

Or whether 'tis wild and grand, 
Your call is the same and its appeal 

Touches the heart of man. 

For the voice of nature awakes 

A pathos vague and dim, 
For down through the ages the voice of the wild 

Is calling, still calling to him. 

Eliza Davis, '16. 



ST. MARY'S MUSE 

RALEIGH, N. G. 



Published by the Muse Club at St. Mary's School. 
The Student Publication, and the official organ of the Alumnae. 



[Margaret H. Bottum, '15 Editor 

Pencie C. Warren, '15 Business Manager 

Vol. XIX. January 23, 1915. No. 7. 



School Notes 

December 12th: The Dramatic Club Play, 

The St. Mary's Dramatic Club presented "A Scrap of Paper," by Sardou, on 
Saturday evening, December 12, 1914, in the Auditorium. 

Every year it is customary for the Dramatic Club to give a play the last 
Saturday night before the Christmas holidays. Miss Florence Davis, who 
is head of the Elocution Department, chooses and directs the cast. She de- 
serves and receives a great deal of credit for her splendid work in the train- 
ing of the casts and the production of her plays. 

The story of the play is woven around a little "scrap of paper" which 
'causes many misunderstandings and mysteries by its failure to reach the 
person for whom it was intended. This brings about an unexpected termina- 
tion of affairs in which Prosper marries his beloved Suzanne and the wicked 
Baron carries off Louise while Anatole marries Mathilde, after getting away 
from the clutches of the old maid, Zenobie, who had other plans for his 
future. 

Adelyn Barbee was an attractive and much admired heroine while Elizabeth 
Garrison made a charming hero and acted her part well. Virginia Bonner 
and Josephine Wilson also acted their parts with much credit, as usual. 
1 The cast of characters was as follows: 

characters. 

Prosper Couramont Elizabeth Carrison 

iBaron de la Glaciere Jacksonia Watt 

Brisemouche (landed proprietor and naturalist) Virginia Bonner 

Anatole (his ward) Robena Carter 

3aptiste (servant) Kathleen Carpenter 

Francois (servant of Prosper) Rubie Logan Thorn 



72 The St. Mary's Muse. 



Louise de la Glaciere Josephine Wilso 

Mile. Suzanne de Ruseville (her cousin) Adelyn Barbee 

Mathilde (sister to Louise) Elizabeth Corbitt 

Mademoiselle Zenobie (sister to Brisemouche) Matilda Hancock 

Madame Dupont (housekeeper) Mary E. Cook 

Pauline (maid) Annabel Converse 

M. J. H. 

December 13th: The Muse Club Party. 

■ 
Mr. Cruikshank entertained the Muse Club on the evening of December 

13th in honor of the new members, and also in honor of Bessie Burdine, 
an enthusiastic and much loved member who was not to return to St. Mary's 
after the holidays. She will be very greatly missed by all. 

For the party the Muse Room was attractively decorated in Christmas 
tinsel, bells, and evergreen ropes. The spirit of Christmas rose in our heart 
as we beheld the beautiful little tree with its many colored lights. We wer 
happy to be gathered together and to enjoy Mr. Cruikshank's hospitality. 

Delightful refreshments were served by Mrs. Cruikshank and Miss Sutton 
consisting of charlotte russe, cake and hot chocolate. 

This seemed to us all one of the most pleasant evenings of the year at St. 
Mary's and it was with much regret that we parted at ten o'clock. 

S. W. V 



December Hth: The Elocution Recital. 

On the afternoon of December 14th an Elocution recital was given in the 
Auditorium under the- direction of Miss Florence Davis. 

The stage was attractively decorated with Christmas wreaths and Japanese 
lanterns were arranged tastefully, hung from stands, in the background. The 
whole effect was simple but striking. 

The program was as follows: 

Buying Theatre Tickets (a monologue) By Haffie Barton 

A Christmas Experience By Elise Stiles 

In a Shoe Shop (a monologue) By Annie Welsh 

The Gift That None Could See, a poem written by Mary E. Wilkins; rendered 

by Marjorie Hill. 
The Capitulation of Suzanne, a poem written by Eleanor Hoyt Brainerd an 

rendered by Elizabeth Sikes. 
A Christmas Chime, a one-act play written by Margaret Cameron. 

The program was well given and the girls deserve much credit for their 
good work. 

"A Christmas Chime," the chief number of the program, was a very at- 
tractive little one-act play. The scene was laid in the drawing room of 
the Terrill's country home. 

Joseph Terrill and his wife Gladys had each invited a guest for the Christ- 
mas holidays. The two guests turn out to be a young couple whose engage- 



The St. Mary's Muse. 73 



ment had been broken off by a petty quarrel. They meet at the Terrill's, and 
after several very humorous attempts to, keep them separated a reconciliation 
takes place. 
The parts were well played and the audience enjoyed it to the fullest extent. 
The cast of characters was as follows: 

Joseph Terrill '. Robena Carter 

Gladys Terrill Eliza Davis 

Dolly Wakelee Grace Murphy 

; Ted Owen Adele Stigler 

| 

December 16th: Mr. Patton's Address. 

Mr. Patton, who spent a week in Raleigh in connection with the Every 
Member Club and who frequently spoke on the subject of General Missions, 
was kind enough to speak to us for a short while in the school room on 
Wednesday evening, December 16th. 

Mr. Patton proved to be an unusually interesting and forceful speaker. He 
stressed the need of hospitals and hospital work in India where the most 
' horrible practices are undergone as cures for diseases, these superstitions 
lead on to the most untold of suffering. 

This is not the first time that Mr. Patton has honored us with one of his 
most edifying talks and we hope to welcome him again in the near future. 

S. W. V. 
December 17th: The Christmas Tree. 
J The Christmas entertainment was held as is customary in the gymnasium 
the Thursday night before we left for the holidays. 

.; As we entered a large tree stood before us in the center of the room fes- 
tooned with all the beautiful decorations that we associate with Christmas 
time. A little fence around the tree inclosed the many knocks, in the place 
of useful gifts, for each and everyone. Above the tree numerous streamers 
of red crepe paper were twisted and caught at the other end by ropes of 
cedar, which were looped across the corners and around the sides of the 
"Gym." 

Girls singing a carol entered the room at one side carrying candles, and 
.gathered around the piano where a number of songs were sung. 

After this, at the opposite side of the room, dear old Santy appeared out 
of the chimney of a little house, his jolly face all wreathed in smiles. He 
greeted us all with a hearty welcome and distributed his gifts and slams in 
his jolly good natured manner. 

After the last candy bag was given out, the evening was closed by the 
singing of the old familiar carols. M. J. H. 

January 5th: The Return of the Girls. 

On Tuesday, January 5th, St. Mary's once more welcomed back the girls 
after more than two weeks of Christmas holiday spent at their respective 
homes. Everyone seemed to have had the "best time ever" and enjoyed her- 
self to the fullest extent. 



74 The St. Maey's Muse. 



It was rather hard to take up school duties again but the day after our 
arrival the routine work began as before Christmas, and everyone settled 
down to work. One of St. Mary's mottoes is to waste no time but to "plunge 
right into cold water at once," as Mr. Lay expresses it. 

We were all very sorry not to see several of our old friends again in our 
midst but were glad to welcome some new girls. S. W. V. 

January 6th: The Epiphany Service at St. Augustine's. 

Several of the St. Mary's girls attended a very impressive service held in 
the chapel at St. Augustine's on Epiphany day at six o'clock. The service 
was conducted by Mr. Hunter, the Rector and the President of the school. 

On entering the chapel we found it lighted by a large star directly over 
the Altar. At the opening of the service the choir entered led by the Three 
Wise Men. They offered their gifts as they sang the old familiar Epiphany 
song, "We Three Kings of Orient Are." Mr. Hunter gave a brief but inter- 
esting talk. 

At the end of the service each person was given a wax taper which was 
lighted from the one light on the Altar typifying the Light of the World. 
The Three Wise Men passed among the congregation lighting the taper of 
the person at the end of each pew who passed it on to the one next to him, 
etc., thus typifying the carrying of Christianity by every person to some one 
out in the world. 

The music which was strong and beautiful as it always is at St. Augustine's 
was much appreciated by all. S. W. V. 

M. J. H. 

It will be of interest to the girls of last year to know that Courtney Crow- 
ther played the part of Santa Claus at the Christmas entertainment this 
year with much credit. 

Miss Urquhart was several days late in returning after the holidays on 
account of illness but has quite recovered again and is now on duty at her 
usual post. 

It was with deep regret on the part of all Miss Katie's friends that we 
learned of the accident which befell her during her visit to Fayetteville in 
the holidays. She is recovering slowly from her fall and though able to 
walk with the aid of a cane for a while it was deemed best in order to give 
her a more complete rest that she go to the hospital. We all hope for her 
complete restoration in the near future. 

We shall all be sorry not to have Miss Dowd at St. Mary's the next half 
year. She goes to New York on leave of absence. Mrs. A. W. Knox, of Ra- 
leigh, will teach piano in Miss Dowd's absence while Mr. Owen will be acting 
Director. Mrs. Knox was a graduate of St. Mary's in '84 and was for many 
years a very successful piano teacher. 

Miss Thomas, Miss Ricks and Mrs. Cruikshank spent Saturday, January 
19th, in Durham, where the Durham branch of the Southern Association of 



The St. Mary's Muse. 75 



College Women entertained the Raleigh members. A North Carolina Day was 
arranged and members of the Southern Association of College Women from 
all over the State were present. A very interesting program was rendered. 
It is of interest to us to know that Mrs. Cruikshank, the President of the 
Raleigh branch spoke on "Branch Aims for the Year." Miss Thomas was 
among the representatives for Higher Schools for Women who greeted the 
audience. 

It is needless to say how very much we miss all the girls who did not 
return to St. Mary's after the holidays. 

The Muse Staff regrets very much the loss of Bessie Burdine, the Assistant 
Business Manager, who has done her work in that capacity with much credit 
for the past year and a half. She was unable to return to St. Mary's from 
her home in Miami, Florida, where we hope she is stronger and enjoying her 
life there. 

The past week has been spent in the midst of mid-term examinations. 
Whether we passed or failed we are glad they are over! 

The many friends of the much lamented Rev. McNeely DuBose will be in- 
terested to know that a handsome marble altar will be placed to his memory 
in Trinity Church, Asheville, N. C. it is hoped by Easter. If there is anyone 
wishing to contribute to the altar fund the amount can be left with Rev. 
George W. Lay, the Rector, who in turn will forward it to Miss Woody, 18 
Starnes Ave., Treasurer of the Rector's Aid Society of Trinity Parish, Ashe- 
ville, N, C. 



Our Exchanges 



The Muse acknowledges with pleasure receipt of the following December or 
January magazines: The College of Charleston Magazine, Wofford College Mag- 
azine, State Normal Magazine, Pine and Thistle, The Training School, The 
Black and Gold, (Winston-Salem High School) Messenger, Tileston Topics, 
Wake Forest Student, University of N. C. Magazine, The Stetson Weekly 
Collegiate, Charleston High School Gazette, The Lenoirian. 

There seems to be some misunderstanding on the part of our exchange 
critics in regard to The Muse. We are endeavoring to get out these small 
issues semi-monthly, while the Magazine numbers are to come out quarterly 
We find that this method keeps the interest in school activities more alive and 
creates greater interest in our publications. 



76 The St. Mary's Muse. 






In Memoriam— Thomas Atkinson Lay 



All St. Mary's was deeply saddened, on January 27th by the unexpected 
death of little Thomas Lay, during the four years of his life the Rectory baby 
of whom both teachers and girls were very fond. On the Saturday precedin 
he developed a case of diphtheria, the first case of a contagious disease o: 
the School grounds this session, and though no serious results were antici- 
pated, following his usual practice in cases of serious contagious disease, th 
Rector at once had the little patient, with his mother and nurse, isolated i 
the school hospital for contagious diseases, and antitoxin was administere 
to him and to all the family, while a letter was sent to the parents of al 
resident students notifying them of the matter. 

Thomas had a severe case of the disease, but rallied well and was almost 
convalescent from the diphtheria when a sudden collapse of the heart action 
proved fatal. 

The funeral, necessarily private, was held Thursday morning in Oakwood 
Cemetery, with only the family in attendance, Bishop Cheshire reading the 
service. 

The Rector and Mrs. Lay and the other members of the family have the 
deepest sympathy of all the school, past and present, who know them, and 
especially of those who know of their devoted family life. 

Miss Clara Fenner well expressed the sentiment of all in the following 
In Memoriam, which was published in the Raleigh Times: 

"On Wednesday afternoon, after a week of suffering with diphtheria, 
Thomas Atkinson Lay, aged four years, youngest child of the Rev. George W. 
Lay and his wife, of St. Mary's School, entered into rest. 

"He was a most unusual child, intelligent, lovable and attractive, with 
winning ways and the sweetest smile. The influence of his beautiful short 
life will be lasting. He loved the chapel services and attended faithfully, and 
sang and knew the words of several beautiful hymns. On account of the 
nature of the disease the dear little fellow had to be carried direct from 
the infirmary to the cemetery and could not even be taken into the chapel 
which had meant so much to him in his little life. 

"At the morning service the whole school sang with full hearts and tears of 
sympathy his favorite hymn, 'Golden Harps are Sounding, Angel Voices Sing,' 
while his bereaved father and mother and the children stood outside. Bishop 
Cheshire held the service at Oakwood Cemetery with only the immediate 
family and a few friends. 

"This morning we all sang: 

'There's a friend for little children above the bright blue sky, 
A friend who never changes, whose love will never die; 
Our earthly friends may fail us and change with changing years. 
This friend is always worthy of that dear name He bears.' 

"And we are thinking of our little soldier of the cross who has gone before, 
and who will be in that other land ready to welcome us with his ineffably 
sweet smile. 

"'The Lord hath given, the Lord hath taken away; blessed be the name 
of the Lord.' " 

January 29, 1915. 



The St. Mary's Muse. 



77 



Athletics 

Eliza Davis Editor 

i 

. 

December 10th, Tennis Finals. 



Sigma 
Thomas, A. 
Score 2 to in favor of "Dick" Waring. 
Referee and scorer — Mott. 



Mu. 

Waring, C. 



Sigma 
Alexander 
Score: 2 to in favor of Anne Brinley. 
Referee and Scorer — Wilson, J. 



Mu. 
Brinley 



Although the Sigmas won the first game of the finals, the result of these last 
makes it two to one in favor of the Mus; and gives them the tennis champion- 
ship for 1914-15. This tournament, the first of the kind which has been car- 
ried through here in several years, was a success in every way. The games 
were sharp, snappy games, and a good sized group of spectators enjoyed them 
thoroughly. We wish to extend our congratulations and thanks to all who 
were concerned in the arrangement and carrying out of this tournament, and 
hope that it will become a yearly event at St. Mary's. 

December l^th: Basketball game between second teams of Sigmas and Mus. 

Line-up. 



Sigma. 
Chafer, 
King. 

Relyea (Captain). 
Wall. 

Ravenel. 
Allen. 



Forwards. 



Centers. 



Guards. 



Mu. 
Coles. 
Watt. 

Lay. 
Smith. 

Latham (Captain). 
C. Holmes. 



Score, 12 to 9 in favor of Mus. 

Referee, Miss Barton; Scorer, Agnes Barton. 

This is the first year in which the Athletic Associations have had regular 
second teams and played off games between them. We are proud of our second 
teams, and think they really deserve more consideration than they get. We 
want bigger crowds at these games. Everybody come to the next one — it 
won't be dull! 



78 The St. Mary's Muse. 



Here and There 

Breakfast Food. 

"Gee, got a splinter in muh mouth." 
"Uhuh?" 

"Yep; ate a planked steak for dinner and finished up on a club sandwich.'! 

— Exchange. | 

A young man asked a country squire what the letters R. S. V. P. meant ail 
the foot of an invitation. The squire with a chuckle answered, "They mean J 
Rush in, Shake hands, Victual up, and Put." — Exchange. 

Old Lady (irritably) — "Here, boy, I've been waiting some time to be waited! 
on." 

Druggist Boy — "Yes ma'am, what can I do for you?" 

Old Lady — "I want a stamp." 

Druggist Boy, (eager to accommodate) — "Yes ma'am, will you have it lickedl 
or unlicked?" — Ex. 

This appeared in a Northern paper not long ago: 

WANTED a man to milk a cow who has a 
good voice and is not afraid to sing in 
the church choir. Applicant must apply 
at once. — Exchange. 



Around School 

L. S. (Appearing with a book slip at the Post Office window) — "I want to get 
some money, do I sign this at the top?" 

E. A. (Falling on a chair ready for "Gym" work) — "And to think! I shall 
still be dressing for Jim when I go home." 

In Ethics Class: "What is your duty in regard to poverty?" 
S. V. (mournfully) : "To bear it patiently." 

Mr. S— "Who were tbe Goths?" 

S. G — -"Why, they were French." 

From the back row: "No, Sir! They were Turks." 

Practice Hall. 

Miss S. to Cadet: "Why didn't you come last night?" 

Cadet: "Er — a — I did but something was — er — wrong. I went where you 

told me to and got into a tunnel thing with girls sticking their heads out of 

stalls on the sides." 



Our Advertisers 



Boylan-Pearce Co., Dry Goods. 
J. C. Brantley, Druggist. 
Dobbin-Ferrall Co., Dry Goods. 
Edwards & Broughton Printing Co. 
Norfolk Southern Railroad. 
M. Rosenthal & Co., Grocers. 
The Tyree Studio. 

Atlantic Fire Insurance Co. 

Carolina Power & Light Co. 

King-Crowell Drug Store. 

King's Grocery, "The Little Store." 

The Fashion, Kaplan Bros. Co. 

French Hat Shop. 

Jolly & Wynne Jewelry Co. 

H. Mahler's Sons, Jewelry. 

The Office Stationery Co. 

Royall & Borden Furniture Co. 

Raleigh Department Store. 

Southern Educational Bureau. 

L. Schwartz, Meat Market. 

Taylor Furnishing Co. 

While's Ice Cream Co. 

Young & Hughes, Plumbers. 

Arthur, Fish Market 
. Blake, Jeweler. 
10s. H. Briggs & Sons, Hardware. 
California Fruit Store. 




Bernard L. Crocker, Shoes. 
Ellington Art Store. 
S. Glass, Dry Goods. 
C. E. Hartge, Architect. 
Hick's Up-town Drug Store. 
Hunter-Rand Co., Dry Goods. 
Johnson & Johnson Co., Coal. 
Johnson & McCullers, Grocers. 
O'Quinn, Florist. 
Thomas A. Partin Co. 
H. Steinmetz, Florist. 
Toyland Company. 
Wake Drug Store. 
Walk-Over Shoe Shop. 

T. F. Brockwell, Locksmith. 
Cardwell & O'Kelly, Cleaners. 
Darnell & Thomas, Music House. 
Hayes & Hall, Photographers. 
Heller's Shoe Store. 
Hotel Giersch. 
Pescud's Book Store. 
Raleigh Floral Company. 
Raleigh French Dry Cleaning Co. 
Misses Reese & Co., Milliners. 
Herbert Rosenthal, Shoes. 
Royster's Candy Store. 
Watson's Picture & Art Co. 



rhese advertisements will be put in full in the magazine number of the 



ST. MARYS MUSE 



OF 



ST. MARY'S SCHOOL 



RALEIGH, N. G. 




MARCH 22, 1915 



Inter-Society Debates 



There has been unusual interest shown in the inter-society debates this 
year. There are to be three, as there were last year. The Alpha Rhos 
hold the championship, having won two out of three. Competition is keen 
and each hopes to be victorious in at least one, while the Alpha Rhos show 
much determination to keep the championship. 

The outline of the debates is as follows: 

I. Resolved, That the present rapid change in fashion is desirable. 

Affirmative — Sigma Lambda: 

Ruby Thorn, '18. 

Courtney Crowther, '15. 
Negative — Epsilon Alpha Pi: 

Rena Harding, '16. 

Josephine Wilson, '16. 

II. Resolved, That the moving pictures are a greater educative force than 
the periodicals. 

Affirmative — Alpha Rho: 

Eliza Davis, '16. 

Matilda Hancock, '15. 
Negative— Sigma Lambda: 

Eleanor Relyea, '17. 

Frances Strong, '15. 



III. Resolved, That the girl of today is superior to her grandmother of 
yesterday. 

Affirmative — Alpha Rho: 

Katherine Bourne, '16. 

Robena Carter, '18. 
Negative — Epsilon Alpha Pi: 

Elsie Alexander, '16. 

Alice Latham, '17. 



ST. MARY'S MUSE 

RALEIGH, N. G. 



Published by the Muse Club at St. Mary's School. 
The Student Publication, and the official organ of the Alumnae. 

Margaret H. Bottum, '15 Editor 

Pencie C. Warren, '15 Business Manager 



Vol. XIX. March 22, 1915. No. 8. 



Lent 



I 

The Lenten season with its quiet and rest has come, and now our interests 
i have been especially turned toward missionary movements. The different 
; Chapters of the Junior Auxiliary meet once each week, instead of twice a 
month as customary, and the girls are busy sewing for orphanages and 
studying about mission schools. In place of the regular evening services 
on Wednesday and Fridays, voluntary services have been substituted, at 
which service Mr. Lay gives helpful talks on the different phases of sin. 

This is the season of sacrifice and self denial, when we give up our petty 
pleasures for those of. a more serious nature. A. B. K. 



School Notes 

Sadie Vinson, Matilda Hancock, and Courtney Crowther.... Editors 

January 18: Sophomore Party to the Seniors. 

On January 18, the seniors were delighted to receive the following invita- 
tion writen on attractive Japanese stationery: 

ear Senior Lady: 

Honorable Sophomore Class require your considerable presence at 
Japanese Tea Saturday evening, January 23, eight of the clock — Humble 
servants Sophomore class signify that Honorable Senior Ladies execute 
party in kimona costume. 
Hoping Honorable Lady assurancely negotiable, Yes. 

Yours truly, Sophomore Class. 



D 



80 The St. Maby's Muse. 



"When we, dressed in the Japanese fashion, entered the Muse room we 
felt as if by some miracle we had been suddenly transferred to Japan, 
"The Land of Flowers." Bowing down to greet us were the merry "Japanese"' 
sophomores, who invited us to sit ourselves on the floor. After we, prim 
and modest Japanese ladies, were comfortably arranged we were given the 
materials with which to make crysanthemums. The first one through was 
to receive a prize, so all of us worked vehemently to gain the reward, all, 
except Lanie Hales, were doomed to disappointment. She received a dainty 
box of Japanese stationery. But as a recompense for our failure to attain 
the coveted prize we were then given most delicious tea and sandwiches. 

January 19th: The Zoellner String Quartet. 

On Tuesday evening, January the 19th, the Zoellner String Quartet of 
Brussels, father, daughter and two sons, gave a concert in the St. Mary's 
Auditorium which charmed and held the closet attention of the audience. 

The Zoellner String Quartet is recognized as one of the great string 
quartets of the world, and the European success of this organization is 
being duplicated in America. 

The playing of the Zcellners is characterized .by a flawless ensemble, 
exquisite shadings and tonal beauty. One can see that from their child- 
hood they have worked in a paternal atmosphere which has brought about 
a co-ordination of playing and an astonishing unity of execution. 

January 21st: Dr. Pratt' s Talk. 

Dr. Joseph Hyde Pratt, State Geologist, gave us a most interesting talk 
in the school room on Thursday evening, January 21, 1915. 

He chose as his subject "Life." His message was to go through life 
not merely for what we get out of it, but for the part we play in the 
development of the world. Everything has its part in the development 
of the country in which it lives. As changes have been taking place 
for these many years to bring about the present condition of things zo 
everything continues to develop though we do not always realize it. The 
world is made with each of us as a part. We in the higher form of Life 
have control over the lower forms; should we not feel the responsibility and 
strive to do our best? 

Dr. Pratt emphasized the uselessness of worry, telling us that even 
examinations were not enough to make us frown, that they were for our 
good and that we should put ourselves in the position to get the most good 
out of Life and there is nothing that we study which will not prove of use 
to us at some time. 

The example which he gave of the man who smiles instead of frowning 
was Mr. Taft. Mr. Taft has not had an easy time, for his friends have not 
always backed him up, but it is known that he always wears a smile and 
makes himself pleasant in that way, and does he not gain by it? 

We enjoyed having Dr. Pratt with us and hope to welcome him again 
soon for not only are we duly impressed at the time he is speaking to us, 
but he gives us a message which lives in our minds. 



The St. Mary's Muse. 81 

January 23d: The Freshman-Junior Party. 

On January 23d, the Junior were greatly excited over the invitations from 
the Freshman class to come to the gym, "prepared to get all ragged and 
dirty." In spite of some secret fears about what was going to happen to 
them, the Juniors dressed in middies and bloomers, gathered in the gym 
promptly at eight-thirty, where they were invited to join in playing jump 
rope, "prisoner's base," and other lively games. Between games, lemonade 
and cake were served. The evening closed with the always-amusing "Going 
to Jerusalem," and then to the regret of every one the party was ended. 

M. A. F. '16. 

February 6th: Colonial Ball. 

One of the pleasantest entertainments which we had last year was the 
Colonial Ball given on the evening before George Washington's birthday. 
Everyone enjoyed it so much that it was decided we should celebrate his 
birthday in the same way this year but it was necessary that it should take 
place earlier, since the 22d of February was in Lent. So on Saturday 
evening February 6th, a lovely "Colonial Ball" was given in the parlor 
at 8:30. 

Everyone apeared in Colonial Costume and the Grand March led by 
Elizabeth Carrison and Matilda Hancock was very effective. Amid the lovely 
old-fashioned maidens and handsome colonial youths we enjoyed an evening 
spent in the manner of our grandmothers and great-grandmothers. 

We danced the minuet and the Virgina Reel until a late hour and after 
delicious cream and cake were served, courtly adieus were made and we 
departed. 

February 11th: Bishop Bratton' s Visit. 

It was with very glad hearts that we welcomed Bishop Theodore Bratton 
on Thursday evening, February 11, 1914. 

He took dinner with Mr. Lay, and although other appointments prevented 
his making us an address at this time he greeted us in the dining room 
after prayers with a few very appropriate words. 

On Friday morning Bishop Bratton gave us a brief but impressive talk 
in chapel on the "Readjustment of Ourselves to the Christian Faith." 

Bishop Bratton was President of this school in 1900 after Rev. Bennett 
Smedes, leaving here to become Bishop of Mississippi, where he now lives. 
He has been gone from us many years but he is still loved and remem- 
bered and his name is still revered among us. 

We were honored when he told us that he still wished to think of him- 
self as belonging to the school as it was here that some of the happiest 
moments of his life had been spent. 

Many of us remember his visit to St. Mary's last year and sincerely regret 
that he could not be with us longer this time, but we appreciate even the 
short time spent with us. 



82 



The St. Mary's Muse. 



February 12th: Miss Thomas Entertains the Faculty. 
Miss Thomas was At Home to the Faculty on Friday, February 12th from 
4:30 to 6 o'clock. Those who partook of Miss Thomas's hospitality were re- 
minded of the near approach of St. Valentine's Day by the decorations of 
hearts, red carnations and shaded lights. 

A salad course with oysters, sandwiches and coffee, and dainty cupid 
favors were served by Misses Warren and Peoples of the class '15. The 
young women demonstrated their culinary skill, for the guests learned later 
that they had personally prepared the delicious refreshments. 

• The guests of honor were Miss McVey, formerly Lady Principal of St. 
Mary's, and Mr. Dean, of the University of Cincinnati, and Bishop Bratton, 
of Mississippi, the former Rector of the school. 



February 13th: "Trial by Jury." 

On the evening of February 13th the one-act opera, "Trial by Jury," by 
Arthur Sullivan, was given in the St. Mary's Auditorium by the Chorus 
Class under the direction of Mr. R. Blinn Owen. Miss Ebie Roberts, 
pianist, and Miss Zona Shull, lyric soprano, assisted. The orchestra was a 
pleasing feature of the production. 

The lovely bride, Miss Robena Carter, wore a handsome white charmeuse 
gown and a soft veil. The bridesmaids who were dressed in varied colors 
and carried yellow chrysanthemums, together with the bride, presented a 
most beautiful and effective scene. The jurymen and audience thoroughly 
amused the on-lookers by their characteristic movements and costumes. 

An especially effective scene was the one in which the young judge who 
had fallen victim to the charms of the bride, sang "I Love You" to her. 

The parts were taken as follows: 

DRAMATIC CHARACTERS. 

Judge Miss Margaret Thomas 

Plaintiff Miss Robena Carter 

Counsel for PlaiDtiff Miss Anna Belle King 

Defendant Miss Frances Tillotson 

Foreman of the Jury Miss Lois Pugh 

Usher Miss Kathleen Carpenter 



Miss Margarite Sparks 
Miss Leila Hankinson 
Miss Lois Roberts 
Miss Katherine Smith 
Miss Clara Mardre 

Miss Constance Stammers 
Miss Mary Cook 
Miss Ottilie Maloney 
Miss Alice Adkins 
Miss Louise Arbogast 



Bridesmaids. 

Miss Adele Stigler 

Miss Frances Geitner 

Miss Agnes Cotton Timberlake 

Miss Elizabeth Corbitt 

Miss Elizabeth Copeland 

Jurymen. 

Miss Violet Bray 

Miss Marjorie Hill 

Miss Julia Smith 

Miss Helen Wright 
Miss Rubie Thorn 



The St. Mary's Muse. 83 



Audience. — Misses Buford Aiken, Dorothea Waring, Lee Edwards, Eliza- 
beth Gold, Katherine Drane, Elizabeth Walker, Josephine Myers, Ethel 
Smith, Katherine Elliott, Ruby Bartholomew, Virginia Allen, Emily Davis, 
Cimmie Barton, Aveline Mathes, Elizabeth Carrison, Helen Brigham, Mary 
Floyd. 

Scene and Place: Any courtroom. Time: Any time. 

February- l~>th: Peace St. Mary's Concert. 
Thuel Burnham, concert pianist. 

PROGRAM. 

Toccato and Puga, D Minor Bach 

Pastorale variee Mozart 

Impromptu Shubert 

Erl King Schubert-Liszt 

Carnival Schumann 

Prelude, Op. 20 Chopin 

Nocturne, Op. 37, No. 2 Chopin 

Valse, Op. 64, No. 2 Chopin 

Polonaise, Op. 53 Chopin 

Prelude .' ■ Rachmaninow 

Nocturne Borodine 

Hopak ..'.-.; Moussargsky 

Shadow Dance MacDowell 

Polonaise MacDowell 

February 16th: Dramatic Recital. 

Miss Florence Davis gave "Peg O' My Heart" in recital on the evening 
of February 16th in the St. Mary's Auditorium. 

The piece was exceedingly well rendered. "Peg" was charmingly alive 
and real in her delightful Irish character. Miss Davis displayed true genius 
in her unusually difficult production which was indeed a great success and 
which was enjoyed by a large and enthusiastic audience. 

"PEG O' MY HEART" 



A Comedy by J. Hartley Manners. 

DRAMATIS PERSONAE. 

Mrs. Chichester. 

Ethel, her daughter. 

Alaric, her son. 

Christian Brent, a social lounger. 

Montgomery, Hawkes, a solicitor. 

Jarvis, the butler. 

The Maid. 

Sir Gerald Adair, familiarly known as "Jerry. 

Peg, Mrs. Chichester's niece. 



84 The St. Mary's Muse. 



Act I — The Coming of Peg. 
Act II — The Rebellion of Peg. 
Act III — Peg o' My Heart. 

The entire action of the comedy takes place in Regal Villa, Mrs. Chichester's 
home, in Scarboro, England, in early summer. One month elapses between 
Acts I and II, and a single night passes between Acts II and III. 

We are delighted to note that Miss Katie has left the hospital and is now 
with her nephew, Mr. James McKimmon, in Raleigh. 

We have missed Miss Katie since she has been sick and she has had 
our constant thought and sympathy. It was a real pleasure to visit her 
while she was in the hospital for we always found her bright and cheerful 
and although she must have spent many tiresome minutes we do not know 
that her courage ever failed or that she ever complained. 

We hope that she will soon be able to come back to school. 

Everyone was exceedingly sorry to hear of Mr. Cruikshank's accident 
a few weeks ago. While trying to crank his car the crank handle sprang 
back and struck the lower part of his right arm breaking one of the bones. 
He was quite sick for a few days and we all missed him very much around 
school. We are glad to have him with us again and hope that he will soon 
have the use of his arm. 

It will be a pleasure to all to learn that Miss Lee is recovering nicely 
from a slight case of typhoid fever. We have missed her and shall be glad 
to have her with us again. 

Many of the girls are enjoying short visits home. 



Athletics 

Eliza Davis Editor 

Basketball. 

January 17th: Game between first teams of Sigmas and Mxis. 

c„- „„„.,„ Line-up , r 

Sigma * Mu 

Hoyce ) ( Walker 

t>,-~~ r Forwards j „ . . 

Rice i Brmley 

Thomas (captain) ) ( Barton 

Cameron j Centers Davig (captain) 

Mott ) j Holmes 

Robinson t Guards <^ Beatty 

Score 48 to 12 in favor of Mus. 

Referee, Miss Barton; Timekeeper, Alice Latham; scorer, Augusta 
Howard. 



The St. Maky's Muse. 



85 



January 24th and 31st games between second teams of Sigmas and Mus 
(played in two parts because of rain coming up first date). 



Sigma 
Cook 
Kincaid 
Allen, U. 
Chafer 

Relyea (captain) 
Howard 
Kincaid 
Allen, U. 

Allen, U. C. 

Howard 

Ravenel 



Line-up 



Forwards 



Centers 



Guards 



Mu 

Stammers 
Brigham 



Watt 
Collier 



Borden 

Latham (captain) 



Score 17 to 23 in favor of Mus. 

Referee, Miss Barton; Timekeeper, J. Wilson; Scorer, Hoyce. 

This closes the official basket-ball season for 1914-15 although we hope 
1 to get up some inter-class games later on. The championship, for the 
first time in several years, has been won by the Mus; and we need not say 
that they are very proud of it. They will do their best next year to sustain 
their reputation, and the Sigmas will work hard to retrieve their defeat. 
We have prospects for a good season with many of our players coming 
back. We wish to thank Miss Barton heartily for her earnest coaching of 
us, and hope we will have her with us again next year. 



Here and There 

"What is a girls' boarding school?" 
"An institution of yearning." 

Teacher (in 6-A Grade)- — "A session means a sitting, can anyone give me 
a sentence with session it it?" 
James — "The woman bought a session of eggs." 



How The Senior Did It. 
Senior — I was out motoring the other day. 
Freshman — So? 

Senior — Yes, and I came to a river, but could find no means of getting 
ly machine across. 
Freshman — Well what did you do? 
Senior — Oh, I just sat down and thought it over. 



86 



The St. Maey's Muse. 



Maud: "What makes Carrie so disliked?" 

Beatrix: "She got the most votes for being most popular."— Life. 

Prof, (shaking a boy severely by the shoulders) : "I think the devil 
must have a hold of you." 

Boy (solemnly). ' f He sure has." 

M: "I certainly do miss Lanie." 
A: "Yes, I miss Lanie so much." 
K. S.: "You all are so miscellaneous." 

L. R. (On history test): "Mr. S. may I speak to you?" 

Mr. S.: "Yes, but it will mean 5 per cent off." 

L. R. : "Why, most men will let me talk to them for nothing." 







safe ^~ 



1 



Our Advertisers 



Boylan-Pearce Co., Dry Goods. 
J. C. Brantley, Druggist. 
Dobbin-Ferrall Co., Dry Goods. 
Edwards & Broughton Printing Co. 
Norfolk Southern Railroad. 
M. Rosenthal & Co., Grocers. 
The Tyree Studio. 

Atlantic Fire Insurance Co. 

Carolina Power & Light Co. 

King-Crowell Drug Store. 

King's Grocery, "The Little Store." 

The Fashion, Kaplan Bros. Co. 

French Hat Shop. 

Jolly & Wynne Jewelry Co. 

H. Mahler's Sons, Jewelry. 

The Office Stationery Co. 

Royall & Borden Furniture Co. 

Raleigh Department Store. 

Southern Educational Bureau. 

L. Schwartz, Meat Market. 

Taylor Furnishing Co. 

White's Ice Cream Co. 

Young & Hughes, Plumbers. 

C. D. Arthur, Fish Market 

T. W. Blake, Jeweler. 
j Thos. H. Briggs & Sons, Hardware. 
I California Fruit Store. 

Alderman China Shop. 

Mechanics Bank. 



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'hese advertisements will be put 

MtJSE. 



Bernard L. Crocker, Shoes. 
Ellington Art Store. 
S. Glass, Dry Goods. 
C. E. Hartge, Architect. 
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Hunter-Rand Co., Dry Goods. 
Johnson & Johnson Co., Coal. 
Johnson & McCullers, Grocers. 
O'Quinn, Florist. 
Thomas A. Partin Co. 
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Toyland Company. 
Wake Drug Store. 
Walk-Over Shoe Shop. 
Yarborough Hotel. 

T. F. Brockwell, Locksmith. 
Cardwell & O'Kelly, Cleaners. 
Darnell & Thomas, Music House. 
Hayes & Hall, Photographers. 
Heller's Shoe Store. 
Hotel Giersch. 
Pescud's Book Store. 
Raleigh Floral Company. 
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Misses Reese & Co., Milliners. 
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in full in the magazine number of the 



We 

t Jttarp's' JIusie 



Mpvil, 1915 




# 



iHagajme Hunrter 



aaaletfifi, ii C. 



J AX** * mi 



The St. Mary's Muse. 

MAGAZINE NUMBER 



Vol. XIX. April, 1915. No. 9. 



Rejoice ! 



Awake ye ancient Heavens! 

And ye mighty worlds. 

Shout forth the tidings o'er the trembling earth! 

Ye, who but now, in awful wonder hushed, 

Beheld the God of Heaven lay down 

His life for sinful man. 

Awake! and ye, ye glorious stars 

Sing forth and shout with joy 

Until the quaking firmament resounds 

And the vast universe 

Re-echoes with your voice. 

And thou, soul of man, arise triumphant! 

Lift thou up thine head 

Long ages bowed beneath the yoke of sin. 

Behold the vanquished tomb! 

Behold it, rent asunder by the mighty God from Heaven! 

Behold the powers of darkness 

Quelled before the glorious Prince of Light. 

The Son of God is risen! 

And behold, freed from their bondage 

With Him rise the sons of men. 

There is no death, no woe, 

No tomb, no darkness more! 

Behold the Light burst forth 

Across the eastern hills. 

It is the Love of God, 

Awakening the glad earth 

And filling all the Heaven with radiance. 

Rejoice ye! for the darkness is o'er past, 

Terror and night are vanquished and are flown. 

It is the Immortal Day! Annie Sutton Cameron, '16. 



88 The St. Mabt's Muse. 



The Man's Easter 



Henrietta Morgan, '18. 

The wind was having a good time in the oak trees that spread before 
a large house. Even the violets in their prim beds were made to dance. 
All was wind — all that could be seen or heard was wind. So the man 
that stood before a window of the house observed to himself. 

"Yes, that's about all it amounts to," said he, "this thing called life — 
wind and rain. Set the tray over there, Maria." 

This last was spoken to the maid, very dainty in her apron, though 
she knew she was classed with the furniture. She now held out a great 
pink hyacinth. "I found it in the garden, sir." 

"You did? Well, — eh, you may have it." 

"Very well, sir," and the maid went out. 

Just then the doorbell pealed forth. 

The man frowned. With an unusually lithe step he went to the door 
to open it and called out: 

"Tell them I'm busy, Maria." 

"Very well, sir." Yet the girl stood still and waited to see the door 
closed. "I'm going to see who's come to see him," said she to herself 

The frown on the man's face clearly betrayed his annoyance when 
the maid came back into the room. "I haven't eaten anything yet. Never 
come for the tray until I call you," he said. 

He did not turn his head so he did not know that Maria was not the 
only person in the room. Looking up instinctively, he was taken aback 
by meeting a bright little upturned face and a mass of bright curls. 

"What do you want?" he asked. 

"You must say howdy do; 'cause I'm your comp'ny — Sibby and me," 
holding out a rag doll. 

"I should think you might go," he said fretfully. 

"But I've just come, Mr. Man. When Lorry and me plays comp'ny 
says she to me, 'It's time for you to go,' and I say, 'T$o, I'm goin' to 
stay all day.' But we are having the bestest time." And her laugh 
sounded strange in that house. "But have you got a place where some 
clo'es are to make Sibby a new dress out of — a natick?" 

"An attic?" And the man almost smiled. Then, "Maria, Maria," 
he called, "come and take this — this — this thing away." 

"Yes, Miss Maria, come and take me to a natick." 

******* 



The St. Mary's Muse. 89 



The man began to think. It was just such a March day as this when 
that wayward son of his ran away with the girl— the working girl — 
across the street. But death itself had been their recompense. The 
pretty little girl that was left behind — where was she now? He had re- 
fused to even consider taking the child. Yet now he began to wonder 
about the little girl ; where she was, if she had any dolls, if she had any 
Easter eggs Easter. Then came an idea; the man actually smiled. 
* * ****** 

The Easter sun had just arisen. The man was welcoming it, with a 
face still smiling. "I wish the church bells would ring," said he. "No, 
take that stuff out," he ordered the maid with his breakfast. "Then 
come back." 

A little later Maria was standing in the hall with her mouth and 
eyes wide open. She was holding a basketful of Easter eggs. "He ordered 
me to go over town till I found her and gave them to her," she said, 
dazedly. 

Maria was glad the doorbell rang. 

It was the little girl — and somebody else. 

"Mr. Man," cried the child, bursting into the library, "you've got 
two comp'nies. The other one saw when I was goin' to Sunny School, 
and says, 'Is Mr. Man at home that lives over there?' And I says, 
'Course, but he don't want to play comp'ny like Lorry and me.' But 
we just corned." 

The man needed no one to tell him who the "other one" was; the 
likeness in the eyes and face told him that. She was there — and the 
Easter Church bells were ringing. 



A Glimpse of Shakespeare and His Friends at the 
"Mermaid Tavern " 

(Senior Essay.) 

Melba McCullers, '14. 

If today, with our wide knowledge of the world's history, if today 
'twere possible for us to turn backward the wheels of Time and choose 
one age and only one in which to live, which age, of all the glorious 
ages of the past, which age would we choose? Would the "Glory that 
was Greece" lure us with its magic spell to choose those golden days 
or "the grandeur that was Borne" summon us as with the invincible 
trumpet notes of a Csesar to choose with him his victories and triumphs ? 



90 The St. Mary's Muse. 



~No, it would not be these ages, glorious as they are, but the age which 
we would choose with one accord would be, ah, would it not — the Eliza- 
bethan Age, that rollicking, daring, romantic, tragic, history-making 
age of Shakespeare! 

Despair not then, if this age you would choose, if you would hie to Mer- 
rie Englande in the days of "Good Queen Bess," for by a most simple 
way Time may be outwitted and we may yet live in that renowned age 
and meet face to face, as they appeared in real life, some of the most 
wonderful characters of that most wonderful age. And this way so 
easy — what is it? Merely this: Read "Tales of the Mermaid Tavern," 
by Alfred Noyes. 

This book of poems, so imaginative and idealistic throughout and 
interspersed with most melodious lyrics, splendidly embodies the genius 
and romance of the Elizabethan Age, the whole soul in fact, of Shakes- 
perian England finding in it the most ardent and vigorous expression. 
From boisterous humor to keenest pathos, and, very often, bitterest 
tragedy range the stories told in "Mermaid Tavern," that famous gather- 
ing place of Shakespeare, Marlowe, Ben Jonson, Beaumont, Fletcher, 
Raleigh, and other great Elizabethan figures — that center of good fel- 
lowship, wit, adventure, inspiration and sometimes tragedy. 

How thoroughly we enjoy these tales told here at the old "Mermaid" 
over the pipes and wine — enjoy them for the story told and appreciate 
the melody and color of the simple, ringing, dramatic verse with which 
it is told. Indeed, who could fail to enjoy the humor of "Black Bill's 
Honeymoon?" Black Bill, that bold, hardheaded sailor who, to satisfy 
his sweet tooth and to prove his point, that a bear had no sense, became 
entangled in a most remarkable honeymoon — or Avho could help being 
moved even to the point of tears, over the biting tragedy of the death 
of Marlowe. Marlowe the "Great God-blinded eagle-soul," the crimson 
wine of whose rich heart was spilt in a drunken brawl, was poured out 
for a taffeta gown. 

Yet, wonderful as they are in story and in poetry, it is not the tales 
themselves which impress us most profoundly, but the picture they so 
vividly present of the life of the age, and, more than anything else, the 
fascinating glimpse they give of those famous celebrities which makes 
us feel that they were after all only men, with all the faults and fail- 
ings of the race, very human indeed, but very lovable. 

As we read on, so vivid are the descriptions, it seems as if we our- 
selves lived centuries ago and knew these great men personally and saw 



The St. Mary's Muse. 91 



them in their every-day life as it centers in the "Mermaid Tavern." 
And the "Mermaid Tavern" itself ! How well we can see it, that ancient 
inn of millioned panes and crazy beams and overhanging eaves, "that 
inn with its worn green paint upon the doors and shutters, that inn 
before whose door a gaudily-painted siren of sea curls her moonsilvered 
tail among the rocks, enticing the weary traveler to the refreshment 
and gaiety within." 

And now we see them come! First there is one who seems familiar, 
"a figure like footfeathered Mercury, tall and splendid as a sunset cloud 
clad in crimson doublet and trunk-hose, a rapier at his side," "who can 
it be? Over his arm he swings a gorgeous cloak of Cyprus velvet, caked 
and smeared with mud as on the day when — Faith, 'tis he! 'Tis Walter 
Raleigh ! Joyfully we recognize him and with him enter into the old inn 
parlor, where, from out the maze of faces swimming in a mist of blur, 
up-curling smoke from the long Winchester pipes, there is one whose 
"bearded, oval face, young with deep eyes," gleams "like some rare old 
picture in a dream recalled," pale against the old black, oaken wainscoat, 
one quietly listening, laughing, watching figure whom Raleigh hails as 
"Will." 

The next face to become distinct from out the smoky haze is that of 
"Ben, rare Ben, bricklayer Ben" who, with his bull-dog jaws and grim, 
pock-pitted face with the T for Tyburn branded on his thumb, seems 
yet only some twenty years of age, that rare Ben Jonson, now growling 
out tales "that would fright a buccaneer" — telling how in the fierce 
Low Countries he had killed his man so had won that scar — now boasting 
of how he would startle London with the plays he was resolved to write, 
"plays of thunderous mirth," he declared, and now joking of how, after 
he and Will had built the perfect stage, Will had promised that he, Ben, 
should write a piece for his own company! 

How jolly is the "Mermaid" tonight until Sir Walter tells his tale of 
the "Knight of the Ocean-Sea," of the heroic way in which Sir Humph- 
rey Gilbert went down on his sinking ship, a tale which sobers the 
whole company and causes Michael Drayton to raise his cup and drink to 
him and to the other adventurous captains on the high seas who are 
daring all to make new discoveries for the glory of Englande. 

A few nights later what a different atmosphere pervades the "Mer- 
maid." For, hist, all night Ben Jonson and Kit Marlowe have been in 
the gayest of humors, singing songs of how the burly Sheriff of Strat- 
fordtown had once "gaoled sweet Will for a poacher," for stealing a 



92 The St. Maby's Muse. 



buck in Charlecote woods and carrying it home to the little white cot- 
tage of sweet Anne Hathaway. And now look, see how, just as Richard 
Bame enters, Bame the Puritan, who scorns all the frequenters of the 
"Mermaid," especially Shakespeare, Ben and Kit, feigning not to see 
him, begin to praise Shakespeare's "Venus and Adonis" and then break 
off in pretended surprise as they see "The godliest hypocrite on earth" 
(as Marlowe calls him in a whisper aside). Who says he brings a mes- 
sage from one of his former friends and companions in vice "who is now 
groaning in sulphurous fires," namely, Robert Greene, the message 
being his "Groats worth of wit bought with a million of Repentance." 
This pamphlet Marlowe takes, and as he reads with knitted brows "Trust 
them not ; for there is an upstart crow beautified with our feathers who, 
being an absolute Johannes fac-totum, is in his own conceit the only 
Shaker scene in a country" ; the quiet figure of Will enters and seats 
himself to listen. As Kit finishes, exploding with wrath, Shakespeare 
breaks in, bidding them read another testament in blood, written, not 
printed, for the "Mermaid Inn," the death-bed letter Robert Greene had 
sent straight to Shakespeare to be read by the "Mermaid" and then 
burned. This also Marlowe takes and reads, reads of the high ideals 
and tragic life and more the tragic death of Robert Greene, reads how, 
on his death-bed, he asks pardon of Shakespeare for "peacock phrase 
flung out in sudden blaze" for which he now so bitterly repents, con- 
fessing that his quill was but a jackdaw's feather, while Ben's had 
fallen through the azure fields from an eagle in the sun, and as for 
Shakespeare's, his was no earth-borne thing but the rainbow plume 
dropped from the wing of an angel! And when the letter is finished, 
naught can be heard save the wailing of the wind round the silent 
"Mermaid," which seems to voice the sigh of all for one whose life, so 
full of promise and literary fame, was misspent and cut short in its 
very prime. 

The silence is broken by the sneering remarks of Bame on Greene's 
one poor shirt and the surfeit of Rhenish wine and pickled herrings, re- 
ported to have been the cause of his death. ISTow follows a whispered 
conference (a rank conspiracy, in truth!) between Kit and Ben and the 
rest, after which, with mysterious air they bring forth paper and ink, 
saying they have a great secret, a wonderful plan, to propose to Master 
Bame; in short they have discovered a way to coin money, crowns, 
nobles, and even angels, and if Bame will join with them and lend them 
his honest face he will carry more angels in his pocket than he'd 



The St. Maby's Muse. 93 



ever meet in Heaven. A moment Bame hesitates, then seeing visions of 
malinsey-casks and silken hose and doublets slashed with satin (the 
price of which, 'tis said, he asked for many a moon thereafter!), then 
he agrees and signs. But here Kit pocketing the paper, says there's 
one condition for Master Bame; that he will breathe no more scandal 
on Robert Greene, for the day he airs Greene's shirt they will air his 
paper. Bame, without seeing through the plot, promises and murmur- 
ing, "why there's good in all men" departs, while behind him echoes the 
pent-up laughter which ceases, however, as Will tosses on the coals the 
last poor testament of Robert Greene. But Kit, the ever ready Kit, pro- 
poses that they give, with thumping chorus, the "Little Red Ring," the 
song of the "Mermaid Inn." How well they heed his words, for steel 
was never so ringing true as the chorus : 

"Well, if God saved me alone of the seven, 
Telling me you must be damned, or you, 

This I would say, 'This is hell, not heaven! 
Give me the fire and a friend or two!' " 

And so swiftly and gayly passes this night at the "Mermaid" and 
many, many other nights besides, nights in which as we follow them to 
their close, we follow them to the waving fortunes of the "Mermaid." 
For, alas ! that it should be so ! Time passes and with Time many of 
the old familiar faces we were wont to see gathered around the cheery 
board of the "Mermaid." Many have left its cheer and good fellowship 
never to return, many who do return, return like Sir Walter Raleigh, 
after his long years of imprisonment, old, worn, mere mournful shadows 
of their former gay young selves. As we close the book the last picture 
presented is indelibly stamped upon our memory, the picture of the de- 
serted "Mermaid" whose only guest is the now old and gray Ben Jonson, 
paralyzed in one foot but with brain as fresh as ever, who smoking in 
his old nook, seems to hear the voices of his dead companions, Will and 
Kit and Rob, seeming to hear, realizes that they are no more. As the 
lights grow dim and we see the great gray head of Ben bowed across 
the table on his arms and we know that he is weeping, weeping for his 
lost friends, we too, would fain repress our tears, but cannot. And too, 
like shadows, we creep sorrowfully away, while in our ears, to haunt 
for many and many a day to come, rings Ben's last song: 

"Marlowe is dead, and Greene is in his grave, 
And sweet Will Shakespeare is long ago gone! 



94 The St. Maby's Muse. 



Our Ocean-Shepherd sleeps beneath the wave; 

Robin is dead and Marlowe is in his grave. 

Why should I stay to chant in idle stave, 

And in my 'Mermaid Tavern' drink alone? 

For Kit is dead and Greene is in his grave, 

And sweet Will Shakespeare is long ago in his grave." 



Easter /Worn 



"Christ is risen," sings the bluebird, 
On the blessed Easter morn. 
And this song so sweetly given 
On the fragrant breeze is borne 
To the thousands who need cheering 
And who long for peaceful rest. 
Lo! a great, sweet peace has settled 
At this song, within the breast. 

"Christ is risen," is the echo 
Of the lilies tall and fair, 
Emblem of all truth and justice, 
Of all good and beauty rare. 
For the sweet bells echo always, 
And the children too all sing, 
That today, again, as all days, 
"Christ is risen, Christ is King." 



F. R. G., '16. 



Que vous ayez la Paix en Moi 



Elizabeth Atkinson Lay, '15. 

The road wound through the level valley of the Aisne, past the little 
village and up the steep hill above, wound on and on until it lost itself 
in the dark forest beyond. It was a well-kept road, broad and smooth, 
the villagers were proud of it and the children used to listen with won- 
derlit faces to the tales of the many splendors which lay far beyond the 
dark forest in which it disappeared from sight. It was an enchanted 
land to them, this fairy city at the end of the broad highway, and 
many and quaint were the questions which the children shyly put to 
the few chance travelers who came that way. Tourists were scarce in 
this out-of-the-way nook of Northern France. It was only in the 
summer time, and then very rarely, that the big touring cars were seen 



The St. Maby's Muse. 95 



in the little village. Lovers of art found their way thither often, but 
they were not like the folk who came in great fairy chariots and ordered 
every one about as though they themselves were fairy kings and queens. 
No, they were usually very ordinary in appearance and, though they 
were very kind and generous and quickly won the favor of the children, 
they were not at all splendid and dazzling like the real tourists. They 
had one point of superiority, however. The tourists gave little more 
than a passing glance to the two chief treasures of the villagers. The 
artists spoke of them in hushed voices; the dear little chapel which lay 
at the foot of the hill and the tall bronze shrine which stood on the 
crest. They knew as well as the villagers themselves the age of the 
church, they knew the beauties of its architecture even better. They 
listened eagerly to the quaint legend which the children loved to tell of 
the beautiful shrine on the hill, the wonderful figure which stood there 
brooding protectingly over their homes and fields. 

The sculptor had been a native of the village and, when he had left 
the place of his birth and had disappeared with the road in the cool, 
green forest, the people had spoken of him lovingly, nor was he for- 
gotten like most of those who, gone from the peaceful valley to the 
beautiful city, had never been heard of again. Many had been the 
tears shed for him when the news of his death reached the village and 
many had been the prayers that rose for him from the little chapel he 
loved so well. Then one day workmen had come and now, there on the 
top of the hill, flashing and glowing in the morning sun, stood the last 
work of the great sculptor. 

That was many years ago but the shrine still stood on the hill and 
the memory of the man who wrought it still lived in the hearts of the 
simple village folk, a memory handed down from father to son, a story 
old, yet ever new. 

It is the last of June, and the anniversary of the death of the great 
sculptor. The sun has not yet risen over the distant hills. Up the 
steep road moves a slow, stately procession led by the Cure from the 
little church below. Reverently, with bowed heads they approach the 
shrine and place at the foot of the Christ a simple wreath of wild 
flowers; kneeling they linger a few minutes, offering silent prayer for 
the safety and prosperity of their homes, then turn and proceed with 
quickening steps to the village below, leaving the figure standing with 
outstretched hands as though blessing the valley which it guards with 
such tenderness and love. There are many shrines in France, rude 



96 The St. Maey's Muse. 



wooden ones and some of beautiful bronze, carved or modeled, plain or 
elaborately decorated, some by the roadside, some in noisy cities, but not 
one so beautiful or so unique as this. The figure of the Christ stands at 
the foot of the cross with such an expression of protection and peace 
that it seems the very embodiment of the words carved above "Que vous 
ayez la Paix en Moi" — "that in me ye might have peace." How could 
it be other than peaceful in the little valley? 

******* 

Four months have passed and all is changed in the little village. 
There is constant commotion on the road. Huge motor trucks pass and 
repass the village, bearing ammunition and provisions from the supply 
station to the army across the river. Ambulances glide swiftly by with 
their load of wounded on the way to the hospital in the distant city. 
Old men and women work in the fields, little children are seen doing the 
heavy work around the homes, for the boys are working where strong men 
have toiled. The crops must be harvested, the land must be worked. Fath- 
ers and brothers may fall in battle or be carried, desperately wounded, to 
the nearest hospital; those who remain behind have not the time to sit 
and grieve, they must work, work and fight for their very existence ; work 
with tears in their eyes and hearts bursting with grief; work, nor ever 
stop to think or pine or remember. Ah, who says that work is not our 
greatest blessing? 

Far away a dull booming is heard above the constant rumbling on 
the road. The armies have faced each other for many weeks and fought 
with equal determination and almost equal skill but now — . Daily the 
sound grows louder, hearts heavier, voices sadder ! 

"The enemy has captured another trench ! They are pushing our 
army back farther and farther ! Soon they will reach the river unless — 
unless they are checked." 

Another day dragged wearily by. 

It is rumored that the French had attempted to retake their last 
trench — and failed. 

"A bayonet charge — aye, repulsed. Did they retreat? There were 
no men left to retreat !" , 

And then the sound grew very near. The inhabitants of the little 
village talked of their possible flight. 

"A ball from one of the enemy's field guns exploded near the river. 
It destroyed the farm of Monsieur Jacques. If they come closer we 
must flee." 



The St. Maky's Muse. 97 



All the world is shrouded in a dense mist, the village is wrapt in it, 
the sound of the guns comes through it, deadly, unceasingly dull. 
Through the dense gray wall which wraps the road comes a strange 
company — old men and women, babies and little children. As they 
pass the shrine with bowed heads the Cure pauses to offer a last hasty 
prayer. There at the feet of the Christ lies the wreath, now brown and 
faded. The sad little gathering proceeds, looking back wistfully at the 
beautiful figure which seems now to wear an expression of unutterable 
compassion and sadness. A sob rises to the lips of one old woman as 
the fog shuts off the sight of this last familiar landmark. They are 
facing the road to the city now with never a backward glance. Slowly 
they melt away into the mist, a grotesque crowd, sadly out of place 
in their gayly colored holiday clothes, carrying hastily done-up bundles 
of their greatest treasures, the silver buttons from their coats, a scanty 
store of money, a few clothes, a little food. What a weight of weariness 
and pain you take with you, you mothers and grandfathers and little 
children ! Will you ever see your little village, the tiny church, the 
dearly cherished shrine, your homes and fields, the hill and the broad 
river? Will you ever see them again? The only answer comes back 
through the mist, the piteous cry of a little child, the sob of an old man. 

The shrine stands there alone facing the sound of the guns. Louder 
and louder it comes. The houses in the village are falling now, the 
church is a smouldering ruin. The French have turned westward. The 
line is no longer straight, there is a narrow wedge penetrating deeper 
into their land. The Germans have reached the village, the houses are 
burned, the fields devastated. Only the river flows on, dark and swift, 
and the shrine stands on the hill. Oh, the irony of those words "That 
in me ye might have peace !" Peace ? Peace to the dead and dying, 
that is the only peace now. 

The fury of the battle has rolled off to the west. The Germans oc- 
cupy the hill above the now devastated village. Above the dark forest 
an army balloon hovers ready to give the signal to the gunners below. 
On the very highest point of the hill the largest and most powerful 
gun is placed. JSTow and again the earth trembles with the sound of 
its report. 

What is that mass of misshapen bronze lying farther up the hill? 
Look, here is part of a cross, a wayside shrine, no doubt! Bend over, 
trace the letters written here — "Que vous ayez la Paix en Moi." The 
village is ruined, the people fled, the guns of the enemy planted on the 



98 The St. Maey's Muse. 



hill send their messengers of death across the hills and yet one object 
remains to testify of hope, of peace, of love from all mankind to all 
all mankind, the peace for which He came into the world, the peace 
for which the world longs and waits. 



"The Little Colonel" 



VrBGINIA BONNEE, '15. 

The wagons creaked slowly on — great wagons filled with supplies and 
ammunition, getting ever nearer the firing line. It had been a damp, 
raw, foggy night, ghostly and weird. The only sounds that interrupted 
the subdued talk of the drivers, was the occasional whirr of an airship, 
far, far overhead. At the beginning of the thirty-mile journey, the 
distant noise of firing was heard but that had died out, many hours ago. 
Now, the dark clouds were lifting and the day was dawning. 

A strange, new day was dawning for one of this company. In a 
corner of the third wagon, among the huge boxes and bags of supplies, 
a little flushed face peeped out and two little hands deep down in the 
pockets of the khaki suit, tingled strangely. In all the terrible black- 
ness of the night he could see only one pale little twinkling star. During 
all his twelve years, the stars had been his friends but now when he 
needed them so, they had deserted him. He thought how his dear, 
lovely mother must be kneeling by his little white bed, praying that 
this little star he loved so would twinkle for her darling. At night, he 
and she used to kneel by the window in his warm, white little room and 
watch the stars, praying that they would smile down on their dear sol- 
dier, many miles away. When he left them, he said to his son: "Be 
brave, little colonel, be your father's little man." Oh! he did so want 
to be handsome and brave like his father. Every night his mother 
would hold him close and tell him all about the brave colonel and that 
sometime he would be a soldier, but not now, and how he must always 
obey orders and not be afraid of anything but fight and die for his 
Fatherland. The little boy's heart misgave him strangely as he thought 
of how he had secretly stowed away in the big wagon and left for the 
front. He wished now that he could look once more into the anguished 
eyes of the woman kneeling at the little white bed. 

As the train of wagons came over the hill into the full splendor of 
the rising sun, the boom of an exploding shell sounded so near that the 



The St. Maky's Muse. 99 



horses trembled and stood still. They were at the front. Surely, a 
strange, new day has dawned for you, little Johann. 

When the small stowaway was discovered, he was taken at once to 
the general, who was much surprised and disturbed at the appearance 
of a child among them. As he was there, he would have to stay, al- 
though the gruff old general disliked the use of children in the army 
and especially of this child, the son of his favorite colonel. The child 
quickly found a hundred things to do and his way into the hearts of 
his companions. There was no active fighting here at present. The 
men had been lying in the trenches several days, expecting the approach 
of the enemy. They were suffering untold hardships ; the light snow was 
melting and soaking the ditches. The men were caked with dirt and 
injured. Occasionally a shell dropped in their midst, killing some and 
wounding others so that they had to be taken to the rear to await the 
wagon from the temporary hospital. Little Johann was a tender, sympa- 
thetic nurse for the poor fellows ; many a pillow did he make out of an 
old coat ; many a drink he carried to the dying men or wrote last words 
home for them. His little, shrinking heart began to get used to the 
bloody bandages, the horrible bleeding wounds and the sight of the 
suffering and dead. 

Finally, a day came when the men in the trenches opened fire. The 
boy had never ventured far among them but now he had plenty to do, 
filling the buckets with cartridges, dragging the heavy pails up and 
down the trenches and sometimes loading an extra gun. He gradually 
got further and further into the firing line. All the blood in his little 
body surged with the desire to do something worthy, above all, to obey 
the noble colonel's last words, "be your father's man." The soldier at 
the telephone was sprawling on the ground receiving and giving mes- 
sages. Johann carried many in different directions. As he came near 
the telephone once more, the man had an urgent message for the general : 
"The enemy was advancing." The general must know it on the instant. 
Johann must take the message. He must go across the open field under 
the enemy's fire. The boy looked far across the field where his be- 
loved general was stationed. With the note he sped across the ground, 
across the ditches, through the trenches until he reached the edge of the 
open field. There he dropped down quickly and began his long struggle 
across the field. Lying flat with his face down, he dragged himself, 
slowly, painfully on, on, on. The sand filled his eyes and mouth; the 



100 The St. Maey's Muse. 



shot whizzed around him. Every minute, he thought would he his last, 
but he just would not give up until he reached his general. 

The men around their leader saw something little and gray, like the 
earth, moving slowly, but surely moving towards them. A great fear 
struck them. One man sprang forward and was picked off by the op- 
posite fire. The general commanded no other man to move lest the little 
figure should be discovered. The little bleeding form came nearer and 
nearer. ISTot until he was almost at his general's feet, did the boy stop. 
The little body raised itself — held up a note — and dropped limply, 
pierced by a bullet. 

In the little bedroom, thirty miles away, a young mother, pale and 
dry-eyed, knelt by a small, white bed. Crushed close to her heart was 
a white sheet with a red cross at the top. Many times over she de- 
voured the few words on it : 

"Don't cry darling mother. Tell father I was his little man." 

They were the last words of the little colonel. 



A Soldier Dreaming 



Margaret Thomas. 

Out of the darkness there came shots, sometimes so near that they 
brought an attendant flash. Somewhere out in space cannon boomed 
incessantly. Grayness superseded the dense darkness. All around him 
were forms kneeling and reeling. The high wall of the trench arose 
above him until lost in the mist and dampness. The soldier stirred, 
his eyelids fluttered, then closed again, but the scene was a familiar one. 

Once again he was running along sweet old English lanes. The 
hedges on either side were filled with sweet smelling honey suckle and 
wild roses. Up above the clouds were rose pink with little jagged edges 
of gold. A little girl with black bobbed hair and wide questioning eyes 
ran beside him. They were racing. They ran across a rustic bridge 
but with childish impulse stopped to bathe their faces and hands in 
cool water. The sun shone out from behind the clouds and touched 
the water with gold. In his boyish fancy he likened himself to Eang 
Midas. Just over the hedge in the meadow the primroses grew as thick 
as a carpet of yellow velvet. A black bird with a yellow beak alighted 
on the hedge and his singing filled the dawn with rapture. A big white 
house stood at the end of the hedge, and there was a rose garden sur- 



The St. Mary's Muse. 101 



rounding it. As they drew near, a lady with, tender eyes came down the 
path. She held out her arms and he ran to her, yellow curls and 
chubby legs flying, and blue eyes sparkling. "Mother !" he cried — "My 
dear little boy," she said. But the scene faded and a man, a child once 
more, stirred. Tears of angry disappointment filled his eyes, a twinge 
of pain had brought him back to reality. It ran like a needle through 
him and he lapsed into oblivion. 

But from the darkness another scene arose to greet his longing eyes. 
First he saw a glimmer, then the motion of something, then sunlight on 
fastly moving and undulating water. Once more he was at the head of a 
long boat, facing twelve men each face tensely grim with excitement of 
the race. The poignant memory of how he had suffered, not because of 
a broken arm but because he could not row again assailed him. But 
his position was a mean one, and they had said his vigilance Won the 
race for Oxford that day. He looked into the face of the wildly cheer- 
ing crowd and thought "Well — I helped !" Two faces stood out from 
all the rest. His silver-haired mother and the girl he loved. The black 
bobbed hair now being below her waist, but you couldn't have told it 
under the small hat she wore. Anyhow, her blue eyes were the same and 
they exactly matched his violets on her dress. They started towards him, 
and he hurried to meet .them but the distance lengthened instead of 
shortening until finally her eyes were the only distinct things he could 
see. He awoke to find himself flat on his back with a few stars shining 
up above like hers had shone except that they seemed horribly cold and 
glittering and made him realize how alone and cold he was. It was 
grayer than before, and over in the east there was a suspicion of orange. 
But the pain dulled his senses and once more he dreamed ! 

It was moonlight and there was thousands of stars now, and he was 
standing up instead of lying down. The fragrance of roses came to him 
and turned to find a tall girl standing beside him. "Dear little girl !" he 
said inconsistently, but very tenderly. "Look," she said, pointing to the 
sun dial in front of them. "It says I only mark the hours that shine. 
Just think of these it is missing." 

The next scene came more quickly. With a clash of arms and a flash 
of red came his regiment down the street. The women and what men 
there were left cheered, and everyone seemed confident and happy. The 
sun shone down, and was reflected against shining arms. It flashed in 
Iris eyes and blinded him. "What a nuisance," he thought. But in- 



102 The St. Maby's Muse. 



stead of being on his horse's back he was on his own, with the blinding 
rays of the sun on him. 

With difficulty he moved his head. Everything was quiet. After- 
wards he remembered wondering if he was not oversleeping and why 
those men stretched out all around him were not up. But he didn't care 
much. A delicious lassitude stole over him, and the sun bothered him 
no more. Neither did the dead soldiers. He was ascending steadily on 
rows and rows of white clouds. A cloud for his pillow and one for his 
covering. Everything around him was white, except a spot of black 
which purchance framed the face of some good angel. Familiar blue 
eyes looked into his and a familiar voice said : "I believe he is gaining 
consciousness." "Betty," he whispered in amazement, "Are we in 
heaven together ?" Then two arms went around him, and he saw not an 
angel but Betty in the dress of a Red Cross nurse, and he knew he was 
in heaven indeed. 



Extracts from a College Girl's Diary 



Nettie Gaithee. 

September 20. — College at last ! After so many months of hoping, 
fearing and longing, I am here. My trip was very commonplace and 
tiresome, not an incident to draw my thoughts from my destination. A 
rather interesting young man did get on at one stop, but it wasn't five 
minutes before I heard an old lady ask him if the baby was well ! Here 
ended the excitement. 

How strange everything seems here. I wonder if it will always be so, 
and if I will ever become accustomed to order and punctuality. I am 
sadly afraid I will not. I feel so small and insignificant. In a big 
brick house, there's a big white hall, in the big white hall there's a big 
white room, in the big white room there's a little "green" thing, and the 
little green thing is "me" ! I've been here four whole days and I haven't 
been homesick but five times, that is, I haven't had "spells" (as Mar- 
garet Smith says!) but five times. The girls have been so nice to me 
and Margery Arnold is such a lovely girl to have for a room-mate, that 
I am sure there are good times ahead of us. Our "first aid" to the 
homesick is to make the first mourner sing a laundry list to the tune 
of "Home, Sweet Home." The music at times, is rather doleful and 
has a pathetic note, but it does help. 



The St. Mary's Muse. 103 



The last light has flashed, and in a few minutes Miss Taylor will 
have her head in the door. Margery already has hers under the cover. 

October 2. — Just in from a game of tennis with Margery, Sallie 
Ferris, and that Smith girl. Somehow I don't like her and I can't un- 
derstand why Sallie insists on having her tag along. I don't care if 
she is from JSTew York. She actually says "git." Yesterday, when sev- 
eral of us were discussing our various studies she announced her great 
joy at not having to study geography. She said she always had hated it, 
even when she went to Grammar School and studied Maury's "Em- 
manuel" — well I just had to leave the place before I burst out laughing ! 

We are going to have a basket ball game Friday and we are so 
excited. If we win we are going to give our team a spread. It is time 
for my violin lesson so I must hurry or Miss Winston will be "hot 
footing it" after me. Yesterday our English teacher said we must stop 
using so much slang, she said we must "cut it out !" 

November 1. — Today three wonderful things happened, and we are 
holding our breath in fear of the consequences : 

1. Marie Holmes missed a fourth of a question in English. 

2. Rosalie Thorn shut a door. 

3. Dorothy Hines was on time for class. 

All this in one day is too much of a shock ; lam unable to write more. 

November 20. — Margery has a brother! That horrid girl has de- 
ceived me. Every time I have asked her about her family she has al- 
ways changed the subject immediately, and I thought some of them 
must be queer and she was sensitive about them ! She says she was 
saving him as a surprise because I am going to spend Thanksgiving with 
her. Gracious ! I certainly am glad I found it out. I think I'll take 
my steamer trunk instead of a suitcase. His name is Jack, and she 
showed me his picture, or rather I found it. He's awfully handsome. 

December 16. — There is so much excitement in the air that I can 
hardly sit still long enough to scratch these few lines. In just four 
more days I'll be flying South on the "Limited" and leave these "bare 
walls" behind me, although that can hardly apply to our room. 

Margery and I tried the roof walking stunt last night and nearly froze. 
Margery hurt her foot, I skinned my knee, and both came near being 
caught by Miss Taylor, when we started down the fire escape. Two of 
the girls were caught the night before, one of them was that Smith girl 



104 The St. Maey's Muse. 



and Sallie bet Margie and I that we couldn't take an "airing" without 
being caught. We won so she took us down town and treated us. Al- 
most Christmas too — awfully good natured of her, I think. 

January 10. — Well, here I am again — back at school after the hap- 
piest Christmas I ever had. Almost all of the girls have the "blues" 
and their faces could be measured with a yardstick. Margery and I 
have been so busy "dressing up" our room in our new possessions that 
we have scarcely had time to be blue but I suppose it will come! I 
didn't feel exactly happy though Phil told me goodbye — I wonder why — -. 
It was very nice of him to come back with me but I do believe he thinks 
this ought to be a co-ed school. 

I got off the best joke on the girls when I came back Tuesday. On the 
train with me was a very attractive young girl, who was coming here, 
so, as soon as I arrived I told the girls about her. They were greatly 
excited and upon finding that she was to occupy the vacant room in 
their hall they were anxious to get acquainted with her at once. 
I told them they had better go slow, that she was very reserved and 
proper, so in a flash they determined to haze her! Sallie Ferris and 
!N"an Evans rushed over to the vacant room, while Margery and Nell 
Keys on a large piece of paper proceeded to print "rules." I must 
record them here in case I forget them. 

KULES. 

"When a member of the faculty speaks to you, curtsey immediately. 
Invariably address a senior by the title of "Miss." During meditation 
hour on Sunday think over your sins of the past week, if repentant, 
answer "rep" at evening roll call, if not, answer "non-rep." 

"To take more than one biscuit at breakfast is considered a breach 
of etiquette, punishable by five demerits." 

These were read to us then tacked on the wall in the "new girl's" 
room. The girls came back announcing that they had made a pie-bed, 
hidden her bureau keys, and that the rules looked stunning- just be- 
fore Miss Winston, with the "new girl" came down the corridor and 
met Miss Taylor at the door. "Pretty thick with the faculty already," 
came from ISTan behind me, and from the hall came Miss Winston's 
voice, "Miss Taylor let me introduce Miss Herbert, our new Greek 
teacher, you know, who is to take the place of Miss Stone." Miss Taylor 
shook hands with the "new girl" and the three walked into the vacant 



The St. Mary's Muse. 105 



room, while I turned just in time to see Margery collapse into a chair 
like a jack-knife, Nan leaning limply against the wall, tearing her hair, 
and Sallie and Nell standing thunderstruck in the middle of the floor. 
Then I rolled on the bed in hysterical giggles. 

March 20. — Last night we were awakened from our peaceful slumbers 
by the cry of "Fire! Fire!" Margery and I sprang up catching my 
sweater and her hat as we rushed into the hall, which was filled with 
girls in gay and grotesque costumes. Louise who had given the alarm 
was calling "Oh girls run, run;" while Miss Coles rushed out with a 
bottle of red ink to quench the flames as she often does our lurid love 
stories. "Where's Mary," called Elizabeth, flying back to find Mary, 
Nell, Katherine and Nan on their knees searching for Mary's red ban- 
dana. "But where is the fire?" called some one, and Louise, in a 
sheepish voice, answered : "Well girls, I must have had a nightmare." 
Margie and I both have colds as my sweater hadn't very great pro- 
tective power, and she couldn't keep her hat on because she didn't 
have a hat pin. 

April 15. — Yesterday Jack sent me a beautiful Yale banner, and it 
now adorns the most prominent side of our room. Margie declares she's 
getting jealous, and I don't blame her a bit, but I wouldn't let her 
know it for anything. I don't blame her, I think I'd be jealous too, 
if I had a brother as nice as Jack. But I'm awfully glad he isn't my 
brother because then — Oh, heavens, there goes the last flash. 

November 22. — I've just finished a long paper on "What has the Col- 
lege done for girls, and how can it be bettered?" and I wrote from my 
heart "more of the practical side of life, less Hygiene, less Latin, less 
Mathematics." I was very eloquent in my appeal for my suffering sisters 
and I felt so exalted and noble when I finished — I suppose I'll feel suf- 
ficiently humbled when I see the mark I get on it ! 

I received a box from home yesterday and what a spread we had last 
night ! Just as we were about ready to start and the coffee was real hot 
we heard a step in the hall ! Nan switched off the light, Margery snatched 
up the coffee pot and wrapped a kimona around it to keep it from 
smelling, while we rolled, some in the bed and some under it. The 
excitement was soon over, however, and we did'nt leave many crumbs for 
the mice. Speaking of mice, reminds me of that Smith girl. She got 
a box last week and hid it under her bed without giving anybody one 






1C6 The St. Mary's Muse. 



lemon drop. Yesterday she opened it to find that the mice had nibbled 
everything in it, and one had choked to death on a piece of candy, and 
the maid had to throw everything away. We celebrated by eating some of 
Dorothy's grape fruit. I believe I've got a bad disposition. 

December 22. — I am so lonesome I am nearly dead, no orphan asylum 
could be more dismal than this when all the girls are away! If only 
little Betty had postponed her case of diphtheria. There is hardly a 
soul left here and I just don't know what to do with myself. Jack is 
coming Christmas evening and I guess that will help some. It's the 
best feeling in the world to see somebody you know, when you can't get 
home for Christmas. Yes, I am quite sure Jack will help a little. 

December 29. — I never thought I could spend such a happy Christ- 
mas away from home. Jack and I went for a long walk in the evening, 
then we had supper, and afterwards had a nice long talk in the parlor — 
Jack told me some of the queerest things. He did help quite a lot, and 
I really believe I hated to see him go. 

February 15. — Yesterday I got a large heart-shaped box of candy 
and in it was a card bearing this verse in Jack's handwriting: (He's 
a poet on a small scale.) 

"Stolen! by a maiden fair, 
With smiling eyes and sunny hair, 
My heart! the only one I had — 
Was ever there a case so sad?" 

I think it's very pathetic. Margie insists that I furnish him with a 
new one, but really I don't believe I have it to spare if I had to steal 
one for myself. 

May 19. — I'm glad, and yet it makes me sad to think that my last year 
of college life is drawing to a close. These have been busy, but very 
happy years that the "little green thing" has passed in "the big brick 
house." With my diploma as a background I had intended to be a 
great art teacher but I didn't count on Jack. He says he feels that 
he needs an art course terribly and that he would be a very apt pupil. 
I'm not so sure about that and besides I'm afraid teaching art to one 
pupil wouldn't be a very profitable business. 

The room is filled with lovely flowers; both mine and Margery's. 
Jack sent me white American Beauties with one red one among them. 
I have promised him an answer tomorrow. If I wear the red one with 
the white ones it means "yes," if I leave it out — oh ! I wonder what I'll 
do! Jack is coming this afternoon and I'm so excited. Phil will be 



The St. Maey's Muse. 107 



here tomorrow, too, but his eyes will be upon another face and another 
bunch of flowers — Margery's. I didn't know what I was doing when 
I had them both on the same house party ! That was hardly three years 
ago and — well the ways of Fate are inexplicable ! Gracious ! the maid has 
just come in with Jack's card. I'm afraid I've already decided to wear 
the "Red, Red, Rose." 



SCHOOL NEWS 



The Lenten Services 

The Lenten services this year have been especially helpful. As is the 
Lenten custom, on Wednesday and Friday evenings, shortened evening 
prayer has been held from six to six-thirty and at each of these services 
there has been a short address by the rector. 

One who has not heard them cannot know how helpful they have 
been. The general subject was "Sin," and in the clear treatment of the 
various phases of sin; its subtle beginnings; its deadly effects, and its 
disastrous consequences, there was brought home to us anew the reality 
of evil and the necessity of fighting against it, together with many 
useful suggestions for practical use in every-day life. 

Among the most helpful were the talks on "The Analysis of Sin," 
"Repentance," "Habits," and "The Hatefulness of Sin." 

The one service that the rector was absent was held by the Rev. Mr. 
Willcox, who gave a very impressive talk on the strong points in the 
character of Jesus Christ as a man, as suggested by the Beatitudes. 

On Palm Sunday at the morning service, the rite of holy baptism 
was administered and at the evening service Bishop Cheshire made his 
official visitation and administered the rite of confirmation. 

During Holy Week, the Holy Communion was celebrated every morn- 
ing except Friday, and short evening services were held, following the 
events of these last days of our Lord's life. 

All these services were voluntary and how helpful they have been 
has been shown by the unusually good attendance. 

If our Easter this year is glad and joyous, it is certain that these 
services, with their helpful influences for the faithful keeping of a good 
Lent, have had no small part in making it so. 



108 The St. Mary's Muse. 



The Inter-Society Debates 

One of the most important and interesting events of the school year 
at St. Mary's is the series of inter-society debates held annually. There 
are now three debates and each society debates twice. The champion- 
ship is given to the society which wins two debates. The Alpha Rho's 
were champions in 1914. 

The first of the inter-society debates was held in the auditorium on 
March 15, 1915, between the Epsilon Alpha Pi' and Sigma Lambda 
Literary societies. Miss Matilda Hancock of the Alpha Rho Society 
presided. 

The query was : ^ 

Resolved, That the present rapid change in fashion is desirable. 

The affirmative was upheld by the Sigma Lambda Society, repre- 
sented by Miss Ruby Thorn, '18, and Miss Courtney Crowther, '15. The 
negative was upheld by the E. A. P. Society represented by Miss Jose- 
phine Wilson, '15, and Miss Rena Harding, '16. 

The judges were Miss Leatherman, of the State Library, Mr. Metcalf 
of A. and M. College, and Mr. fm. C. Harris. The decision was made 
in favor of the negative. 

The second of the debates was held on March 22, 1915, between the 
Sigma Lambda and Alpha Rho Literary societies. Miss Margaret 
Bottum, president of the Epsilon Alpha Pi Society presided. The 
query was : 

Resolved, That the moving pictures are a greater educative force than 
the periodicals. 

The affirmative was argued by Miss Matilda Hancock, '15, and Miss 
Eliza Davis, '16, of the Alpha Rho Society, and the negative was upheld 
by Miss Eleanor Relyea, '17, and Miss Frances Strong, '15. 

The judges were Mr. Graham Andrews, Mr. J. B. Cheshire, Jr., Mr. 
Pratt of A and M. College, who decided in favor of the negative. 

The last debate was held on March 27, between the Alpha Rho and 
E. A. P. societies. Miss Courtney Crowther, president of the Sigma 
Lambda Society presided. The Alpha Rho Society, represented by Miss 
Robena Carter, '18, and Miss Katherine Bourne, '16, upheld the affirma- 
tive side of the question : 

Resolved. That the girl of today is superior to her grandmother, the 
girl of yesterday. 

The E. A. P. Society, represented by Miss Alice Latham, '16, and 
Miss Elsie Alexander, '16, upheld the negative. 



The St. Mary's Muse. 109 



The judges on this occasion were Dr. Summey of A. and M. College, 
Mr* Boomhour of Meredith College, and Dr. Shore, and their decision 
was in favor of the negative. 

This gave the championship of 1915 to the Epsilon Alpha Pi Liter- 
ary Society. 

Gymnasium Exhibition 

On Friday afternoon, March 26th, Miss Barton gave the annual 
exhibition of the physical culture classes in the gymnasium. 

There was a large crowd of spectators, who testified their approval by 
enthusiastic clapping. The little children, dressed in white middy 
blouses and white shoes and stockings, performed several cunning little 
dances, and had a medicine ball race. The older girls, dressed in white 
middy blouses, black bloomers and black shoes and stockings, marched, 
drilled, danced and did apparatus work. The special class in corrective 
gymnastics worked on ' the stall bars. The exhibition closed with an 
obstacle race in which each class was represented by eight girls. It 
was a very close and exciting race, and finished up the thing with a vim. 
All the events went off in regular order without a flaw, and the interest 
in them never lagged. It was by far the best affair of the kind ever 
held up here, and Miss Barton should certainly be complimented on her 
skillful management. 

ORDER OF EXERCISES. 

1. Free Arm Drill. 

2. Indian Club Drill. 

3. Folk Dances (Sub-Preparatory Class)' — 

(a) Little Polka; (b) Mountain March. 

4. Marching Tactics. 

5. Apparatus — 
First Year: Boom, Balance Boards, Stall Bars. 
Second Year: Buck, Box, Saddles. 

6. Wand Drill. 

7. Progressive Ball Passing Race (Sub-Preparatory). 

8. Folk Dances — 
(a) Swedish Schottische; (b) Vineyard Dance; (c) Irish Lilt. 

9. Obstacle Exchange Race — 
Each class represented by eight girls. 






The St. Mary's Muse. 

Subscription Price One Dollar. 

Single Copies - Fifteen Cents. 

A Magazine published monthly except in July and August at St. Mary's School, Raleigh, N. C, 
in the interest of the students and Alumnse, under the editorial management of the Muse Club. 
Address all communications and send all subscriptions to 

THE ST. MARY'S MUSE, 
Correspondence from friends solicited. Raleigh, N. C. 

EDITORIAL STAFF 1914-1915. 

Margaret Huntington Bottum, Editor-in-Chief. 
Senior Reporters 
Helene Carlton Northcott Sadie Walton Vinson 

Matilda Jordan Hancock Courtney Deforest Crowther 

Junior Reporters 
Eliza Dickinson Davis Mary Auning Floyd Annie Sutton Cameron 

Pencie Creecy Warren, '15, Business Manager 
Fannie Marie Stallings, '16, Assistant Business Manager 



EDITORIAL 






Easter Morning at St. Mary's 

"The day of Resurrection 
Earth tell it out abroad." 

Clear and triumphant the glad young voices raise the exultant song 
and once again the little chapel rings with the joyous triumph of Easter- 
tide. In the hushed stillness at the altar rail many a young heart is 
lifted up with a new joy and gladness and is filled with a truer and 
a deeper reverence. Thus is Easter Day heralded in for us with the early 
morning service. 

Later in the morning more flowers are placed in the chancel and at 
the eleven o'clock service flowers are everywhere ; emblems of the Resur- 
rection, pure Easter lilies, bright daffodils and tulips and through the 
eastern windows the glorious spring sunshine streams in upon glad 
hearts and happy faces. R. H. H. 



Miss Katie 

Her many friends are delighted to know that Miss Katie's condition 
has so improved that she is now back at St. Mary's and with the aid of 
her crutches is able to walk a good deal. Her absence from St. Mary's 
has been very long, extending over several months. We are very glad 



The St. Mary's Muse. Ill 



to have tier with us again and feel encouraged since she can now meet a 
few of her classes in her room. 



Miss Lee 



We are very glad to have Miss Lee with us again after recovering 
from a slight case of typhoid fever. She meets her classes now as usual 
and is gaining strength rapidly. 



OUR EXCHANGES 



The March numbers of our exchanges have on the whole been very- 
good. We only regret that we have not received more of them but take 
pleasure in acknowledging the following : 

The Wahisco, University of North Carolina Magazine, the Monthly 
Chronicle, the Trinity Archive, The Wake Forest Student, Western 
Maryland College Monthly, the Quill, the Watch, High School Gazette, 
Maroon and Gray, the Messenger the Acorn, the Red and White, Stetson 
Weekly Collegiate, Florida Flambeau, the Tattler, the Wofford College 
Journal, the Oracle. 

On account of the absence of our Exchange Editor, Miss Helene 
Eorthcott, who has been at home some little time on account of illness, 
we will have to omit the usual notes on the Exchanges. 



The Class of 1915 

The Senior Class of 1915 is the largest class which has ever been on 
roll to graduate at St. Mary's. We take great pride in printing the list 
of twenty-six members who are looking forward to graduation. 

OFFICERS. 

Helen Peoples President 

Margaret Bottum Vice President 

Sadie Vinson Secretary-Treasurer 

Elizabeth Lay Prophet 

Courtney Crowther Poet 

Frances Strong Historian 



112 The St. Maby's Muse. 



Mattie Moye Adams Durham, N. C. 

Agnes Hyde Barton Hartford, Conn. 

Margaret Huntington Bottum Penland, N. C. 

Elizabeth Carrison Camden, S. C. 

Florence Clarke Middletown, N. C. 

Carol Gresham Collier Goldsboro, N. C. 

Courtney DeForest Crowther Savannah, Ga. 

Margaret Edwards Raleigh, N. C. 

Dorothy Fairley Rockingham, N. C. 

DeLana Stanton Hales Wilson, N. C. 

Matilda Jordan Hancock New Bern, N. C. 

Maude Hotchkiss Raleigh, N. C. 

Gladys Jones-Williams Monte Vallo, Ala. 

Anna Belle King Louisburg, N. C. 

Elizabeth Atkinson Lay Raleigh, N. C. 

Edith Matilda Mann Raleigh, N. C. 

Edna Mann Raleigh, N. C. 

Margaret Mann Raleigh, N. C. 

Emma Louise Merritt Raleigh, N. C. 

Helene Carlton Northcott Winton, N. C. 

Helen Read Peoples Townesville, N. C. 

Florence Douglas Stone Raleigh, N. C. 

Frances Lambert Strong Raleigh, N. C. 

Allene Thornburgh Raleigh, N. C. 

Sadie Walton Vinson Littleton, N. C. 

Pencie Creecy Warren Edenton, N. C. 

Gladys Eccles Yates Raleigh, N. C. 



The 1915 Statistics 

The taking of the "Statistics" for the Annual Muse is always an 
event of excitement and interest and much enthusiasm was shown this 
year. 

The girls gathered in the school room on Monday morning and as a 
surprise were each provided with the "Australian Ballot" containing the 
list of subjects hut no nominations and each girl filled out the ballot 
according to her individual preference. The Muse Committee of 
Seniors then counted the ballots. In the afternoon the girls re-assembled 
to be presented with the "Second Ballots," containing the names of the 
three girls who stood highest in each subject on the First Ballot. The 
Second Ballots were then counted and the names of those chosen by 
receiving the highest votes were posted. 



The St. Maey's Muse. 113 



The 1915 selections are: 

Best Looking Adelyn Barbee 

Most Fascinating Lanie Hales 

Quaintest Violet Bray 

Cutest Annabelle Converse 

Most Ambitious Annie Cameron 

Most Lovable Dorothy Parker 

Greatest Chatterbox Agnes C. Timberlake 

Most Athletic Anne Brinley 

Prettiest Katherine Drane 

Most Attractive Lanie Hales 

Most Influential Margaret H. Bottum 

Best Student Annie Cameron 

Most Courteous Agnes Barton 

Most Popular Arabelle Thomas 

Biggest Bluffer Elizabeth Carrison 

Most Enthusiastic Eliza Davis 

Merriest Katherine McDonald 

Most Unselfish Arabelle Thomas 

Two Best Dancers Laura Beatty, Delia Brown 

Best-All-Around Arabelle Thomas 



Commencerocnt Marshals, 1915 

The Commencement Marshals, who usher at all the school events from 
Easter to Commencement, are elected in the literary societies and 
usually chosen from among the members of the junior class or older girls. 
The election of the Chief Marshal fell to the Sigma Lambda Literary 
Society this year who chose Miss Kate Lois Montgomery. 

The Marshals elected are as follows: 

Sigma Lambda — Kate Lois Montgomery, Chief; Adelyn Barbee and 
Eleanor Relyea; Epsilon Alpha Pi — Elsie Alexander and Helen Wright; 
Alpha Bho — Mary Floyd and Dorothy Parker. 



114 The St. Maby's Muse. 



From Palm Sunday to Commencement 

April-May. 
March 28, Palm Sunday. 

11 a. m., Palm Sunday Service. Holy Baptism. 
5 p. m., Annual Visit of the Bishop. Confirmation. 
April 4, Easter Day. 

8:30 a. m., Early Communion. Choral Service. 

11:00 a. m, Easter Service and Sermon. Lenten Offering. 
April 5, Monday. Easter Egg Hunt, 7 p. m. 
April 10, Saturday. 

April 13, Tuesday. Raleigh Music Festival. The Damrosch Orchestra. 
April 17, Saturday. Junior-Senior Party. 
April 24, Saturday. 
May 1, Saturday. 

May 3, Monday. Certificate Recital. Mary Auning Floyd. Piano, 8:15 p. m. 
May 8, Saturday. School Party, 8 p. m. 
May 6, Thursday. Children's Recital. 

May 10, Monday. Certificate Recital. Hattie May Lasater. Piano 8:15 p. m. 
May 12, Wednesday. Alumnae Day, Seventy-third Anniversary. 
May 13, Thursday. Ascension Day. 

May 15, Saturday. Annual Recital of the Chorus, 8:15 p. m. 
May 17, Monday. Adelyn Barhee, Piano Recital 8:15. 
May 18, 19, Tuesday, Wednesday. Senior Examinations. 
May 20 to 22. Final Examinations. 
May 25 to 27. Commencement Exercises. 



Read! Mark! Act! 



The Editors wish to call the especial attention of the St. Mary's girls and the 
"eaders of The Muse generally to the advertisements inserted here. It is a good 
jrinciple to patronize those that help you. Let the advertisers see that it pays 
;hem to advertise in The Muse, and make those who do not advertise realize that 
t is their loss, not ours. 



ESTABLISHED 1858 



H. MAHLER'S SONS 

JEWELERS 

IALEIGH, NORTH CAROLINA 




Exclusive 
Millinery 



RALEIGH m.C 



A little iron — a cunning curl, 

A box of powder — a pretty girl, 

A little rain, away she goes, 

A homely girl with a freckled nose. — Ex. 



[he Dobbin-Ferrall Go. 

THE STORE OF QUALITY 

DRY GOODS OF ALL KINDS 
MILLINERY 

lilored Suits and Coats, Carpets, Cur- 
tains, Draperies, etc. 

^DIES' FINE SHOES & SLIPPERS 



'It's worth the difference" 



The Tyree Studio 



'Workers in Artistic Photography' 



Advertisements 



Raleigh's Exclusive Store for Ladies' 

and Misses Ready-to-Wear Garments 

Ten per cent off to College Girls 

Fayetteville 
Street 



W$t Jfasijion 



KAPLAN BROS. CO. 



Royall & Borden Furniture Go. 

We 

Handle 

Mantles 



127 Fayetteville St. 



RALEIGH, N. C. 



THOMAS A PARTIN COMPANY 

Raleigh, N. 0. 

Specialty of Ladies' Ready-to-Wear Gar 
ments and Gossard's Lace Front Corset 

JOHNSON & JOHNSON CO. 

Coal, Wood, Ice, Brick 

122 Fayetteville Street Raleigh, N. 

THE ALDERMAN CHINA C0MPAN1 

Candy, China, Toys 
Pictures, Stationery 



CHOICE CUT FLOWERS 

AT J. L. O'QUINN & COMPANY'S 

Leading Florists or North Carolina. 

Raleigh, N. C. 



The Senior's time is nearly run, 
Next time we'll put on airs, 
And departing leave behind us, 
Footprints just as big as theirs. — Ex. 



Why Is 

Brantley's Fountain 

the 

MOST POPULAR? 

Ask the Girls 



BOYLAN-PEARGE 

COMPANY 

The Greatest Store 
in the City for the 

SCHOOL GIRLS 



\ 



Advertisements 



Stationery — College Linen 
Cameras and Supplies 
Waterman's Ideal Fountain Pens 

JAMES E.THIEM 

The Office Stationery Co. 

Bell Phone 135 RALEIGH, N. C. 

THE SOUTHERN EDUCATIONAL BUREAU 

RALEIGH, N. 0. 

Twenty-three years successful experience se- 
suring desirable teachers for schools and col- 
leges and placing competent teachers in satis- 
factory positions. 

CONSERVATIVE AND CONFIDENTIAL. 



C. E. HARTGE 

ARCHITECT 



CAROLINA POWER & LIGHT COMPANY 

Electric Light and 
Power 

174— BOTH PHONES— 226 



King's Grocery 

'THE LITTLE STORE" 



H. STEINMETZ— FLORIST 

Roses, Carnations, Violets, Wedding Bouquets, 

Floral Designs, Palms, Ferns, all kinds of plants. 

Raleigh, N. C. Phone 113 



Music Teacher (patiently) : "Why don't you pause there? Don't you see 
that it is marked rest?" 

Pupil: "Yes ma'am, but I aint tired." — Ex. 



Jolly & Wynne Jewelry Co. 



COLLEGE 
JEWELRY 



L28 Payetteville St. 



Raleigh, N. C. 



HELLER'S SHOE STORE 
SHOES AND HOSIERY 



WALK-OVER— The Shoe for You 
Walk-Over Shoe Shop 

RALEIGH, N. C. 



HERBERT ROSENTHAL 

Ladies' Pine Shoes 

JOHNSON & McCULLERS COMPANY 
Good Things to Eat 

122 FAYETTEVILLE STREET 



Advertisements 


S. GLASS The Ladies' Store 

Everything up-to-date for Ladies, Misses 

and Children. Ready-made wearing apparel 

210 Fayetteville St. Raleigh, N. 0. 


KING-CROWELL'S DRUG STORE | 
AND SODA FOUNTAIN 

Cor. Fayetteville and Hargett Sts. 


SHOES! WHOSE? 
BERNARD L. CROCKER 

124 Fayetteville Street 


Insure Against Loss by Fire 

Best Companies Represented. Bonding Solicited 

The Mechanics Sayings Bank 

RALEIGH, N. C. 


ATLANTIC FIRE INSURANCE CO.! 

RALEIGH, N. C. 

Home Company Home Capital 
Safe, Secure, and Successful 

CHAS. E. JOHNSON, President 

A. A. THOMPSON, Treasurer 

R. S. BUSBEE, Secretarj 


YOUNG & HUGHES 
Plumbers 


Steam Fitters 

Hot Water Heating 

S. Wilmington Street 


HUNTER-RAND COMPANY 

Dry Goods, Notions, Suits, Milliner/ 
and Shoes 

208 Fayetteville St. RALEIGH, N. C 



Teacher: "There are two ways of working this problem, John, which do 
you choose." 
John (waking up suddenly) : "I — er — I chews Spearmint." 



M. Rosenthal 


MARRIAGE INVITATIONS AND 
VISITING CARDS 


& Co. 


CORRECTLY and PROMPTLY EN6RAVED 

Send for samples and prices 


GROCERS 


Edwards & Brought on Printing 
Company 


WILMINGTON and HARGETT STS. 


Steel Die and Copper Plate Engraver 




RALEIGH, N. C. 



Advertisements 



HIGH GRADE TOILET ARTICLES 
THE WAKE DRUG STORE 

Phones 228 


WHITE ICE CREAM CO. 

BEST 


T. F. BROCKWELL 

All Kinds of Keys. Bicycle Supplies. 

Typewriters of all Kinds Repaired. 


ICE CREAM 
Phone 123 


DARNELL & THOMAS 


CORNER SALISBURY AND HARCETT STS. 


ONE-PRICE MUSIC HOUSE 




PESCUD'S BOOK STORE 

12 W. Hargett St. 


T. W. BLAKE, Raleigh, N. c. 

RICH JEWELRY MAIL ORDERS SOLICITED 






RALEIGH FLORAL CO. 

CHOICE CUT FLOWERS 


REGINALD HAMLET DRUG STORE 

Saunders Street 


Raleigh French Dry Cleaning Company 

Corner Blount and Morgan Streets. 


HICKS' UPTOWN DRUG STORE 


HOTEL GIERSCH 

RALEIGH, N. C. 


Phone 107 
PROMPT DELIVERY 



Realize and patronize the advertized! — (Ad.) 



Norfolk Southern Railroad 

ROUTE OF THE "NIGHT EXPRESS" 



New Short Line Through Eastern North Carolina 



DIRECT LINE BETWEEN 



NORFOLK 



RALEIGH 

NEW BERN 

GOLDSBORO 



Via WASHINGTON, KINSTON, GREENVILLE, FARMVlLLE 
AND WILSON, TO POINTS NORTH AND SOUTH 

1 

' Electric Lighted Pullman Sleeping and Parlor Cars 



Fast Schedule, Best Service 

H. S. LEARD, G. P. A. 
Norfolk, Va. 



Double Daily Express Service 

J. F. MITCHELL, T, P. A, 

Raleigh. N. C. 



Advertisements 



TAYLOR FURNISHING COMPANY 

206-210 Masonic Temple 

Suits, Dresses, Coats, Etc. 

Tailoring and Dressmaking 

SPECIAL PKICES 


"Where Your Dollars Count Most" 

RALEIGH DEPARTMENT 
STORE 

126 Fayetteville St. Raleigh, N. C. 


Thos. H. Briggs & Sons, Raleigh, N. C. 

Hardware, Paints, House Furnishings 

and Stoves. We endeavor to give a 

faithful service and value. 


ELLINGTON'S ART STORE 

RALEIGH, N. C. 
Everything in Art. 
Embroidery Materials, Wools and Zephyrs. 




MISSES REESE & COMPANY 
MILLINERY 


SOUVENIRS OF ST. MARY'S 
The Toyland Co. 




WATSON PICTURE AND ART CO. [ 

Picture Frames and Window Shades. ; 


Harness and Saddle Horses. Heavy Hauling 

CARVER'S STABLES 

Henry S. Carver, Prop. Both Phones 229 

BOARD, LIVERY AND EXCHANGE 
118 E. Davie St. RALEIGH, N. C. 


ROYSTER'S CANDY A SPECIALTY^ 

Made Fresh Every Day 


GRIMES & VASS Raleigh, N. C. 
Fire Insurance and Investments 


Call OLIVE'S BAGGAGE TRANSFER 

Phone 529 



Teacher : 
in it." — Ex. 



"Let us now sing 'Little Drops of Water,' and put some spirit 



C. D. ARTHUR City Market 

FISH AND OYSTERS 

MOORE'S ELECTRIC SHOE SHOP 

104 E. HARGETT ST. 

JOHN C. DREWRY 
"MUTUAL LIFE INSURANCE" 

Ladies'and Gentlemen's Dry Cleanino Establishment 

Caedwell & O'Kelly, Proprietors 
204 S. Salisbury St. 

HAYES & HALL— STUDIO 



California Fruit Store, 111 Fayetteville St., Raleigh 

Fancy fruits and pure ice cream. Best equipped and most 
sanitary ice cream factory in the state. Our cream is the 
"Quality Kind." Send us your orders. California Fruit 
Store, 111 Fayetteville St.. Vurnakes & Co., Props., Raleigh. 



L. SCHWARTZ 
RICHMOND MARKET 

Meats of All Kinds 
Raleigh, N. C. 



Calumet Tea and Coffee Company 

51 and 53 Franklin St. Chicago, HI 

Proprietors of Calumet Coffee and Spice Mills 

PERRY'S ART STORE 

S. Wilmington St. 



J. R. FERRALL & CO. 
GROCERS 



Advertisements 



THE YARBOROUGH 



Raleigh's Leading Hotel 
Its Cafe one of the Best in the Country B. H. Griffin Hotel Co., Proprietors 



A MODERN NOVEL. 

Chapter I. 

Maid one. 

Chapter II. 

Man too. 

Chapter III. 
Maid won. 

Chapter IV. 
Lovers two. 

Chapter V. 

Made one. 






SOUTHERN RAILWAY 

Premier Carrier of the South 



Most Direct Line to all Points North, South, 
East, West 



Through sleeping cars to all principal cities, through Tourist Cars 
to San Francisco and other California points. All-year tourist tick- 
ets on sale to principal Western points. Convenient local, as well 
as through trains. Electrically lighted coaches. Complete Dining 
Car Service on all through trains. Ask representatives of Southern 
Railway about special rates account Christmas holidays; also 
about various other special occasions. If you are contemplating a 
trip to any point, communicate with representatives of Southern 
Railway before completing your arrangements for same. They will 
gladly and courteously furnish you with all information as to the 
cheapest and most comfortable way in which to make the trip. Will 
also be glad to secure Pullman Sleeping Car reservations for you. 
H. P. CARY, General Pass. Agent, J. O. JONES, Traveling Pass. Agent, 

Washington, D. C. Raleigh, N. C. 



Location Central for the Carolinas. 

Climate Healthy and Salubrious. 

St. Mary's School 

RALEIGH, N. C. 

(for girls and young women) 

74th ANNUAL SESSION BEGINS SEPTEMBER 15, 1915. 



SESSION DIVIDED INTO TWO TERMS. 

EASTER TERM BEGAN FEBRUARY 19, 1915. 



/ 1. THE COLLEGE. 
St. Mary's \ 2. THE MUSIC SCHOOL, 

s instruction in these J g. THE BUSINESS SCHOOL. 
] k. THE ART SCHOOL. 
5. THE PREPARATORY SCHOOL 



In 1914-15 are enrolled 275 students from 16 Dioceses. 

Twenty-eight Members of the Faculty, 



Well Furnished, Progressive Music Department. Much Equipment New. 
Thirty-six Pianos. New Gymnasium, Dining Hall and 
Dormitories. 
Special attention to the Social and Christian side of Education ivithout 
slight to the Scholastic training. 

For Catalogue and other information address 

Rev. George W. Lay, 
Rector. 



3D fie 

t 0lattf& jWuse 



ifflap, 1915 




3Centt) Slrmtoertfarp Jlumtier 



&aletgf), M. C. 



The St. Mary's Muse. 

TENTH ANNIVERSARY NUMBER 
Vol. XIX. May, 1915. No. 10 



Ten Years of the "Little Muse" 



We are prone in the passing of the years and the rapid succession of 

■ school "generations" to forget the past and our predecessors. With the 

session of 1913-14 the "monthly Muse" completed the tenth year since its 

revival. The present volume of the Muse bears the number "19" but 

volume 1, dates back to the first issue of the publication in 1879, and the 

] present series began with volume 9 in 1904-05. 

It is to remind those who have worked for the Muse in those ten years 
i that they are not forgotten and to show some mark of appreciation of their 
! having done what they could that this anniversary number is issued. The 
form we have chosen to have it take is a reprint of some of the character- 
istic contributions to the "literary part" of the Muse in those ten years, 
suggesting to the St. Mary's girls of today, as it must to those who read, 
how closely the interests of each year are akin. The girls who wrote 
the articles were in their day as prominent at St. Mary's as the student 
leaders of the present. They have other interests now and some of them 
are known by other names than in their St. Mary's days but we may be 
confident that their interest in St. Mary's is constant. 

We record in this number the names of the chief officers of the monthly 
Muse during these ten years — -the Editors in Chief and Business Managers, 
and in a brief summary of the period of the ten volumes we call again the 
names of some of those others who have played a prominent part in the 
publication. But only a part of the names can be mentioned and these 
called by name are to be taken as typical of the others unmentioned. 

The Muse has not developed as we hoped it would, but it has preserved a 
faithful record of the passing story of St. Mary's. This was its main 
purpose. We will hope that in the ten years ahead it may continue a 



116 The St. Mary's Muse. 



faithful chronicler and gain prestige in those other two respects in which 
it should be so valuable to the School — as a medium for student literary 
efforts and as a force in increasing alumnas activity. E. C. 

The Chief Officers of the Monthly Muse, I904-'I4 

Editors-in-Chief Business Managers 

1904-05 (Volume 9) Anna Barrow Clark, '05 Mary Ellis Rossell, '05. 

1905-06 (Volume 10) Ruth Foster, '06 Jane Iredell Green, '06. 

1906-07 (Volume 11) Serena Cobia Bailey Jessie Page Harris. 

Beatrice Bollman Cohen, '07. 

1907-08 (Volume 12) Georgia Stanton Hales, '08. . . . Katherine Henderson. 

1908-09 (Volume 13) Mary Campbell Shuford, '10. . . Ida Jean Rogerson, '10. 

1909-10 (Volume 14) Mary Owen Green Jane Porcher DuBose. 

1910-11 (Volume 15) Nell Battle Lewis, '11 Elizabeth Woodard Leary. 

1911-12 (Volume 16) Patsy Harry Smith, '12 Amelia Pinkney Sturgeon. 

1912-13 (Volume 17) Caroline Clarke Jones, '13 Jennie Elizabeth Woodruff, '13. 

1913-14 (Volume 18) Laura Margaret Hoppe, '14. . . . Sallie Kirk Heyward, '14. 



Some Fragments of Muse History 



Few at St. Mary's now remember that the Muse first came into being 
in 1879, when it was first published by Mr. W. H. Sanborn, at that time 
Dr. Bennett Smedes' Director of Music. The publication was intended 
primarily for the development of the Music Department and was hence 
very appropriately named The St. Mary's Muse. It was a little eight page 
pamphlet with pages about the size of the present Muse and was issued 
quarterly "in the interest of art, literature, education, and of St. Mary's 
School." Containing brief notes and comments on various topics of cur- 
rent interest in the world of music and literature, with a few items about 
St. Mary's, it was rather a little newspaper in St. Mary's than a little 
St. Mary's newspaper. 

After its establishment the paper was turned over to the supervision of 
Mrs. Meares, then Lady Principal and was edited under her direction by 
"Euterpe and the Pierian Club." Thus appeared the first five volumes, 
1879-1883. 

Thirteen years later, under Miss McVea, then Lady Principal, volume 
six was issued in 1896. Volume 7 followed in 1899, and volume 8 in 1900. 
The magazine had been growing in thickness and decreasing in number of 
issues, and volume 8 was a single book of a hundred pages, practically a 
year-book. 

The publication of this volume and the increasing number of year-books 



The St. Mary's Muse. 117 



turned St. Mary's girls in that direction, and next year, 1901, saw the be- 
ginning of the custom of the publication of a student year-book, which still 
continues. To distinguish it from the periodical and yet show its connec- 
tion with it, the year-book was called The Muse. 

The Senior Class took charge of the Year Book and issued it successfully 
from 1901 to 1904, and no attempt was made at a news publication. 

It was in the fall of 1904 that it was decided wise in the interest of the 
School to begin a monthly news magazine for the students and alumnse, 
with such literary contributions as might be available, and as only by the 
closest cooperation of all interested forces was it possible to publish both 
annual and monthly in a school the size of St. Mary's, the Senior Class 
undertook both publications under the direction of Mr. Cruikshank. In 
1906 the responsibility for the monthly passed to a student "Muse Club," 
organized for the purpose, and it is still issued by the Muse Club. 

Anna Barrow Clark (Mrs. "W. J. Gordon) was the first editor of the 
reestablished magazine, and her Muses tell of the Enlarged Chapel and 
the Clement Scholarship, and see the first publication of "Alma Mater." 
Miss Dowd and Miss Checkley aided much with their pens and Margaret 
JJuBose (Mrs. Isaac T. Avery) and Sadie Jenkins (Mrs. Battle) did 
most of the story and verse writing. 

1906, "Ruth Foster's" year welcomed the Pittman Bequest, leading to 
the building of the Auditorium, and saw the "Muse Prizes" established and 
awarded for the first time to "Serena Bailey," Helen Liddell (Mrs. D. B. 
McBride), and Helen Strange (Mrs. Burke Bridgers). Mile. Masch and 
■"Irving Morgan" (Mrs. E. H. Palmer) enlivened the Muse pages with 
verse on "timely topics," while Miss Bailey's stories, Miss Liddell's verses, 
Miss Strange's humorous sketches, and the contributions of "Louise Hill" 
and "Alice Winston Spruill" (Mrs. T. W. Alexander) were a feature. 

"Serena Bailey" was the dominating figure the next year, 1907, when she 
was Editor. "Helen Liddell's" work was again conspicuous, so much so 
that she alone was awarded the Muse Prize, while "Sue Prince" and 
"Helen Strange" still pleased, and Miss Spann and "Ruth Wewbold" (Mrs. 
J. M. Yail) were frequent and valued contributors of verse. This year 
was marked by the resignation of Mr. DuBose as rector. 

1908 was "Georgia Hales' " year, and "Mary Shuford" and "Ida Roger- 
son" won themselves fame by their writings. The Muse Prizes went to 



118 The St. Mary's Muse. 

thein and to "Sara Prince ('Sadie') Thomas." Other prominent contribu- 
tors were "the Hazards (Minnie and Paula) and "Nell Wilson" (Mrs. 
W. G. McAdoo). This was the year marked by the inauguration of the 
rectorship of Mr. Lay and the presence of Mrs. Sheib as Lady Principal. 

"Mary Shuford" and "Ida Rogerson" "ran" the Muse in 1909, a year of 
importance to St. Mary's for it was marked by the addition of the new 
buildings, "the "Wings" and "Clement Hall." "Virginia Picker" and 
"Irma Deaton" did much with their poetry and stories, and "Frances 
Bottum" began the drawings which have been a feature of the Annual 
each year since. These three received the Muse prizes. 

1910 was the year of the Smedes Centennial Celebration and the gradua- 
tion of the largest St. Mary's class to that time, seventeen in number, in- 
cluding Misses Shuford, Pogerson, Pickel, Deaton, and the Hazards. 
"Elizabeth Hughes" was the important new factor in Muse work and she 
and "Nell Lewis" were awarded the Muse prizes. 

1911 was "Nell Lewis" year and her writings made the Muse, but she 
had valuable assistance in "Margaret Broadfoot," "Patsey Smith," and 
"Bebecca Wood." Mr. DuBose's death occurred during this year. 

1912 brings us well within the present student generation and present 
memories, and we recall how well the Muse was handled by "Patsey 
Smith" and the help given her by "Mary Owen," "Mary Butler," "Mar- 
garet Broadfoot" and "Frances Bottum." 

In 1913 with "Caroline Jones" at the helm, "Ellen Johnson" and "Annie 
Cameron" began their contributions. 

Of 1914 it is unnecessary to speak. 

Here we have mentioned in brief those who have done most to win 
favor for any "literary portion" of the Muse, and it is easiest to mention 
them without important omission; but it must be borne in mind that the 
Muse is primarily not "literary" but "news." Without the Business 
Managers and their assistants to look after the finances and the news 
editors and their staffs to write up the St. Mary's news, the monthly 
Muse would not have lived long. To each of them and to all the others 
who in so many ways have contributed to the success of these ten years of 
the Muse as advertisers, subscribers, and workers, let this Muse be a small 
token of appreciation of the Muse workers of today. 



The St. Mary's Muse. 119 



Easter Lilies 



Ah! welcome, lilies white, to us you bring 
The sweetest message that has e'er been told, 

For of the greatest hope of man you sing, 
The greatest joy of earth you now unfold. 

You tell of One more pure than your pure selves, 
Your message is more fragrant than your breath, 

For light of heaven within the world now dwells 
In His who overcomes the darkest death. 

And we who hear your song, oh! lilies fair, 
Are filled with rapture, for we hear you say: 

The grave is vanquished, death has lost its snare, 
For Christ is risen again this Easter day. 

—Helen Katharine Liddell. 1907. 



The Tail of an Easter Chicken 



As Father Booster always said, ma was a speeihen of the higher 
education of women, and that came near being the death of this 
poor chick. When she was quite young she went to a grand Univer- 
sity called Incubator, and she has spent the rest of her life forcing us 
to live up to the many ideas she caught there (and to judge from their 
number, she must have spent all her time catching them). Our first 
day of life (there were only thirteen of us) was made miserable be- 
cause she said at her "dear old Alma 'Bator, chickens were fed on the 
most hygienic-nutritious-albuminous food stuff, mixed in a tin plat- 
ter," and we should begin life properly. After scratching in the sand 
for a "tin platter," father admitted that he had never seen nor heard 
of one, and didn't believe such things grew in our part of the country, 
so he brought up some delicious fat earth-worms, which "filled the 
bill" in every way. 

Soon after that, ma said she believed in woman's rights and why 
shouldn't hens crow as well as roosters anyway ? She tried it once 
right out in the public Barnyard Square, and old Uncle Rastus threw 
a rock at her and swore he wouldn't have "no hens atryin' to ac' lak 



120 The St. Mart's Muse. 



roosters 'roun him, no sah-ree-bob !" That awful threat quieted her 
until the next day, when she decided that it was time for us to begin 
to study botany and Garden Classics. We were all studiously exam- 
ining the roots of the new planted green-peas when Uncle Rastus 
came in sight. "Har she be, sah: de most perniciest and high-falutinest 
hen, what ever I seed ! You kin hab her, sah, fo' yo' Easter doins, 
and de unlucky thirteen chicks fo' mos' nothin'." There followed an 
awful time, the bare mention of which causes tears to stream from my 
eyes. Not to dwell on the harrowing story, we were all dumped into 
a wagon and taken to the front of a store. The window we were in 
was covered with horribly clean sand, and though you could see into 
the street there was an awful thing that bumped your head when you 
tried to get out that way. Soon a horrible man came in with a big 
basin. He grabbed me and was just about to plunge me in, when I 
gave a desperate squeak, kick and a wriggle combined, reached the 
floor and escaped by the opening at which he came in. Free at last ! 
But thoughts of ma and the others led me back in front of that fatal 
window, and what do you think I saw there ! 

In place of the twelve fluffy little yellow brothers and sisters I had 
left behind me, were as many brilliant, green, blue and red balls, with 
beady eyes, — and "Diamond," the baby of the family, was blue on 
one side and red on the other. Mother must have thought she was 
back at her beloved Incubator, for she was giving the chicks our old 
familiar lesson of walking gently, by putting the toes down first, and 
counting ten between each step. All of a sudden my eyes caught 
this horrible sign, and the meaning flashed over me, "Diamond Dyes" ! 
What ! "Diamond," our pet ! the brightest of us all, to die ! And be- 
fore she was a week old: My only hope lay in finding father Rooster, 
so I ran like mad down the street. I had an awful fright once when 
I came to an open field where some boys were playing ball, and one 
called out, "Foul" ! Now I knew he meant me, (for mother used to 
call father a "fowl" when she was very mad at him) ; but I ran all the 
faster. At last I found a nest right up on a porch, but it looked so 
home-like that I just had to crawl into it. Then for the first time I 
chanced to smooth my beloved tail, and, to my horror, I found it was 



The St. Mary's Muse. 121 



a bright red ! Just like "Diamond" ! Perhaps Diamond will die 
from that awful bright color, and then I would too. So thinking, I 
sobbed myself to sleep. 

I thought I had died and entered the chickens' paradise, when the 
next morning the softest little hand touched me and the sweetest little 
voice said, a O ! Muwer, Santa Claus has brought me a truly live Easter 
chicken, with a very Easter tail. Can't I keep it always?" 

Margaret Rosalie Dttbose. 1907. 



An Easter Story 



It was a bright, sunshiny Easter morning. The turnip patch next 
to Mr. McGregor's front yard glistened softly with dew, as two little 
rabbits went carefully hopping their way among the green plants. It 
was, of course, Peter Rabbitt and his college chum, Benjamin Bunny. 
Like all college boys they were up to pranks, and this time it was to 
venture beyond the college limits of the turnip patch fence and go 
exploring in Mr. McGregor's front yard. Being Freshmen, they were 
not allowed to smoke even the mildest form of rabbit tobacco, and they 
had determined to cut college, and go into the forbidden land where 
the precious weed grew in abundance. This bold and daring deed they 
were now trying to accomplish. 

Peter Rabbit, the older and braver, hopped nimbly along ahead, wav- 
ing his little white Freshman flag boldly in the air, as if he were on his 
way to root at a football game. Benjamin Bunny followed sturdily. 
Soon they reached the crack in the fence, and in they went with a 
final flourish of each white flag. 

Once inside, great was their consternation at the sight that met their 
eyes. For a moment little Benjie's heart stood still; but when he saw 
the sturdy bearing of Peter, he plucked up courage and stood valiantly 
beside his friend. For there among the flowers of Mr. McGregor's 
front yard on all sides, of all colors, of all sizes, were — rabbits. What 
did it all mean ? Where did these fellows come from ? What college 
did they belong to? Where were the sweaters and caps every college 



122 The St. Mary's Muse. 



man wore ? But they gave no answer to these vain questionings and 
sat still unblinking. 

As Peter and Benjie stood thus conversing under a great geranium 
leaf, down the walk there came running a little girl, followed by no 
other than the terrible Mr. McGregor. She was clapping her hands 
and crying out, "Oh, I'm going to find the Easter rabbits." Sure 
enough she made straight for the flower-bed where stood those im- 
movable creatures. Why they did not form themselves into a flying 
wedge and make a dash for liberty, Benjie could not understand. She 
came closer and closer to the staring crowd, and finally gave a little 
shriek, stooped over, picked one up — and bit off his head. 

The two boys stayed to see no more. Peter gave the signal to Benjie 
and started for the hole. They scuttled through with a slight damage 
to Peter's flag. Past the turnips, scattering the dew, to right and left, 
they skimmed along. Soon they were within their own college walls 
bending over their first lesson and translating with shaking voice, "0 
temporal O mores !" Helen Wilmeb Stone. 1909. 



Easter Eve 



All was at peace within the cloister walls, 
No footstep echoed through the silent halls; 
The monks lay sleeping, waiting till the dawn 
That should bring in the blessed Easter morn. 

But sleep came not to Brother Anselm's cell, 

Into his soul no holy quiet fell; 

Upon the floor the good man knelt and prayed: 

"O Lord, show me Thy light: — I am afraid! — 

I grope in darkness — O guide Thou my feet! 

And may I better know Thee, and more sweet 

Find Thy communion! Grant to me this night 

Thy peace, that in the Easter morning's light 

Joyfully I may worship with the rest 

Of these, my brethren, whom Thou hast so blest." 

Even as he prayed the dim walls 'gan grow bright 

And all the room was filled with silent light; 

And in the midst of the bare cell stood One 

In shining white, Whose face was like the sun, 

And Anselm could not look upon that Face, 

But bowed him low, and humbly prayed for grace. 



The St. Mary's Muse. 123 



Then spoke the Saviour in a low, sweet voice 
That thrilled, the monk, and made his heart rejoice. 
"Anselm," He said, "thy praise is sweet to Me, 
And when thou prayest upon thy bended knee, 
Thy prayers like incense-perfume rise to Heaven; 
No sweeter praise than thine to Me is given 
Within these walls. But, Anselm, know that thou 
Canst praise me better; listen and learn how. 

Out in the world which thou hast left for Me, 
Lives many a one who longs for such as thee, 
To comfort him and cheer him on life's way. 
And for My sake I bid thee go today 
To those who know not of their risen Lord, 
And tell to them the message thou hast heard. 
Go, and in going thou shalt find that light 
Which thou hast asked of Me in prayer tonight." 

Still meekly bowed, in humble voice and low, 
Anselm replied, "Obedient, Lord, I go." 

Then all was dark, and Anselm went to rest, 
Knowing that in that night he had been blest; 
And waking when the Easter morn rose bright, 
He prayed, "O Lord, I thank Thee for Thy light." 

— Irma Deaton. 1910. 



LooK Up 



Though the dreary rain is falling, 
From the woods there comes the calling 
Of a mocking-bird that's singing 
For the weary world to hear. 

' Ye disconsolate and weary, 
Though the day be dark and dreary, 
In my heart the hope is springing 
That the sky will yet be clear. 

When this gloomy storm is over, 
Then the rain-drops on the clover 
Will be shimmering and shining 
To repay us for the rain. 






124 The St. Mart's Muse. 



Therefore think ye on the morrow 
And forget your present sorrow; 
It is useless to be pining, 
For the sun will shine again!" 

Serena C. Bailey. 1908. 



The Legend of the Crystal Stream 



In a fair, far-off land there flows a crystal stream. It is a sparkling 
laughing stream, and in the day the sunbeams kiss its ripples, and in 
the calm of the soft spring nights the silver stars lie glimmering on its 
breast. Sometimes fair girls come to it and smile back at the reflec- 
tion of their own glad looks, and lovers in the young spring lie on its 
banks and listen to its murmur. Where this stream now flows wag 
once but a pleasant meadow land ; and this is the story of how the 
stream sprang up in a night; this is the legend of the Crystal Stream 
that is told to the wandering youth of the land. 

There dwelt in the Land of Unfulfilled Desire a princess whose eyes 
haunted one with the mystery of unshed tears. All her life she had 
been a very happy princess until one night as she slept an angel from 
the Land of Crowned Endeavor in passing had touched her with the 
tip of his saffron wing, and she had seen a vision, fleeting, beautiful. 
After that ofttimes there arose in her heart strange longing for joys 
that she dared not name. And from that day men called her Ignania, 
or the Princess with the Heart-afire. Before that she had never 
dreamed of the Struggle, but because, by the brush of the angel's wing 
vague longings had been aroused in her heart, she was never again 
content. 

Then the Princess took up the Struggle for the Creation of a Perfect 
Thing, and as she strove, she came to see that in the throngs of men 
around her, there were others whom before she had thought of only 
as idle and pleasure loving, that were striving like herself, others whom 
the angel with the saffron wing had waked. Many things the princess 
attempted, but in none of them could she succeed. Then she decided 
that she would go to the three who, of all that like herself were striving 
seemed to have found the secret of the Creation of the Perfect Thing. 



The St. Mary's Muse. 125 



And so first she went to a famous artist who was painting a flower. 
And all the world said of the painting, "How perfect! It is the 
flower made eternal with colors that cannot fade." The princess 
looked and saw no flaw. Then she turned to the sad-eyed artist and 
said: 

"Tell me the secret of the Creation of the Perfect." 

And the artist sighed and answered : 

"Because you too have striven I will tell you something that no one 
else shall ever know. Once as I painted, on the clear white of the petal, 
I dropped a drop of burning red ; and because my colors do not fade 
there was no way in which it could be erased. But I painted over and 
over it with white, and so now, because it was done cleverly, the world 
sees no defect, but in my heart of hearts I know that the flaw is there. 
Look closely." 

Then the princess looked closely and she could see the faint, faint 
mark, scarcely discernible. 

Then Ignania went to a great good priest whose life was free from 
lust and hate and base deceit and of whom all the world said, "His is a 
perfect life." So she came to him and said: 

"Tell the the secret." 

"Because you are young and eager-eyed, and have great hope, I will 
tell you what I have long kept hidden. The world thinks my life per- 
fect, but that is because the world cannot see within. But there is a 
great stain on my heart that nothing can ever cleanse: the blood of a 
friend." 

So the princess left the priest and went to a mechanic who had in- 
vented a wonderful machine. And all the world said of it, "This is a 
perfect thing." 

So Ignania said to the mechanic : 

"Tell me the secret." 

And he answered: 

"You see the great wheel that revolves there. At every millionth 
revolution there is a catch, and the mechanism is stopped, but only for a 
fraction of a second. And because the world does not discern it, it says, 
'This is a perfect thing.' " 

Then the princess sighed and went back to her father's palace. 



126 The St. Mary's Muse. 

Now because the princess Ignania was young she believed that though 
all others had failed she could create the Perfect Thing, and so she set 
herself to weave a cloak of finest texture that should hold the glimmer 
of the moon-lit sea, and the gray of the dawn, and the gold of the sun- 
kissed daffodil, and the azure of the sky, and the green of the young 
leaves in spring. And this cloak should be a perfect creation. 

The princess worked until the suns of a hundred days had set, and 
at last the cloak was finished. Then she held it up and cried : 

"At last ! I of all the world have created the Perfect Thing. For in 
this cloak there is the glimmer of the moon-lit sea, and the gray of 
the dawn, and the gold of the sun-kissed daffodil, and the azure of the 
sky, and the green of the young leaves in spring." And she was very 
glad. So she said: 

"I will show it to the artist and the priest and the mechanic." 

And she set out. As she hurried through a little strip of wood, she 
felt the cloak catch on a twig by the way, and as she stopped to untangle 
it she pulled it ever so slightly, and lo ! the silken threads began to ravel, 
and in a moment what before had been the wonderful cloak lay at her 
feet, a mass of shimmering, fairy-tinted threads of silk ; for, alas, in 
the weaving the princess had dropped a stitch. 

But she said: 

"I will begin again to-morrow, and this time there shall be no flaw." 

That night she slept deeply, and in the morning she was awakened 
by the soft lapping of waters ; and she went out into the freshness 
of the morning and found a gentle stream flowing through the valley; 
from the depths of the stream a voice said: 

"Ignania, you are the Spirit of Eternal Youth with the Heart-afire. 
This stream springs from the tears that in defeat and disappointment 
you have not shed. Follow it until it widens by the silver birches. 
There is a barge ; and it shall float you through the young morning on 
towards the Land of Crowned Endeavor, and you shall dwell no 
longer in this land where dreams are never realized, and where desires 
remain forever unfulfilled." 

Margaret Strange Broadfoot. 1911. 



The St. Mary's Muse. 127 



The Dandelion 



Once a little dandelion 

In a corner grew; 
Small and weak, but very bright, 

Did the best it knew. 

If anyone passed near its nook, 

The flower looked up and smiled; 
Many a weary, aching heart 

Prom trouble it beguiled. 

A little child came toddling out 

From a house across the way — 
Just a mite of three or four, 
Wishing but to play. 

As she reached the road-way wide, 

A team swung into view; 
Fast it came; it could not swerve; 

Naught there seemed to do. 

Just in time the little child 

Spied the blossom sweet — 
Ran across to gather it, 

Missed the horses' feet. 

Nothing strange that mother fond, 

Picking baby up, 
Prayed a fervent blessing on 

The flower's yellow cup. 

Elizabeth T. Waddill. 1907. 



A Southern Grove at Twilight 



The rambling ancestral mansion, deserted by the youth and joy and 
life of the old South, stands in silent solitude. Wild Cherokee roses 
twine tenderly around the crumbling pillars ; sombre-hued mocking 
birds and truly brown wrens circle about the high roof and make the 
stillness melodious with their mellow strains and trilling notes. The sun, 
sending its fading rays down the long, misty, oak-bordered avenue, 



128 The St. Mary's Muse. 



sheds a soft golden light over the quiet scene. Draped with mournful, 
flowing grey moss, tinted silver by the setting sun, as sentinels keeping 
guard over the deserted grove, the great trees rise. The sun sinks 
lower, the shadows lengthen ;. the air becomes filled with mystic, fairy 
chirpings and twitterings and with fragrant, intangible perfumes 
wafted into the silent freshness of evening. Deeper, and yet deeper, 
become the shadows, and the grove grows wondrous deep, and in the 
darkening sky, far, far above, the white stars peep out. The faint 
stirrings of innumerable wee creatures breathe through the warm, 
languid twilight; and the languishing south wind blows and gently 
sways the tired, nodding flowers. Serenely the giant trees brood on 
in calm sadness, while the breezes mysteriously murmur among their 
branches and softly wave the drooping, grey, Southern "banners." 

Fainter and fainter grows the lingering light ; a silvery lustre is 
shed over all by the crescent moon ; the drowsy flower-cups fall asleep in 
the "paleness and coolness of the night;" the birds cease their songs; 
all nature seems at rest, and the only sound that breaks the deep repose 
is the weirdly sweet call of the whippoorwill echoing from the fragrant 
depths of the nearby woods. 

"And whispered messages come down the wind, 
And whispered answers stir among the trees," 

as the gathering dusk, soft and kindly and strangely sweet, slowly 
wraps the grove in a hushed, peaceful silence. 

Paula E. Hazaed. 1910. 



A Darl^ey Monologue 



"Hit's de ole ship o' Zion, 
Hallelujah! 
Hit's de ole ship o' Zion, 

Hallelujah! 
She hab landed many — " 



"Lor, honey, hyah I is a bustin' my throat tryin' to sing yo' to sleep, 
an' yo' lookin' up at yo' Mammy jist as pert-like. I declah' to gracious, 
if yo' ain't de purtiest lil' gal to be a niggah, I eber did see. Yes, yo' 
is, honey, kase I hyard ole Missus say so de very first time you 



The St. Mary's Muse. 129 

opened dem big black eyes ob yourn. Lor, chile, hush dat cryin', 
ain't yo' neber gwine to sleep ?" 

"She hab landed many a thousan' 
And she'll land a many mo — o' 
Glory, glory! Hallelujah — " 

"Lor, Ephraim, what am yo' a standin' dah for, a-shiverin' and 
a-shakin' wid yo' eyes a-poppin' outen yo' head, like de ole 'Patrol- 
lers' wuz arter yo' ?" 

"War you say ? war % 

"Lor' have mercy on dis niggah — what am dem pesterin Yankees 
gwine to do nex' ? 

"Sot de niggahs free, yo' say ? AVhat am dey gwine to do when dey 
is sot free ? Dat's what I'm a-axin' yo' ! I'd jes like to know what 
you'd do turned outen dis cabin widout ole Massa to take care ob yo'. 
Answer me dat, Ephraim ! 

"Git to shufflin' you scared niggah — yo' ! Don' yo' know de Yankees 
am a-gwine to fight our white folks, an' ain't we's bleeged fer to hep 
ole Marsa some? Wake up dah, Elijah, an' yo' too, Jeremiah! Hyah, 
Break-o'-day, put on dat dress yo' lil' missy gib yo' Chris'mus. 
Ephraim, yo' git de gun hangin' up dah behin' de do', an' hed de per- 
cession. Now, is yo' all ready ? 

"When I counts three, ebery las' one of yo' sing — For-ard, march ! 

"Dixie Ian' am de Ian ob cotton, 
Cinnamon seed, an' a sandy bottom, 
Look away — ." 

Fannie Hikes Johnson. 1906. 



The Little Old Lady 



Can you ever forget your visits to the little old lady ? The dear lit- 
tle old lady ! You used to go very often in those days when you were 
a tiny girl. Her home was not very far from yours, so you could run 
in almost ever afternoon to see her. How glad you were when you 
found her at home! LTsually she was in the sitting room, her willow 
rocking-chair placed in the bay window, her tall two-story work- 
basket at her side. For the little old lady was always busy. 



130 . The St. Maey's Muse. 



How distinctly you can see her, in her quaint black dress with its 
basque, spreading skirt (for she still wore a hoop-skirt), and the crisp 
white cap that framed her dear face. The hair that peeped from 
under the cap was brown, for the little old lady was just a bit vain, 
and persisted in wearing a dark wig that she had first found becoming 
many years before. But the touch of vanity did not spoil her or her 
appearance. Hers was the sweetest old face in the world ; sweet and 
yet roguish, too, for the mouth often broke into a smile and the twink- 
ling eyes would join in expressing her merriment. 

If you found her sewing she would tell you wonderful stories of her 
far-away youth, perhaps of how when a wee girl she and her eight- 
year-old brother traveled from South Carolina to Connecticut alone; 
how they made the journey by boat and by stage-coach; or she would 
describe her great-grandmother and the various uncles and aunts with 
whom she had lived until her marriage. Once she told you of how 
she and her husband went to a play, how she was shocked at one of the 
actresses "carrying on" as if she were crazy and how "Mr. Frink" (the 
little old lady's husband) explained that the woman was only acting. 
The little old lady, however, did not seem convinced of her sanity, 
and perhaps harbored a suspicion of the wisdom of theatre-goers in 
general. 

When the story-telling was over and the little old lady saw that you 
were hungry- — and of course she could tell that by intuition — she 
would trip to the closet and get you jumbles or strawberry short-cake. 
For she prided herself on her cooking, and generally insisted on mak- 
ing the fancy dishes herself. 

You did not always find her sewing or occupied with house-work, 
however, for often she was reading a church paper or her little Testa- 
ment; the latter usually lay in her work-basket. When you came she 
would put the book aside and talk to you gently but seriously of good- 
ness and patience. Perhaps you would ask if you might go with her 
to church next Sunday. She was always pleased to be asked this, 
and on the following Sabbath would slip a few peppermint drops into 
her pocket in order to give them to you if the sermon was very long. 

When your visit was over, she would probably go with you to the 
front steps and would kiss you, saying, "My dear child, you have been 



The St. Mary's Muse. 131 



very good ; tell your mamma so, and ask her to let you come and spend 
the day with us very soon." And then you would run home. 

Yes, it is a long time since the little old lady last kissed you good- 
bye, and you, your childish heart filled with love, hugged the wee form 
and kissed the sweet face again and again. 

Serena Cobia Bailey. 1907. 



April Rain 



Sweet spring rain, soft spring rain, 
You tinkle gayly 'gainst the pane, 
Watering buds and dreaming flowers 
Wakening them to busy hours. 
Earthy-sweet is your warm breath, 
For you release from winter's death; 
Lightnings play with you, again 
You flash back sparkles, April rain. 

Gentle rain, inconstant rain, 

You weep and smile and weep again; 

You are like a maiden's tears — 

Hotly shed, till swift she veers 

To a bright and laughing mood, 

Light and dark her daily food, 

So are you. And when we plain 

Grant our tears no deeper pain 

Than yours and hers, sweet April rain. 

V. R. B. Pickel. 1910. 



IN LIGHTER VEIN 



Past and Present 

O, the brave old days of long ago! 

When chivalry was at its height; 

When men wore love-locks, plumes, and lace, 

And jeweled swords with hilts so bright; 

When gallants donned their baldrics bold 

For fierce bouts in the duel field, 

Their chief ambition e'en to fight 

Where'er there was a cause to right, 

In the brave old days of long ago. 



132 The St. Maby's Muse. 

O' woeful days of modern times! 

When fashion's rule is at its height; 

When maids wear bought locks, plumes, and lace, 

And hats so big and skirts so tight; 

When matrons leave their homes awry 

To woo fame in the suffrage field, 

Their chief ambition "woman's right," 

No matter what the chaotic plight, 

In these woeful days of modern times. 

Patsey H. Smith. 1912. 



Overheard in Senior Hall 



"For the love of Casey, I never saw such a room — where on earth 
are all of these things going, eh ?" 

"Well, for goodness sake, don't stand there staring with your mouth 
open — crawl under the bureau and get the hammer — Dummy ! take 
your foot out of that wash bowl ! Now look what you've done." 

"Well, what under the sun is the wash bowl doing in the middle 
of the .floor any way ?" 

"Oh ! for pity's sake, stop fussing, go borrow a tack or something; 
there isn't an earthly thing we need in this room, unless it's under the 
bureau, and nobody will fish it out." 

"Oh ! I could get under the bureau all right, but how on earth did 
the hammock ever hold you this summer — poor thing, I feel for it!" 

"Please let's stop fussing. We'll never get a thing done." 

"Well, who started it, I'd like to know V 

"There you go again: Look out! don't sit on that chair, my hat's 
underneath all those clothes. And how on earth did my bottle of 
Hudnutt's get in the trash basket? Where is my trunk going, please 
tell me — under the table or on top of the wardrobe ?" 

"Oh ! I don't know — eat it ! You worry me green." 

"You horrid creature I hate you !" 

"Praise Casey! We can't do another thing without a stepladder; 
please go see if you can find one." 



The St. Mary's Muse. 133 

"My land, didn't I go ask for a whiskbroom — and didn't I get 
looked at like I was a — a — a— an ossified potato ? You don't catch me 
over there again. Well, you are the limit; what on earth are you 
doing pulling all those things out of your trunk when this room is al- 
ready full up to the brim ?" 

"Oh, I forgot to wrap Jack up! I know he's cracked! I Jcnow 
he's cracked ! — He IS cracked ! ! !" 

"You talk like a clown! Who is Jack, any way? For the land's 
sake, get up off the floor and hush. I'm sure I can't help it if he's 
cracked. Where must I put this pennant ?" 

"Where' d you get that pennant, anyway? I never saw it before!" 

"Suitor,, child; suitor?" 

"There goes Peggy! Run call her quick I I know she's going down 
town, and she just must get me some things. Peggy, darling, don't 
try to back out of the room. I only want you to get just two or three 
little things for me. It wouldn't take you a second. I'll write 'em 
down for you : 

One curtain pole. 

One woolly rat. 

One waste paper basket. 

Hammer and tacks. 

Candy (10c store). 

Peanut butter and crackers. 

Alarm clock. 

That's all. They won't be much trouble, will they ? Only seven 
things ?" 

"Sakes alive, what do you take me for — a delivery wagon? I've a 
thousand things to get myself, thank you. ]STo, sir ! I'm gone. Good- 
bye. 

"I do think she might have done that little favor for me. I al- 
ways knew she was the most unaccommodating person that ever was. 
And just to think — she has never even paid me that stamp she owes 
me. Edith, what on earth are you doing under the bed ? I told you 
the scissors were over here behind the box-couch ! That reminds me — 
we've got to clean that old thing out." 



134 The St. Mary's Muse. 



"Say, child, don't let's clean up any more; we'll be too tired to lis- 
ten to the serenade to-night — fish out a hat pin and let's cut the cake. 
I do hope those boys will come over like they promised. It doesn't 
look like this room will ever get straight — but here's hoping." 



M. C. Shuford. 

Ida J. Rogerson. 1908. 



A Rhyme 



I sat and pondered hour by hour, 
"Oh, give me words, which I may use, 

To write a tale of love or power," 
I fervently besought my Muse. 

To tell a tale of heroes brave, 

(As bards of all the ages choose,) 
Who risked their all, some maid to save, 

Or simply something to amuse. 

At last my ardent prayer was heard, 
Words came to me by ones and twos — 

A tale of gallantry unheard 
Was published next month in the Muse. 

Helen Katherine Liddell. 



The St. Mary's Muse. 135 



EDITORIAL 



The Chapel 

It was the custom of Dr. Arnold, of Rugby, to begin the first exer- 
cise of his Sixth Form with a short prayer, over and above the ordi- 
nary morning prayer. He told the boys that his reason for so doing was 
to convey to them the thought that everyday work should be conse- 
crated, that school business itself chould be religious. Such a convic- 
tion as this of the great English headmaster was and is the feeling of 
the founder of St. Mary's and his successors, and it is for the impressing 
of this conviction upon each of us at St. Mary's that our Chapel stands. 
'Its office in our life to hold constantly before us the truth that religion 
is not a garment to be worn an hour or two on one day in the week, 
but a force to be active throughout the waking hours of every day. 
Therefore, it is the Chapel, through its services and its Rector's teach- 
ings, gives a certain unity to the varied phases and activities of our 
school life, emphasizing that the education which is of high worth is 
that which develops body, intellect, and spirit, each according to its 
place and power, so that she whose mind and heart are receptive may 
be led to strive for control over all faculties and to advance towards 
an ideal of healthy, happy, Christian womanhood. 

E. W. T. 1910. 



Loyalty 

What does loyalty really mean, in plain ordinary language and 
thought ! And what does loyalty to our Alma Mater mean to us ? Or 
what should it mean ? 

First, I think we should understand it. Understand what our Alma 
Mater tries to do for us and what it needs us to do for it. And we can 
do it easily if we only assume the proper attitude of mind. Then we 
ourselves will believe in St. Mary's, and of course if you believe in any- 
thing you are going to stand up for it. And by standing up for it I 
don't mean a blind and stubborn defense of everything and everybody 
existing up here as being perfect. That's absurd ! 



136 The St. Mary's Muse. 

Sometimes we will have to acknowledge ourselves as being quit* 
faulty, even if we are "St. Mary's girls," but then we can easily cal 
to mind the nice things we do, or the bad things we don't do, when 
some dear gossipy old, or middle aged, soul, on the outside looks as if 
she could pick a flaw if she tried ! 

So much for our wordy battles with fault-finders ; whether in town, 
out of town, or worst of all, on the grounds. 

]SText, I think a very important element in loyalty is support — mental 
moral, and physical S-u-p-p-p-o-r-t, with a capital S. All different kinds 
or organizations, businesses, and amusements in Schol have got to be 
run. They aren't machines and they won't go alone. And if every one 
of us don't do our part in supporting them, we will simply get to be 
deadbeats, and the Literary Societies, athletics, dances, or what not will 
either fade into nothingness, or absorb the personality of a few. Andi 
that's where the kick comes in. 

We are content to merely drift, and yet if the other fellow doesn't 
row the boat to our satisfaction — what do we do ? Take the oars ? 
Do we? Loyalty would do its share in the beginning and the boat 
would run smoothly — and so loyalty to Alma Mater would understand, 
believe, support, and act. Margaret Broadfoot. 1912. 



Sunset 



O glorious hour of sunset, 

You'll come to me again, 
When years have written on my brow 

Their tale of joy and pain. 
And I'll see dear old St. Mary's, 

And the Chapel in the light, 
As the golden glory floods the sky, 
And the sun sinks out of sight. 

The girls pour from the doorways 

In one continuous stream; 
Gay as the bridge to Asgard, 

They come into my dream; 
And like the pious Arab 

When called to prayer at night, 
I join the throng at Chapel 

As the sun sinks out of sight. 



The St. Mary's Muse. 137 

The organ's solemn pealing 

"Dear Lord, abide with me, 
For fast doth fall the eventide," 

Will oft appeal to me. 
While visions come to me at night, 
And I'll see the little Chapel 

As the sun sinks out of sight. 

And when life's day is ended. 

And the lessons all are done, 
May I feel the benediction 

That comes with the setting sun, 
When called to prayer at the Chapel. 

And may my faith grow bright 
As I offer my last evening prayer 

As the sun sinks out of sight. 

Anne Archbell. 1907. 



The Chapel 



The last Amen has sounded and out into the sunset come the 
girls in groups of two and threes. Reluctant just now to join in their 
merry chatter, and feeling a strange unaccountable longing to be alone, 
I step back into the shadow of the Chapel and watch the laughing 
couples go arm in arm down the broad walk. 

With the music of the evening hymn still in my mind, I turn and 
softly open the Chapel door and go in. How quiet and how still it is 
here. What long purple shadows the setting sun has cast across the 
floor. The chancel is bathed in a soft violet light tinged with gold. 

The sound of the girls' voices through the open window seem far 
away and hushed. So peaceful and so still is this little house of God. 

Stealing into one of the pews I sit close against the wall drinking 
in the quiet beauty of it all. How long I sit there I do not know; I 
seem to lose all thought of time and the moments slip away. 

Suddenly I am roused by the sound of the organ. Softly and 
wondrously the notes sound as though an unseen hand played upon the 
heart strings of memory itself. Then two by two through the open door 
shadowy forms begin to file slowly in. 

Girls with laughing faces, and girls demurely grave. Girls, girls, 
girls, everywhere until they fill the Chapel seat on seat. How queerly 
they are dressed, what strange little bonnets, and stiff full frocks. As 



138 The St. Mary's Muse. 

they file into the pew in front of rne I hear one whisper, "To-night, 
directly after the lights are out — don't forget." And I smile in sym- 
pathy. 

The music rises in volume until it fills the little Chapel and mingles 
sweetly with the girlish voices rising full and clear. Then all too soon 
the last Amen is sounded and once again the long procession marches 
slowly down the aisle. 

"Who— who are you?" I breathe in wonder as they pass and the 
answer comes whispered back to me through the stillness "We are the 
girls of '62." 

Gone ! and yet a new procession comes filing, filing through the open 
door. Girls, girls, girls, a long, long chain as the classes of the years 
come swiftly on. 

And through the shadows names are softly whispered, and of Lucy 
and of Mary, and of Margaret, I hear ; and then again of Lucile and of 
Minna and of Caroline and 1ST ell. 

I look and in the chancel where the dying day casts hues of violet 
and of purple and of gold, faces that once knew and blessed this chancel 
with their presence smile down upon the children they have loved. 

An endless chain ! The children's children come in and out again 
through the open door. White robed girlish figures, Commencement 
Days of years and years go by. Wbat sweet, fresh, untried faces! 
What girlhood dreams go out to meet and mingle with the noise 
and discord of the world. Yet hearing always amid the tumult the 
Chapel music rising sweet and clear. 

Of all that countless long procession passing slowly out into the night, 
I feel I know there is none there who does not return in spirit and in 
memory to the little Chapel and gain afresh an inspiration there. 

The mantle of the night has fallen, and I, too, turn toward the open 
door, but pause upon the threshold reluctant to depart. 

All is darkness save the chancel which glows with a mellow light, a 
peace divine. The soft hushed notes of the organ sound a benediction 
to the Chapel, and to the girls who have and who will for ages worship 
here. 

"May the blessings of God Almighty" — the sweet hushed notes are 
saying — "Be amongst you and remain with you always, Saint Mary's 
Chapel." Cabrie Weight VanBueen ('99). 1911. 



The St. Mary's Muse. 

Subscription Price ' One Dollar. 

Single Copies Fifteen Cents. 

A Magazine published monthly except in July and August at St. Mary's School, Raleigh, N. C, 
in the interest of the students and Alumme, under the editorial management of the Muse Club. 
Address all communications and send all subscriptions to 

THE ST. MARY'S MUSE, 
Correspondence from friends solicited. Raleigh, N. C. 

EDITORIAL STAFF 1914-1915. 

Margaret Huntington Bottum, Editor-in-Chief. 
Senior Reporters 
Helene Carlton Northcott Sadie Walton Vinson 

Matilda Jordan Hancock Courtney Deforest Crowther 

Junior Reporters 
Eliza Dickinson Davis Mart Auning Floyd Annie Sutton Cameron 

Pencie Creect Warren, '15, Business Manager 
Fannie Marie Stallings, '16, Assistant Business Manager 



Program for the Seventy-third Commencement, 1915 

May 22, 8:15 p.m. Saturday. Annual Recital of the Elocution Department in 

the Auditorium. "The Comedy of Errors." 
May 23, 11:00 a. m. Sunday. Annual Sermon in the Chapel by the Rt. Rev. 
Albion W. Knight, D.D., Vice-Chancellor of the University 
of the South. 
5:00 p.m. Alumnae Service in the Chapel. 
May 24, 11:00 a. m. Monday. Class Day Exercises in the Grove. 

4:00 p. m. Annual Meeting of the Alumnae Association in the Parlor. 
5:00 p.m. Annual Exhibit of the Art Department in the Art Studio. 
8:30 p. m. Annual Concert of the Music Department in the Auditorium. 
9:45 p.m. Rector's Reception in honor of the Graduating Class in the 
Parlor. 
May 25, 11:00 a. m. Tuesday. Graduating Exercises in the Auditorium. 
12:30 p.m. Final Exercises in the Chapel. 



140 



The St. Mary's Muse. 



April 22, 8 

April 24, 8 

April 26, 3 

8 

April 27, 8 

April 29, 5 
April 30, 8 

May 1, 5 
8 
May 3, 8 
May 4, 3 
8 
May 5, 8 
May 8, 8 
May 11,8 
May 12. 
May 13. 

7: 

1: 

3: 

4: 

May 15. 8 : 

May 17, 8 : 

May 18-20. 

May 20-22. 

May 23-25. 



April-May Program 



30. Thursday. Concert of the St. Cecilia Club in the Auditorium. 

Direction of Mr. Owen. 
15. Saturday. Elocution Department Evening. Direction of Miss 

Davis. Benefit of The Muse. 
00. Monday. Field Day Contests. Direction of Miss Barton. 
00. Certificate Recital in Piano. Mary Auning Floyd. 
30. Tuesday, United Offering Missionary Slides in the Auditorium. 

Direction of Mrs. Cheshire. 
00. Thursday. Children's operetta. Direction of Miss Shull. 
00. Friday. "The Servant in the House." Chautauqua. 
00. Saturday. May Pole Exercises in the Grove. 
00. Junior-Senior Party in Muse Room. 
30. Monday. "The Yellow Jacket." Coburn Players. 
30. Tuesday. "The Imaginary Sick Man." Coburn Players. 
30. "Macbeth." Coburn Players. 

00. Wednesday. Song Recital. Alice Nielsen. Chautauqua. 
00. Saturday School Party in the Parlor 

00. Monday. Certificate Recital in Piano. Hattie May Lasater. 
Tuesday. Alumnae Day — 73d Anniversary of Opening 
Wednesday. Ascention Day. School Holiday. Alumnae Day 
Exercises. 
50 and 12: 45. Ascension Day Services. 
30. Alumnae Luncheon. 
30. Special Gymnasium Exhibition. 
30. Children's Concert in the Auditorium. 
30. Saturday. Annual Recital of the Chorus. 
00. Monday. Piano Recital. Adelyn Andrews Barbee. 

Senior Examination. 

Regular Final Examinations. 

Commencement Program. 



Read! Mark! Act! 



The Editors wish to call the especial attention of the St. Mary's girls and the 
readers of The Muse generally to the advertisements inserted here. It is a good 
principle to patronize those that help you. Let the advertisers see that it pays 
them to advertise in The Muse, and make those who do not advertise realize that 
it is their loss, not ours. 



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Candy, China, Toys 
Pictures, Stationery 



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ALUMNAE NUMBERS OP THE MUSE 

(1) April, 1906: Alumnae Number. 

(2) December, 1906: Founders' Day Number. 

(3) June, 1908: Alumnae Day Number. 

(4) June, 1909: Clement Memorial Number. 

(5) April, 1910: Aldert Smedes Memorial Number. 

(6) November, 1910: Aldert Smedes Centennial Number. 



Why Is 

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the 

MOST POPULAR? 

Ask the Girls 



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The Greatest Store 
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Advertisements 



Stationery — College Linen 
Cameras and Supplies 
Waterman's Ideal Fountain Pens 

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The Office Stationery Co. 

Bell Phone 135 RALEIGH, N. C. 


CAROLINA POWER & LIGHT COMPANY 

Electric Light and 
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174— BOTH PHONES— 226 


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The Muse is the official organ of the Alumnae, adopted, 
by the Association, May, 1910. 

If the Alumnae would more freely write to the Muse, the 
Muse could give better Alumnae news. 



Jolly & Wynne Jewelry Co. 

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128 Fayetteville St. Raleigh, N. C. 


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Ladies' Fine Shoes 


HELLER'S SHOE STORE 
SHOES AND HOSIERY 


JOHNSON & McCULLERS COMPANY 
Good Things to Eat 

122 FAYETTEVILLE STREET 



Advertisements 



S. GLASS The Ladies' Store 

Everything up-to-date for Ladies, Misses 

and Children. Ready-made wearing apparel 

210 Fayetteville St. Raleigh, N. C. 


KING-CROWELL'S DRUG STORE 
AND SODA FOUNTAIN 


SHOES! WHOSE? 
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Insure Against Loss by Fire 

Best Companies Represented. Bonding Solicited 

The Mechanics Sayings Bank 

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Advertisements 



HIGH GRADE TOILET ARTICLES 
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Phones 228 


WHITE ICE CREAM CO. 

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Typewriters of all Kinds Repaired. 


ICE CREAM 
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ONE-PRICE MUSIC HOUSE 




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12 W. Hargett St. 


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ROUTE OF THE "NIGHT EXPRESS" 



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Suits, Dresses, Coats, Etc, 

Tailoring and Dressmaking 

SPECIAL PRICES 


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Hardware, Paints, House Furnishings 

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ELLINGTON'S ART STORE 

RALEIGH, N. C. 
Evervthing in Art. 
Embroidery Materials, Wools and Zephyrs. 




MISSES REESE & COMPANY 
MILLINERY 


SOUVENIRS OF ST. MARY'S 
The Toyland Co. 




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Picture Frames and Window Shades. 


Harness and Saddle Horses. Heavy Hauling 

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Phone 529 



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RICHMOND MARKET 

Meats of All Kinds 

Raleigh, N. C. 


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104 E. HARGETT ST. 


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Ladies'and Gentlemen's Dry Cleaning Establishment 

Caedwell, & O'Kblly, Proprietors 
204 S. Salisbury St. 


Calumet Tea and Coffee Company 

51 and 53 Franklin St. Chicago, III 
Proprietors of Calumet Coffee and Spice Mills 


HAYES & HALL— STUDIO 


PERRY'S ART STORE 

S. Wilmington St. 


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Fancy fruits and pure ice cream. Best equipped and most 
sanitary ice cream factory in the state. Our cream is the 
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Store, 111 Fayetteville St., Vurnakes &. Co., Props., Raleigh. 


J. R. FERRALL & CO. 
GROCERS 



Location Central for the Carolinas. 

Climate Healthy and Salubrious. * 

St. Mary's School 

RALEIGH, N. C. 

(for girls and young women) 

74th ANNUAL SESSION BEGINS SEPTEMBER 15, 1915. 



SESSION DIVIDED INTO TWO TERMS. 

EASTER TERM BEGAN FEBRUARY 19, 1915. 



1. THE COLLEGE. 
St. Mary's \ 2. THE MUSIC SCHOOL, 

offers instruction in these J g. THE BUSINESS SCHOOL. 

U THE ART SCHOOL. 
5. THE PREPARATORY SCHOOL 



In 1914-15 are enrolled 275 students from 16 Dioceses. 

Twenty-eight Members of the Faculty. 

Well Furnished, Progressive Music Department. Much Equipment New. 
Thirty-six Pianos. New Gymnasium, Dining Hall and 
Dormitories. 
Special attention to the Social and Christian side of Education without 
slight to the Scholastic training. 
For Catalogue and other information address 

Rev. George W. Lay, 
Rector. 



t fflattf* JBuse 



, 1915 




^recommencement JJumfcer 



^aleigfj, Ji C 



Program for the Seventy-third Commencement, 1915 



May 22, 8:15 p.m. Saturday. Annual Recital of the Elocution Department ir 

the Auditorium. "The Comedy of Errors." 

May 23, 11:00 a.m. Sunday. Annual Sermon in the Chapel by the Rt. Rev 

, Albion W. Knight, D.D., Vice-Chancellor of the University 

of the South. 

5:00 p.m. Alumnae Service in the Chapel. 

May 24, 11:00 a. m. Monday. Class Day Exercises in the Grove. 

4:00 p. m. Annual Meeting of the Alumnae Association in the Parlor 
5:00 p.m. Annual Exhibit of the Art Department in the Art Studio. 
8:30 p. m. Annual Concert of the Music Department in the Auditorium. 
9:45 p.m. Rector's Reception in honor of the Graduating Class in the 
Parlor. 
May 25, 11:00 a.m. Tuesday. Graduating Exercises in the Auditorium. 
12:30 p.m. Final Exercises in the Chapel. 



Alnja Mater 

(Tune: "Believe Me, If All Those Endearing Young Charms") 

St. Mary's! wherever thy daughters may be 

They love they high praises to sing, 
And tell of thy beauties of campus and tree 

Around which sweet memories cling; 
They may wander afar, out of reach of thy name, 

Afar, out of sight of thy grove, 
But the thought of St. Mary's aye kindles a flame 

Of sweet recollections and love. 

Beloved St. Mary's! how great is our debt! 

Thou hast cared for thy daughters full well; 
They can never thy happy instructions forget, 

Nor fail of thy virtues to tell. 
The love that they feel is a heritage pure; 

An experience wholesome and sweet. 
Through fast rolling years it will grow and endure; 

Be a lamp and a guide to their feet. 

May the future unite all the good of thy past 

With the best that new knowledge can bring. 
Ever onward and upward thy course! To the last 

Be thou steadfast in every good thing. 
Generations to come may thy fair daughters still 

Fondly think on thy halls and thy grove 
And carry thy teachings — o'er woodland and hill — 

Of earnestness, wisdom, and love. H. E. H., 1905. 



' 



The St. Mary's Muse. 

PRE-COMMENCEMENT NUMBER 



Vol. XIX. May, 1915. No. 11. 



Good Bye, School, We're Through! 

(A Song of Graduation Day.) 
(After "Good Bye, Girls," from "Chin Chin.") 



We're the happiest girls in all the realm of schooldom, 

We feel as though we'd triumphed over fate, 
We've reached a goal we've ever sought, 
A day of which we've ever thought, 

That wondrous day on which we graduate. 
Of course we've not had only sun and flowers, 

But storms and clouds have braced us in the line, 
Like every other girl we've wasted hours, 

But now all's done — the future looks benign. 
And yet we say with heartfelt sigh 
For the happy days of the years gone by: 

Good-bye, School, we're through, 

Dear School, where we have met, 
We say good-bye to you 

With very real regret. 
Our day of jubilation 
Is full of fascination, 

But we'll e'er to you be true; ( 
Good-bye, School, 

Good-bye, School, we're through. 

We've often read in poems and romances 

That some day in some way, if we but wait, 
The thing we seek both far and wide — 
The thing for which we've ever sighed — 

Will come to us — 'tis so decreed by fate. 
And so it's all come true as in a story, 

Commencement morning with its golden sun 
Has risen upon our sight in all its glory, 

For us there'll never be such other one. 
And yet we say with heartfelt sigh 
For the happy days of the years gone by: 

Good-bye, School, we're through, etc. 



142 The St. Mary's Muse. 



The Two Races of School Girls" 

(With apologies to Charles Lamb.) 



The specimen of living anatomy, which constitute the species called 
school girls, is, so far as I know, divided into two great races : the girls, 
who with money, do not pay their debts, and those who with that most 
undesirable possession, pay them. There are those who paint, and those 
who do not, those who dance, and those who do not, those who are thin, 
and those who are fat, those who are industrious, and (oh, would you 
believe it) those who are not, but standing distinctly out and above all 
these are the two great races, the debtors and nondebtors. By careful 
study, and close analysis, the conclusion has been arrived at that the 
former are by far the superior race. 

They do not pay because they have no money. They frankly hope to 
pay some day, and incurred their honest debt in that hope. "Blessed 
is the man who has forgetfulness, for his conscience shall rest." It is 
far beneath their dignity, and their good credit to pay these debts on 
the installment plan, in piecemeal fashion, with the small pin money 
they occasionally obtain, while still waiting for the Big Check. 

They have a smile for all, and are as "Hail fellow well met," with 
their persistent collectors as with their Pythians. Why should they 
shun them? They bear no malice for them. They instill in them as 
much confidence of their credit, as they themselves have. On the fearful 
Monday mornings they do not have tremblingly to dress behind locked 
doors, in fervent hope that they may skip out down town before the 
collectors find them, then having made good their escape [being bur- 
dened with too scrupulous a conscience] return home with the necessary 
amount. 

Oh, unhappy are these less blessed. They join in Cicero's lamenta- 
tion, Quod utinam minus vitae ciqndi fuissemus. They continually 
count their wrongs. They unceasingly bemoan the less beautiful things 
which were not bought with the money, now departed in peace. They 
bear a personal malice against the innocent people who approach them 
with their duns. They avoid them as lepers. Can their doting parents, 
adoring fathers, furnishers of the checks and the true payers of the 
bills, realize the great degeneration they are forcing on their dear off- 



The St. Mary's Muse. 143 



spring by this thoughtlessly too much liberality. A lost imagination 
(for how wonderful are the tales told to the accumulators, manufac- 
tured out of the elastic and ever improving brains of the nonrecipro- 
cants), an inimical attitude, and a grudging disposition are the fatal 
results. 

"Well do I remember when T — n, the aspiring yet doggedly deter- 
mined young collector, after encountering three grudging payers, knocked 
savagely at the door of happy B. What to T — n's surprise was a gra- 
cious welcome. A luxurious rocker was pointed to with the Saturday 
Evening Post B. was reading, and a box of peanut brittle was gener- 
ously pushed forward. When I dropped in two hours later, there still 
sat (with growing admiration) the astonished young aspirant. She had 
heard spell bound a whole summer's adventure of the reckless B. and 
finally left, only after having made an engagement to go to church with 
her on the following Sunday. How, may I ask, does B. compare with 
her stupid pay-as-you-go room-mate, who with growing anger, had stood 
in the closet the whole two hours, for having hidden from the aforesaid 
collector of coin, was ashamed openly to denounce her movement, and 
lacked the ingenuity to make up a suitable excuse for her retirement. 
Then, after staying in the grumps two days, she payed her debt, eased 
her conscience, but gained nothing. 

Therefore, Reader, if ye be the powers which control the purse strings 
of some trusting darling, I exhort you to withhold, with sagacious 
wisdom that fatal, evil promoter, that ready change, for sufficient unto 
the day is the evil thereof. Unknowingly, how much more does thy 
dear offspring enjoy the $5 which is coming than the $1 which comes. 
Two birds in a bush sing far sweeter than one in a cage. Withhold 
then thy good impulse, the almighty check, which represents wonderful 
speculations, paid debts, delicious ingredients, and charmed aircastles. 

Katharine Wimberley Bourne, '16. 



144 The St. Mary's Muse. 



A Modern Fairy Story 



In justice to the "other person's side of the affair," I feel it my duty 
to relate the true facts concerning this oft-repeated story; facts which 
have only recently been discovered. When this story originated people 
were only too ready to believe that strange coincidences or events were 
ordered by some supernatural power— whereas people of today ascribe 
them at once to Providence or Fate or some such abstract force. This, 
then, is the modern version of the story : 

Cindy wasn't black, as the name might imply — oh no ! quite the op- 
posite. Perhaps the Reader will be enlightened when I say that her 
whole name was Cinderella. 

A very beautiful girl was Cinderella, as beautiful as her sisters were 
ugly; and being the youngest and the object of her sister's "envy, 
hatred, malice and all uncharitableness," she was obliged to work in the 
kitchen, among the pots and pans. But this, instead of marring her 
loveliness, only increased it. Her curly hair grew prettier every day 
— in great contrast with the electrically curled locks of her sisters; her 
figure was slender and supple from the constant wielding of the broom 
and her hands of dazzling whiteness from washing so many dishes. 
How different was she from her sisters ! And how envy gnawed at their 
hearts ! 

The life of this family was enlivened one day by an invitation — a 
most welcome one — to a large ball, in fact this ball could be called the 
foremost event of the social year. Of course, great preparations were 
made of which we have neither time nor space to relate here, but at 
last the great night arrived, the sisters adorned themselves in their 
new gowns, patiently aided by Cinderella, and after much powdering 
and primping, declared themselves ready. They walked grandly into 
their limousine, each ugly sister hoping, in her heart of hearts, that 
hers would be the greatest social success of the evening. Reader, can 
you not see that this is really no fairy story, after all ? 

Cinderella, wistfully listening to the sound of the departing wheels, 
was suddenly aware of an idea : Why should not she go to the ball too ? 
Acting upon impulse, she hurried to her sisters' room to begin her 
preparations, for facts show that she wore a gown of her sister's instead 



The St. Mary's Muse. 145 



of one of fairy fabric. The sisters had so many that it was never 
noticed. In a short time she stood transformed from a kitchen maid 
to a princess, for indeed her sister's latest "Lucile" gown fitted quite 
well. She found it necessary, however, to borrow some slippers from 
a neighbor. 

Arrived at the ball, she became at once very popular. A handsome 
man — fit partner for the princess — had requested the honor of the next 
dance. But alas ! Cinderella knew not the steps of the fox trot and 
while trying desperately to follow, lost one of her slippers and in her 
ignominy — fled. It was well that she did for the hour was growing late. 
The Prince, picking up the slipper, determined at once, to find the 
owner. Had he known that it was a borrowed one, he might perhaps 
have been discouraged in his search ; because, Header this is a modern 
Prince, not one of the dauntless type of former days. 

Providence, the kindhearted, seeing how tangled these poor human 
affairs had become, decided to take a hand in the game. The next day, 
Cinderella, sleepy-eyed but happy, was busily engaged in the kitchen, 
when the door opened and in walked — the Prince. Putting the gro- 
ceries down, he turned to go when he saw Cinderella and stopped, 
aghast. The recognition was mutual, as was the joy which quickly 
followed; but the Prince being of a practical mind must needs fit the 
slipper on her, as established proof. 

So Reader, my story comes to an end. As has probably been sur- 
mised, this couple married and lived happily ever after, although the 
hero was only a grocer and the heroine a maid. 

Arlene Chester, '17. 



'The Misspelled Word" 



The last week of May found "Hiclor" girls in the joyous whirl of 
commencement — but it also found them — and this any one of experience 
would scarcely term joyous— in the midst of exams. Just at present 
the general topic of conversation hinged on the valedictory. Page 
Nelson and Jean Bowling led the Senior Class, but their general aver- 
ages were so close that it was impossible to determine which of the 
two girls should have the highest honor; finally the faculty decided 



146 The St. Maey's Muse. 



to have each one prepared to deliver the valedictory, and let their 
examination marks determine the outcome. 

It was the evening after exams when the girls, tired and worn out 
from the strain of the day, had gone to their rooms, that Elizabeth 
Boyall was suddenly interrupted by a loud knock at her door and the 
tearful entreaty of — "Beth ! this is Page — let me in quick !" 

The girl's imperative tone and distressed voice caused Elizabeth some 
alarm which was greatly increased at sight of the girl herself. 

"Page ]STelson, what has happened ?" 

Safe in Elizabeth's room with the door locked Page threw herself on 
the bed and gave way to a flood of tears, sobbing out a few broken 
words. 

"JSTow look here Page, stop crying like that and tell me what it is 
all about ; you're just working yourself into a dreadful condition." 

Under the influence of the girl beside her Page gradually stopped 
sobbing sufficiently to make herself understood. 

"Well this is the way it was, a few minutes ago Miss Stevens sent 
for me — you know I take Erench under her — and said she wished to 
speak to me privately. When I got in there she looked terribly solemn 
and asked me if I would be willing to sign a pledge stating that the 
examination paper that I had handed in that morning was altogether 
and entirely my own work. The question almost knocked me down, but 
of course I answered 'yes.' I had hardly gotten the word out of my 
mouth when she turned like a flash and handing me a torn piece of 
paper asked : 

"Then what is that doing in your examination book? It is in your 
handwriting and is evidence of your asking for and obtaining help on 
your examination." 

"Page, there must be some mistake — what was written on the paper? 
was it really your handwriting ?" 

"It was a piece of scratch pad with the words — 'What is the French 
for development?' and below was written the answer 'developpement.' 
Oh the writing was enough like mine all right, but no less than twenty 
girls here in school write very much as I do. Beth, child, do you 
realize what it means? USTo valedictory, no salutatory, no anything!" 



The St. Mary's Muse. 147 



"Page, I think just the fact that you have been accused of cheating 
is a great deal worse than losing the valedictory ; it just makes my blood 
boil to even think of your having been suspected. But there is no use 
of wasting time talking; something has got to be done and done 
quickly." 

Elizabeth, although the calmer of the two, seemed to appreciate more 
fully the ignominy of the situation. After several minutes thinking 
she asked — 

"When did you hand in your paper? at the end of the first hour?" 

"]STo, you see I was sitting away at the back of the room — (another 
point against me) — and so when I finished I just gave my paper to one 
of the girls to carry up to the desk." 

"One of the girls ? Who ?" 

The girl's manner was all anxiety, and her eyes had an intense ex- 
pression. 

"Goodness Beth, don't look like that ! The girl was Jean Bowling — 
she's perfectly harmless, besides, she's trying as hard as I am for the — " 

"Are you sure you gave it to Jean?" 

"Why yes, of course." 

"Well then, I have a direct evidence that Jean did not hand in any 
paper until the last bell because we went together. If she laid your 
paper down in the mean time why Miss Stevens can't prove that you 
put that piece of paper there or even that it is yours. Look here, I 
want a look at that scrap — Stevie'll let me see it I know. You go 
dress now for dinner and don't worry, sweetheart, it will come out all 
right." 

******** 

That night as the Lady Principal was seated in her office Elizabeth 
Boyall entered and asked to speak to her. 

"As you know, Miss Lawrence, Page Nelson has been accused of 
cheating today, and it is in connection with this matter that I want to 
see you tonight." 

"Unless you have evidence to the contrary, Miss Royall, I should 
say Page was not only accused but convicted of cheating ; every circum- 
stance points that way — but go on, I will be glad to hear what you have 
to say." 



148 The St. Maby's Mtjse. 



The girls never knew what to expect from Miss Lawrence ; she was a 
clever, capable woman, but abrupt in speech and manner. Her abrupt- 
ness, however, did not bother Elizabeth; on the contrary, it made her 
more deliberate. 

"Before I say anything further it is absolutely necessary that I tell 
you whom I suspect of this treachery — in my mind there is no doubt as 
to Jean Bowling's having written that piece of paper." 

"That is a very bold statement to make." 

"But one which I can follow up with facts. This morning Page 
Nelson did not hand in her own paper— she gave it to Jean Bowling; 
Jean acknowledged her having done so. I saw Jean hand in both 
papers long after Page had left the room; now Jean and Page write 
something alike — here are samples of their writing — old English 
themes. 

"Miss Stevens let me see the writing on the paper this evening and I 
have brought it to you; as you see, the writing could belong to either 
girl, but there is something queer about this paper — look, the word 
'development' is misspelled. You will pardon me for suggesting it, but 
my advice would be to have each of them come up here and write this 
sentence for you." 

"And if they spell it alike?" 

There was a slight curl of her lips as the Lady Principal bent for- 
ward — 

"The evidence is then no good. But — " the girl's entire frame shook 
with emotion — "But if one of them misspells the word — " 

"The other — " Miss Lawrence rose slowly from her seat — "the other 
will be valedictorian. Your plan, Miss Boyall, is a good one; it will 
prevent any open disgrace for either girl here their last few days; you 
of course will not speak of it. Kindly stand back of that curtain while 
I send for the girls." 

"Miss Nelson," the Lady Principal motioned Page to her chair at the 
desk— "Kindly write with pen and ink as I dictate: 'What is the 
French for development ?' Thank you, you are excused." 

"Miss Bowling," — there was only a short wait between the two girls' 
summonings — "Kindly write in pen and ink as I dictate: 'What is the 
French for development ?' That is enough — you may go." 




The Daisy Chain 




Reading the Class History 
Scenes of Class Day 



The St. Mary's Muse. 149 



As the door closed Miss Lawrence called to Elizabeth. 
"Come, here are the two papers." 

Elizabeth glanced anxiously at the two writings. Jean Bowling had 
written the word "development." 

Josephine Wilson, '16. 



Autobiography of an Umbrella 



As I had just received an invitation to a masquerade ball for the 
following evening and had not time to prepare a new costume, I decided 
to make the old attic a call. I felt sure that I might find there some 
discarded gown which I could very easily remodel. After ascending 
the flight of steps, my attention was attracted by an old trunk in which 
I thought I might find something of service. As I started to open it, 
I discovered that it was laden with useless goods which I Avas to remove. 
In my haste I hurled them aside but was frightened by an almost silent 
groan which arose from the heap. What do you suppose I found there ? 
— an old umbrella which had toiled earnestly until old age had seized 
him in its wrinkled hand and had left him there to pine away. 

I addressed him, "Oh, poor, poor creature, what is your trouble, have 
I injured you in any way ?" He raised his silken folds all tattered and 
torn and began to wipe the teardrops from his eyes, and murmured be- 
tween sobs, "I am lonely here, my health is broken, and I have no one 
to cheer me." Questioning him further, I found that he was born in 
Chicago and, as he stated, raised everywhere. I forgot myself in my 
anxiety and insisted that he tell me his history in full. On second 
thought I feared that I was too severe in making him recount his 
sorrows and imprint them afresh in his memory. Nevertheless he did 
not hesitate and began his doleful story thus : 

As I have aforesaid, I first saw the light in Chicago, in one of those 
enormous umbrella factories where billions of umbrellas are born every 
year. As umbrellas are born full grown, they at once dressed me in a 
new black silk suit of the latest Parisian style. Although I am 
hideously ugly, this pretty suit made me look fairly well, and I thought 
that I might yet make for myself a reputation in later life. 



150 The St. Mary's Muse. 



Together with eleven of my brothers, I was packed away in a box 
and sent on a long trip to New York. This was the most hazardous 
journey of my life. The box in which we were confined was pushed 
around, turned over and over, and treated in every disrespectful way. 
In fact, on one of these occasions I had a rib dislocated. Nevertheless 
I was ever gay thinking that the best was yet to come. 

When we arrived in New York, we were at once carried to a large 
clothing store. There we were placed in a very pretty window which 
was filled with all kinds of beautiful things. 

We realized only too well that we were sooner or later to part, and 
that these strange beings who passed by outside would probably be our 
new masters. We used to have quite a few friendly discussions among 
ourselves as to whom we should like most to serve. Among the most 
frequent of our admirers was a beautiful young girl, who seemed to take 
an especial interest in us. 

Finally, one day she came into the store and asked to see some of the 
nicest umbrellas that were for sale. The salesman led her over to our 
window, and took us out one by one. At first she was undecided for I 
must say it was a very respectable lot. But finally she chose my blue silk 
brother, and as she was carrying him off he turned around, and with 
tears in his steel blue eyes, bade us good-bye. 

One rainy day a young gentleman came, into the store and without 
much ado bought me. This of course made me feel as though it were 
not so much admiration for me as the inclement weather that I was 
indebted to for my purchase. 

On the way to my new master's home, some one called him and gave 
him a small sweet scented envelope. It was for Mr. J. Winthrop, 5th 
Avenue, New York. We soon reached his father's mansion, where he 
went upstairs and I was carelessly thrown behind a door with a crowd of 
ugly, sickly things that had been umbrellas. At first these offcasts 
were inclined to question me, but as I gave them no answer they soon 
ceased. 

About eight o'clock my master came, and taking me up started out into 
the darkness. It was a dreadful night and the rain was falling in tor- 
rents. In a few minutes he reached a handsome mansion and went in 
while I was again left behind the door. To my utter surprise, whom 



The St. Maey's Muse. 151 



should I find there but my blue silk brother. But this happy meeting 
was soon ended by the arrival of our respective owners. I was again 
separated from my brother, but this time I was the ear witness of a very, 
very friendly conversation. 

We soon reached a house where everybody seemed to be making merry. 
My master graciously placed me upon a brazen throne near a handsome 
hall stand. This time I happened to be the witness of a very amusing 
incident which, however, ended tragically for me. My master's friend 
happened to be left alone with a handsome young man. This young 
man asked her a question which I did not hear, but which, however, I 
have reason to believe was very pointed. She replied that she was 
engaged to Mr. Winthrop. This reply seemed to disconcert the young 
man somewhat, and without uttering another word he departed in my 
company. 

After almost tearing my poor body to pieces against the ground he 
reached his home. This time I was carelessly left on the porch for my 
new master had not yet recovered from the wound inflicted by Cupid's 
dart and was not thinking of me. Since my last journey had given me 
a severe headache, I could not rest. I seemed to move among a world 
of ghosts. All manner of inanimate objects seemed to jeer and taunt 
me. My mind was in a whirl. I thought that I could hear my master 
and mistress rushing through the house as though it were on fire. I 
could not speak nor utter a groan for it was all a dream. 

But when I awoke, my, what a dilemma I was in ! I found myself 
in the firm grasp of some vile wretch who had quietly slipped into the 
piazza and was bearing me secretly away into the outer darkness. He 
took me thinking that I might serve him in a strait. After an hour's 
journey he reached his little home and placed me behind the door, for it 
seemed that all my master's were especially desirous that I should make 
that my place of abode. My joy was unbounded when I was set free 
to breathe once more the cool and refreshing air. 

The next morning I overheard my new master's wife questioning him 
about being out so late the preceding night. Not receiving a favorable 
answer and thinking it her duty as a wife to know all concerning her 
husband, she took me up and running up to him began to belabor him 
furiously. He at once left the house but it was too late. I found out 
there as Solomon said that a woman's anger overcometh much. 



152 The St. Maey's Muse. 



I was in a critical physical condition. Dr. Motoe, the specialist on 
Physical Ailments of Umbrellas happened to be in town. Having de- 
livered a lecture on the Mental Disorders of Umbrellas, he was secured 
to attend to my case. After a most skillful diagnosis he declared me to 
be beyond recovery and that I would never be a strong umbrella again. 
JSTow after my useful career you see where I finally rest." 

For a moment profound silence held its sway. After listening to 
this pathetic story I could scarcely realize the truth that it had revealed. 
How the poor umbrella had refrained from tears as long as he could 
and he began to sob bitterly. My heart melted in sympathy for him. 
I could not think. Suddenly, almost as in a vision, the uses to which 
I might put this umbrella appeared. I considered it a bright idea, and 
bade the umbrella cease crying and listen to me. I said, "If you desire 
I will take your silk cover and use the best portions, mixing them with 
some brilliant colors, to make a slumber robe that shall be used only on 
special occasions and I will have your crown gilded and present it to 
my uncle that he may use it for his cane." The smile that glittered on 
his tear-stained face was as the sunshine after rain. He said that he was 
not worthy of so much kindness but only wished to have my presence in 
his hours of solitude. I insisted and he thanked me for listening so 
anxiously to his burdensome story and more so for proposing a way to 
secure for him enjoyment. For now he was not to perish but to live. 

Eva Peele, '18. 



The Legend of the Arbutus 



In a moonlit glade of the forest, the little flower fairies had crept 
forth from their tightly closed buds to have a dance while the crickets 
and the grasshoppers fiddled for them, their tiny green feet twinkled 
among the dew drops, and their many-colored petals shimmered like a 
kaleidoscope in the soft light of the moon. Why were they so joyful? 
I will tell you. Spring was coming — was coming tomorrow, and "the 
Rainbow fairy had been down with her magic paint-box, and tinted all 
the flowers with radiant hues. Yet, not all ; for even as Lily tosses her 
stately head in self-assured pride, and Snowdrops utter a low peal of joy 



The St. Mary's Muse. 153 



from her silvery bell, little Arbutus, over on one side, with her head on 
the soft earth, is weeping bitterly. Alas, little flower, she has no fairy 
robe with which to greet spring, but only a dull ash-gray garment; for 
the busy Rainbow fairy quite overlooked the modest little Arbutus, 
hidden under the moss and leaves, and she was far too shy to attract the 
fairy's attention. 

As she sobbed on, oblivious to all around her, a sympathetic little 
moonbeam spied her, and crept over to find out the trouble. He was 
indeed a most chivalrous moonbeam, and became quite indignant at 
the mistreatment of this appealing little Cinderella. 

"Come with me, little Arbutus, and I will carry you all over the world 
until we find the most beautiful dress in existence." 

He took her over the mountains where the gnomes were forging their 
golden amulets. He led her across the plains where the little prairie 
dogs were holding councils of state. He wafted her over the ocean 
where the phosphorous sprites were skipping over the foamy crests 
of the waves. He floated with her among the clouds where the stars 
winked cheerily as they passed. On and on they went, seeking for the 
wonderful dress, until finally they stood at the gates of the palace of 
Dawn, and Aurora came out to meet them. 

"Have you no costume to give this tiny flower — a costume fit to greet 
the spirit of spring herself ?" asked the courteous moonbeam. 

Then Aurora smiled, and as she smiled, the first pink flush of dawn 
crept into the midnight sky. 

"Little fairy, attire yourself in this fleecy cloud, and I will color it 
for you with the first tint of the early morning." 

Then, the next day, when spring in her pale green beauty came to 
inspect the flowers, she looked at the flaring Tulip and shook her head. 
She looked at the pale Lily, the vivid Rose, the dainty Mignonette, the 
glowing Daffodil, and the perfumed Hyacinth, she looked all around the 
vari-colored circle, and again she shook her head. At last, over in the 
corner, pushed aside by a self-assertive Crocus, she saw the sweetest 
flower of all, the rose-pink Arbutus. 

"Little flower," she said in her clear voice, "little flower in the first 
pink blush of the dawn, I choose you to be my messenger, and bring to 



154 The St. Mary's Muse. 



all mortals who have the love to seek you out the first tidings that 
Spring has come to dwell in the land." 

And, still hidden under the moss and leaves, faithful little Arbutus 
keeps her tryst with those who have hearts and eyes open for tokens of 
Spring. 

Eliza D. Davis, '16. 



SCHOOL NOTES 



St. Cecilia Club Concert 

The first private concert of the St. Cecilia Club was given in the St. 
Mary's Auditorium on Thursday evening, April 22d. Mr. Owen, the 
founder and director of the club, deserves much credit for the excellent 
work and success of the club. 

Mrs. Dowell's singing of the hundred and thirty-seventh Psalm 
(Liszt) was splendid, the sweetness of her voice charming the audience. 
The chorus in "Night" by Saint-Saens showed excellent ensemble work 
and was ably assisted by Miss Shull's solo obligato. The violin numbers 
given by Miss Abbott and the group of songs by Mr. King were very 
attractive, while the "Dutch Lullaby" (Nevin) sung by Mesdames Owen 
and Thiem, Miss Marshall, and Messrs. Foreman and Bonner delighted 
everyone. The chorus was well assisted by Miss Phillips, accompanist. 

M. A. F., '16. 

PRELUDE. 
Invocation to St. Cecilia Victor Harris 

I 

Entrance of the Gods in Walhalla Richard Wagner from Rheingold 

(&) Serenade Richard Strauss — Arranged by Victor Harris 

(c) The Two Clocks James Rogers 

II 

(a) Prseludium and Allegro Pugnani-Kreisler 

(&) Indian Lament Dvorak-Kreisler 

( c) Tambourin Chinois Kreisler 

Miss Muriel Abbott. 



The St. Mary's Muse. 155 

III 

A Dutch Lullaby Ethelbert Nevin 

"Wynkeu" 
"Blynken" 
"and Nod" 

Mesdames R. Blinn Owen, LeRoy Thiem; Miss Susie Marshall; 
Messrs. H. C. Foreman, J. Bonner. 

IV 

Night Camille Saint-Saens 

Solo obligato — Miss Zona Shull. 
Violin obligato — Miss Muriel Abbott. 

V 

(a) Requiem Sidney Homer 

(&) When Roses Bloom Louise Reichardt 

(c) The Pipes of Pan Edward Elgar 

Mr. J. J. King. 
Intermission. 

PART SECOND. 
I 

The 137th Psalm — Cantata with Soprano Solo Franz Liszt 

Mrs. Horace Dowell. 

Violin: Miss Muriel Abbott. 

II 

By the Beautiful Blue Danube Johann Strauss 

Arabesques on Motifs Arranged by Max Spicker 

Recital of Expression Pupils 

Saturday evening, April 24th, at 8 :30, the private pupils in expression 
presented a one^act farce entitled "My Lord in Livery." As a curtain 
raiser to this Miss Davis, the Director of Expression gave a charming 
Japanese monologue, "Cherry Blossoms," in which she showed true 
dramatic talent and held the intense interest of the audience until the 
almost tragic end. 

The parts in the play, "My Lord in Livery," were well taken, and the 
stage business was excellent. Haffye Barton as Sybil, Adele Stigler as 
Spiggott and Annabelle Converse as Laura were especially good. 

The cast was as follows : E. D. D. 



156 The St. Mary's Muse. 



CHARACTERS. 

Lord Thirlmere (H. M. S. Phlegethon) Marjorie Hill 

Spiggott (an old family butler) Adele Stigler 

Hopkins (a footman) Katherine Stewart 

Annette (the maid) Agnes Gotten Timberlake 

Sybil Amberly (daughter of Sir John Amber ly) Haffye Barton 

Laura ) . (Annabelle Converse 

„ f Her friends < . __. ., 

Rose J [Anna White 



Certificate Recital— Mary Auning Floyd 

On the evening of April 26th at 8 :30 o'clock, Mary Floyd, a certificate 
pupil of Mr. E,. Blinn Owen's, gave the first recital of the Commence- 
ment season, assisted by Miss Frances Tillotson, soprano. 

In the first number, "Sonata Tragica," by McDowell, Mary Floyd 
showed excellent interpretation and played with fine depth of tone. The 
otheff selections following were all very much enjoyed, especially 
"Romance" by Foote, in which the singing, sweetness of touch showed 
to good advantage, also in the artistically performed "Parfum Exo- 
tique" of Hendriks and the Mendelssohn "Capricioso" which was played 
with whimsical caprice and ease. 

Frances Tillotson has an exceedingly lovely, flexible voice and sang 
with ease and artistic taste. The "Wind Song," by Mr. Owen, she was 
obliged to repeat. 

The recital was a great success, showing talent and promise in both 
pianist and singer. E. C, '15. 

PROGRAM 

I. Sonata Tragica Op. 45 MacDowell 

Largo Maestoso. 
II. Venezice e Napoli: Gondoliera Liszt 

III. Aria from Roberto il Diavolo Meyerbeer 

Miss Frances Tillotson. 

IV. (a) Pierrette — Air de Ballet Chaminade 

(&) Romance, Op. 15. No. 3 Foote 

(c) Parfum Exotique Hendriks 

From Dances Esthetique. 

V. (a) April's Here Ronald 

( & ) Rose Softly Blowing Spohr 

(c) Wind Song Owen 

Miss Frances Tillotson. 

"VI. Rondo Capricioso Mendelssohn 



The St. Mary's Muse. 157 



Junior-Senior Party 

Oil Saturday evening, May 1st, the Seniors were most delightfully 
entertained by the Juniors in the Muse Room. The guests were greeted 
by the Junior Class in a receiving line which was headed by Mary Floyd 
their president. Places were then shown them at the beautifully ar- 
ranged table where as favors they found tiny baskets of mints tied with 
tulle and a spray of lilies-of-the-valley. The decorating scheme used 
throughout was a combination of pale pink, blue and green colors, in 
honor of May Day. 

It is impossible to describe with credit all the features of the evening. 
Aside from the delicious courses served, there were songs with guitar 
accompaniment, some about the Faculty, some about the Seniors and 
others, concluded with "Goodbye School, We're Through !" 

Effective toasts were made by Miss Thomas, Miss Katie, Mr. Stone 
and the Class Presidents. 

Other attractive features of the evening were the reading of the Class 
Prophecy illustrated by cartoons by means of a refiectoscope, followed 
by a series of "baby pictures" of the Seniors which the Juniors had 
ingeniously and secretly obtained from the parents. 

The whole party showed much originality on the part of the Juniors, 
aided by Mr. Cruikshank. Miss Lillian Fenner, Miss Stiles and Edith 
Holmes were responsible for the carrying out of the delicious menu. 

In behalf of the Seniors, who could not express in words their pleasure 
and enjoyment of the evening, let us add that never was a Senior Class 
more royally treated nor more appreciative of the efforts of their succes- 
sors, the Class of Nineteen Sixteen. M. H. B., '15. 

The School Party 

On Saturday evening, May 8, 1915, the Senior Class gave the fourth 
of the annual School Parties. The School Party originated with the 
Class of 1915 in its freshman year and each year since the custom has 
been observed. It is an occasion for the purpose of emphasizing the 
class spirit and our love and devotion to our Alma Mater. 

At eight o'clock each class in costumes of the class colors marched 
into the parlor which was beautifully decorated with crepe paper rib- 



158 The St. Mast's Muse. 



bons and roses. The Preps in their dainty sunbonnets were quite a 
contrast to the Seniors in their caps and gowns. 

An interesting program was carried out consisting of songs, speeches 
and toasts. Each class president made a short address which was fol- 
lowed by the class song and the Seniors sang many topical songs. 

A picture of Miss Katie was presented to the School by the classes and 
was graciously accepted by Mr. Lay. It is an especial honor for us to 
be the ones to leave this picture of our most beloved St. Mary's friend 
who has not only taught but also be<m a dear friend to many of our 
mothers and other relatives who attended St. Mary's in past years. 

We leave the pleasure of giving the School Party to the future Senior 
Classes and hope that they will develop and carry the plan still further, 
enjoying planning and carrying it out as much as we, the girls of 1915, 
have in our years at St. Mary's. S. W. V., '15. 



ATHLETICS 



With the events of field day held Friday afternoon, May 30th, we 
close one of the most prosperous and eventful seasons in athletics in 
the history of St. Mary's. With enthusiastic leaders, both Sigmas and 
Mus under the guidance of Miss Barton have worked with vim in 
tennis, basketball and in field day contests. 

In tennis and in field work the contests were hot and the Mus won 
by close scores but in basketball fate was decidedly against the Sigmas 
and both the first and second Mu teams were victorious. This defeat of 
the Sigmas only makes the prospects for the coming year more interest- 
ing for both sides, for having been successful many years in the past the 
Sigmas have a fight before them into which they will throw their best 
efforts to regain their lost reputation. M. H. B. 

Field Day 

On April 30th, at three forty-five, the girls assembled out on the 
basketball court to take part in the several athletic contests. It was held 
between the Mu and Sigma athletic clubs, but the chief interest was 



The St. Mary's Muse. 159 



in determining the champion athlete of the school. This honor was 
won by Lillias Shepherd. 

The first event, a running broad jump was won by Elspeth Askew 
with a record of 13 feet 1 inch; Lillias Shepherd second with a record 
of 11 feet 11 inches. The three-legged race followed, won by Lillias 
Shepherd and Augusta Crawford, with Harriet Barber and Nancy Lay 
second. Then came the running high jump in which Ellen Mott and 
Elspeth Askew tied for first place, jumping 3 feet 10 inches, each. The 
next event was a standing broad jump won by Estelle Ravenel with a 
record of 6 feet 5 inches, Lillias Shepherd came second with a record 
of 6 feet 2 inches. The last event was a 45-yard dash, in which Annie 
Cameron came first, Lillias Shepherd, second; Elspeth Askew, third. 

Of the total score the Mus won 278 points and the Sigmas 195 points. 
Lillias Shepherd, Mu, won the highest score of individual points, 52 2-3 ; 
Elspeth Askew, Mu, second, 51 1-3, and Annie Cameron, Sigma, third, 
49 1-6. 

Those who attended found the contest very exciting and interesting. 

E. D. D., '16. 



The St. Mary's Muse. 

Subscription Price ----...,,,', One Dollar. 

Single Copies Fifteen Cents. 



A Magazine published monthly except in July and August at St. Mary's School, Raleigh, N. G. 
in the interest of the students and Alumna, under the editorial management of the Muse Club. 
Address all communications and send all subscriptions to 

THE ST. MARY'S MUSE, 
Correspondence from friends solicited. Raleigh, N. G. 

EDITORIAL STAFF 1914-1915. 

Margaret Huntington Bottum, Editor-in-Chief. 
Senior Reporters 
Helene Carlton Northcott Sadie Walton Vinson 

Matilda Jordan Hancock Courtney DeForest Crowther 

Junior Reporters 
Eliza Dickinson Davis Mart Auning Floyd Annie Sutton Cameron 

Pencie Creecy Warren, '15, Business Manager 
Fannie Marie Stallings, '16, Assistant Business Manager 



EDITORIAL 



"Farewell, Happy Year" 

Whether we have been at St. Mary's four years or only one it is with 
a feeling of sadness that we see the session draw to a close. It means to 
us all partings from friends we hold most dear, to many, a last farewell 
to the school that has meant so much to us in our happy school days at 
St. Mary's. 

We girls of the Class of 1915 leave our Alma Mater with a feeling of 
the deepest appreciation of all our faithful friends among both Faculty 
and girls for all they have meant to us in our many happy days to- 
gether. 

During the years in the world beyond St. Mary's we shall hold our 
School most dear and work for her greatest good at every opportunity 
which is offered us, however great or small. 

Our Excbanges 

We acknowledge with pleasure the following magazines : 
Wofford College Journal, the Folio, Wake Forest Student, the Tat- 
tler, the Monthly Chronicle, Western Maryland College Monthly, the 
Carolinian, Mary Baldwin Miscellany, Maroon and Gray, the Florida 
Flambeau, High School Gazette, the Wesleyan, Vail Dean Budget, the 
Focus, State Normal Magazine, the Lenoirian. 



The St. Mart's Muse. 161 



ENTERTAINMENTS FOR THE SENIORS 



May 5: Florence Store's Party 

Florence Stone was at home to the Senior Class on Wednesday even- 
ing, May 5th. 

The guests were cordially welcomed at the door hy the hostess and 
served a delightful fruit punch in the hall before entering the parlor. 
There delicious refreshments were served by Annie Cameron and Ellen 
Mott. The rooms were artistically decorated with roses and each guest 
wore one away as a souvenir of a most enjoyable afternoon. 

May II: Elizabetb Lay's Party 

On Tuesday afternoon, May 11th, Elizabeth Lay entertained the 
Seniors at the Rectory. 

Each guest was requested to bring a "white elephant," which was 
labeled with a number when brought. Delightful punch was served be- 
fore the guests assembled on the porch when they drew the numbers and 
received some one else's "white elephant." Much amusement was af- 
forded by the chagrin and consternation of several of the Class on 
receiving a gift only too well known on Senior Hall. 

Delicious strawberry shortcake was then served and Agnes Barton 
was the fortunate one to find the wedding ring in her cake to the envy 
of the others. Beautiful roses were given the guests on departing as a 
remembrance of a delightful afternoon. 



PRE-COMMENCEMENT RECITALS 



May 10: Piano Recital of Miss Hattie Mae Lasater 

The second Pupil's Certificate Recital of the season was that of 
Hattie Mae Lasater. The News and Observer said of this recital : 

The certificate piano recital given by Miss Hattie May Lasater at St. 
Mary's School Monday evening was an occasion of much pleasure to the large 
audience who enjoyed the program. Each number was not only rendered with 
a finish and ease that showed careful training and perfect technique, but with 
an artistic feeling that showed Miss Lasater to be a real musician. She is 
completing her study of music which was begun under Miss Dowd. In her 



162 The St. Mary's Muse. 



absence from the school this year she will receive her certificate from Miss 
Nelly Phillips. 

Miss Lasater was perhaps at her best in the last number, the Grieg Carni- 
val. The variety of selections called for a variety of feeling on the part of 
the young pianist which she was quick to respond to. Assisting her was 
Miss Zona Shull, soprano. Miss Shull is always heard with much pleasure. 

The program was : j 

Concerto Hummel 

Allegro moderate n 

Les Lyhainz Chaminade 

Hungarian Dance Brahms 

Canzonetta Schutt 

Warum Schumann 

Aufschwung Schumann 

III. 

a. The Spirit Flower Campbell-Tipton 

b. The Leaves and the Wind Leoni 

c. The Nightingale Luders 

Miss Shuix 

IV. 
Aus dem Carneval Grieg 

May 13: Piano Recital of Miss Adelyn Barbee 

The first Pupil's Recital of the season was that of Miss Barbee, pupil 
of Mr. Owen. The News and Ohserver said : 

Talent of real promise was revealed in Miss Adelyn Barbee, who gave the 
third piano recital at St. Mary's School last night. She gave a musical and 
intelligent reading of the first movement of the Haydn Concerto in D. Her 
Schumann number was most artistic and her Debussy number, although very 
modern, was full of daintiness and charm. 

She was formerly a pupil of Miss Dowd's, but has studied with Mr. Owen. 
Mr. Owen, who thinks that she has a future before her, is to select a master 
in New York for her next year. 

Miss Barbee was assisted by Miss Margaret Thomas, contralto, who re- 
vealed unusual powers of interpretation, when she sang two French songs, the 
Habanera from Carmen and the Gavotte from Mignon. 

This little lady possesses a voice of resonance and color and sings with 
beauty of tone and of phrasing. 

This was the program : 

1. Concerto in D. Op. 21 Joseph Haydn 

Vacace 

2. (a) Rondo-Gavotte, from "Mignon" Ambrose Thomas 

(b) Habanera, from "Carmen" Georges Bizet 

Miss Margaret Thomas 



The St. Mary's Muse. 163 



3. Papillons Robert Schumann 

Introduction 

Nos. 1, 2, 3, 4 and Finale 

4. (a) Aria, from the "Morning of the Year" Charles Wakefield Cadman 

(b) Sing a Song of Roses Fay Foster 

(c) Although Landon Ronald 

Miss Margaret Thomas 

5. (a) Venetienne, 4th Barcarolle Benjamine Godard 

(b) Waltz in E minor Frederic Francois Chopin 

(c) Deux Arabesque Claude Debussy 

(d) Eagle Edward MacDowell 

May 15: Annual Recital of tfoe Chorus 

The Annual Concert of the Chorus, under the direction of Mr. Owen 
was, as usual, a great success. Of it the News and Observer said: 

The students of the Voice Department of St. Mary's were heard last night 
in a most delightful concert. The soloists were Misses Anna Belle King, 
Frances Tillotson, Margaret Thomas, Violet Bray, Adele Stigler, and Messrs. 
Godfrey Cheshire, J. S. Bonner, and H. C. Foreman. 

Decided talent was evidenced by the young people who took part. In the 
beautiful duet from Martha, a duet seldom heard, most artistic work was 
done by the two young men who gave the number, Mr. Bonner and Mr. Fore- 
man. Mr. Bonner has a rich baritone, while Mr. Foreman has an unusually 
fine tenor, and takes his high tones without effort. Miss Tillotson sang with 
beauty of tone and of phrasing. Her second song was a composition by the 
talented head of the music department, Mr. Blinn Owen, and was received 
with enthusiastic appreciation. 

Miss Margaret Thomas, of Durham, has a dramatic contralto and sings 
with ease. She has, moreover, an exceedingly pleasing stage presence. 

Mr. Godfrey Cheshire, basso, delighted the audience with his Mozart number. 

The chorus demonstrated the results of careful training combined with 
natural ability. Mr. Blinn Owen, with his thorough knowledge of music, his 
enthusiasm and ability as a teacher, is giving St. Mary's much musical 
prominence. 

He is the director of the voice department and, in the chorus work, is ably 
assisted by Miss Zona Shull in voice and Miss Martha Roberts at the piano. 

This was the program : Part I 

1. (a) Song of a Shepherd Fox 

(b) The Three Fair Maids Viardot 

(c) Tuscan Folk Song Caracciolo 

Chorus. 

2. "Air" from Magic Flute Wolfgang Amadeus Mozart 

Mr. Godfrey Cheshire 

3. "The Seasons," waltz song McFadyen 

Miss Frances Geitner 



164 The St. Mary's Muse. 

4. Every Flower, from Madam Butterfly Giovana Puccini 

Miss Adele Stigxek Miss Anna Belle King 

Miss Violet Bkay 

5. Goodnight Haynes 

Miss Anna Belle King 

6. The Evening Hour Mary Helen Brown 

Chorus. 

Part II. 

1. "Nymphs and Fauns" Herman Bemberg 

Chorus. 

2. (a) "I Hear a Thrush at Eve" Chas. Wakefield Cadman 

(b) "An Irish Mother's Song" Margaret Ruthven Lang 

Miss Margaret Thomas 

3. Duette from Act I, Martha Friedrich von Flotow 

Mr. H. C. Foreman Mr. J. S. Bonner 

4. (a) "Rose Softly Blooming" Louis Spohr 

(b) "Wind Song" R. Blinn Owen 

Miss Frances Tillotson 

5. "Finale," Trio from Faust Charles Francois Gounod 

Miss Zona Shull 
Mr. H. C. Foreman Mr. J. S. Bonner 

6. "The Gypsies" Brahms-Shelley 

Chorus. 




The Impersonators of the Class Prophecy 




The Prophecy 
Scenes of Class Day 



ALUMN AE MATTERS 

Communications and Correspondence Solicited. 

St. Mary's Alumnse Association. 
Honorary President - - - Mrs. Mary Iredell, Raleigh. 

tt ir t>„„ „„ / Mrs. I. McK. Pittinger, Raleigh. 

Honorary Vice-Presidents - { Mpa Beaaie Smedes l e ; ki We | t Durham . 

President - Mrs. Herbert W. Jackson, Richmond, Va. 

Vice-President - Mrs. A. S. Pendleton, Raleigh. 

Secretary - Miss Kate McKimmon, St. Mary's. 

Treasurer - Mrs. Ernest Cruikshank, Raleigh. 



TY)e Rector's Letter to tfoe fllumnae 



May 8, 1915. 

The body of the Alumnae of any institution can be, and ought to be, 
of the greatest value to it. I have always appreciated very highly the 
work that the Alumnae have done for St. Mary's, and have been anxious 
that more Alumnae should join in this work, and that they should do it 
even more intelligently and efficiently than they have done. For this 
reason I have from time to time written some suggestions for the Muse, 
and I do this again at this time. 

The main object before a loyal alumna of St. Mary's should be to keep 
informed about the work being carried on at the school so as to be able 
to inform others, and multiply the interest in the school among all kinds 
of people. 

In the first place all Alumnae should, if possible, join a Chapter of 
the Alumnae Association, and if there is none in the town where they 
live and there is a reasonably large number of Alumnae a Chapter 
should at once be formed. 

These Alumnae Chapters should meet as frequently as possible so as 
to get to know each other and have the benefit of a feeling of solidarity. 
At these meetings they should take every means of learning about the 
history of the school, but above all in learning about the work that is 
being done there at the present time, and the aims and desires of those 
conducting the affairs of the school. To this end, whenever possible, 
the Rector or some one else from the school, should be given the oppor- 
tunity of meeting the Alumnae. 

All Alumnae should, as far as possible, subscribe to the Muse, which 
only costs a dollar a year, and should thus keep in touch with the life 



166 The St. Mary's Muse. 



of the school. At the meetings of the Chapters someone could call 
attention particularly to the various points of interest in what has been 
going on in the school, and what is planned for the future. 

Those living at the school of course are better informed about what 
is going on there than people outside, and unfortunately many stories 
go the rounds about the school which are not founded on facts. Further 
those responsible for the conduct of the school naturally look on certain 
matters from a different standpoint from those outside who have no 
responsibility, and are not in a position to know the reasons for certain 
regulations, methods and aims. It is extremely important that the 
members of the Alumnae should try to find out the exact facts when they 
hear stories that do not seem to be creditable to the school, or that they 
do not understand, that they should write to the Rector and give him 
the opportunity of correcting facts that have been misunderstood, or of 
explaining others which need explanation. Some rumor entirely with- 
out foundation occasionally gets repeated to hundreds of Alumnae and 
others before anyone thinks to ascertain whether the rumor is founded 
on facts. This does much harm to the school and is a matter easily 
corrected by loyal and careful Alumnae. Every Alumna of St. Mary's 
should be able to express the truth about the School, and also to correct 
at once any mistakes. Frequent correspondence with the school is the 
only method by which these ends can be attained. 

The Alumnae individually and collectively can do much good to the 
school by recommending it to prospective students. To do this consci- 
entiously requires something more than the knowledge of the glories 
of the past, and requires a careful and accurate knowledge about what is 
being done now, and what is being planned for the future. 

St. Mary's has a debt of about $45,000.00, and also needs to continue 
to put up new buildings and keep abreast of the times in every way. It 
should be carefully noted that the object of the Chapters of the Alumnae 
is not to raise money except in so far as some small dues to the Chapter 
may be necessary. At the same time the members of the Alumnae often 
have opportunities of calling attention of generous people to the needs 
of the school so as to open the way for an appeal later, or perhaps even 
to obtain some generous gift, and especially they have the opportunity 
of suggesting to various ones the advisability of remembering the school 
in their wills. "What the school needs at present is not so much the 



The St. Mary's Muse. 167 



founding of scholarships, which do not help the school to meet its obli- 
gations, but to obtain means for the discharge of the debt, and for the 
continuance of permanent improvements. 

It is very important that any suggestions that may occur to the 
Alumnae, or any criticisms of anything that is done at the school or 
planned for the future, should be communicated to the Kector. Such 
criticisms are very suggestive and often useful. 

On the other hand I feel that we at the school here know what things 
are important, and can weigh the suggestions of others and determine 
what is at the present time opportune and desirable. It is therefore 
very important that the Alumnae Chapters should not take up one or 
more plans of their own motion to the exclusion of the carefully thought 
out plans that are being promoted at the school. In order for the 
school to succeed there must be a definite policy carefully thought out 
with the benefit of all possible criticisms and suggestions. Any such 
policy when formed must receive the cordial cooperation and backing of 
all the Alumnae of the school if success is to be obtained. 

Another most important thing is that the Alumnae who are known 
to the school should send to the Rector the names of any Alumnae 
whose addresses are not at present preserved at the school. He ought 
to have a full list of Alumnae, and this is especially difficult as the 
change of name incident to marriage makes it impossible to keep track 
even of those who have been here recently, while a very large proportion 
of the older Alumnae are not known with their addresses to the authori- 
ties at the school. 

I shall always be glad to meet the Alumnae in various places when- 
ever it is possible to arrange a meeting, but I do not think such meet- 
ings should be postponed on account of the impossibility of having a 
full meeting. It would be worth while for me to spend an hour in 
talking about the school to only five or six persons. 

Assuring all the Alumnae of the School of my joining with them most 
heartily in love and loyalty to this grand old institution of the Church, 
and of my appreciation of their help in so many ways, I remain, 

Yours very faithfully, 

GrEOEGE W. LAY, 

Rector. 



Read! Mark! Act! 



The Editors wish to call the especial attention of the St. Mary's girls and the 
readers of The Muse generally to the advertisements inserted here. It is a good 
principle to patronize those that help you. Let the advertisers see that it pays 
them to advertise in The Muse, and make those who do not advertise realize that 
it is their loss, not ours. 



ESTABLISHED 1858 



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Advertisements 



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and Misses Ready-to-Wear Garments 

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THOMAS A PARTIN COMPANY 

Raleigh, N. C. 

Specialty of Ladies' Ready-to-Wear Gar- 
ments and Gossard's Lace Front Corsets 

JOHNSON & JOHNSON CO. 

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Pictures, Stationery 



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THE RISING BELL. 
(A Parody.) 
To rise or not to rise, that is the question, 
Whether 'tis nobler at dawning to obey 
The clangs and clashes of that rising bell 
Or to take manfully our sea of troubles 
And by fair excuses end them? To sleep, to sleep 
No more; and by this sleep we surely do begin 
The heartaches and thousand natural shocks 
That flesh is heir to; 'tis a laziness 
Never to be desired — to sleep and sleep; 
To sleep: perchance to be restricted, there's the rub; 
For from that confiscated sleep the punishments that come must give us 

pause, 
When we shamefacedly to Miss Thomas creep 
They become sad truth; there's the restriction 
That makes calamity of so long a sleep. C. deF. C, '15. 



Why Is 

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the 

MOST POPULAR? 

Ask the Girls 



BOYLAN-PEARGE 

COMPANY 

The Greatest Store 
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Advertisements 



Stationery — College Linen 
Cameras and Supplies 
Waterman's Ideal Fountain Pens 

JAMES E.THIEM 

The Office Stationery Co. 

Bell Phone 135 RALEIGH, N. C. 


CAROLINA POWER & LIGHT COMPANY 

Electric Light and 
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174— BOTH PHONES— 226 


THE SOUTHERN EDUCATIONAL BUREAU 

RALEIGH, N. C. 

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CONSERVATIVE AND CONFIDENTIAL. 


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H. STEINMETZ— FLORIST 

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128 Fayetteville St. 



Raleigh, N. C. 



HELLER'S SHOE STORE 
SHOES AND HOSIERY 



WALK-OVER— The Shoe for You 
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RALEIGH, N. C. 



HERBERT ROSENTHAL 

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JOHNSON & McCULLERS COMPANY 
Good Things to Eat 

122 FAYETTEVILLE STREET 



Advertisements 



S. GLASS The Ladies' Store 

Everything up-to-date for Ladies, Misses 

and Children. Ready-made wearing apparel 

210 Fayetteville St. Raleigh, N. 0. 


KING-CROWELL'S DRUG STORE 
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R. S. BUSBEE, Secretary 


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Steam Fitters 

Hot Water Heating 

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HUNTER-RAND COMPANY 

Dry Goods, Notions, Suits, Millinery 
and Shoes 

208 Fayetteville St. RALEIGH, N. C. 



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Junk Dealer: "Yes; get on the scales." — Ex. 

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Adveetisements 



HIGH GRADE TOILET ARTICLES 
THE WAKE DRUG STORE 

Phones 228 


WHITE ICE CREAM CO. 

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Typewriters of all Kinds Repaired. 


ICE CREAM 
Phone 123 


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CORNER SALISBURY AND HARGETT STS. 


ONE-PRICE MUSIC HOUSE 




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12 W. Hargett St. 


T. W. BLAKE, Raleigh, N. c. 

RICH JEWELRY MAIL ORDERS SOLICITED 






RALEIGH FLORAL CO. 

CHOICE CUT FLOWERS 


REGINALD HAMLET DRUG STORE 

Saunders Street 


Raleigh French Dry Cleaning 1 Company 

Corner Blount and Morgan Streets. 


HICKS' UPTOWN DRUG STORE 


HOTEL GIERSCH 

RALEIGH, N. C. 


Phone 107 
PROMPT DELIVERY 



Customer: "See here, waiter; I found a button in the salad." 
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Advertisements 



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206-210 Masonic Temple 

Suits, Dresses, Coats, Etc. 

Tailoring and Dressmaking 

SPECIAL PRICES 

Thos. H. Briggs & Sons, Raleigh, N. C. 

Hardware, Paints, House Furnishings 

and Stoves. We endeavor to give a 

faithful service and value. 

SOUVENIRS OF ST. MARY'S 
The Toyland Co. 



Harness and Saddle Horses. Heavy Hauling 

CARVER'S STABLES 

Henry S. Carver, Prop. Both Phones 229 

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118 E. Davie St. RALEIGH, N. C. 

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Embroidery Materials, "Wools and Zephyrs. 

MISSES REESE & COMPANY 
MILLINERY 

WATSON PICTURE AND ART CO. 

Picture Frames and Window Shades. 

ROYSTER'S CANDY A SPECIALTY 

Made Fresh Every Day 

Call OLIVE'S BAGGAGE TRANSFER 

Phone 529 



"If the ruler of Rewssia is the Czar, what are his children?" 
"I don't know." 
"Czardines." — Ex. 



C. D. ARTHUR City Market 
FISH AND OYSTERS 


L. SCHWARTZ 


MOORE'S ELECTRIC SHOE SHOP 

104 E. HARGETT ST. 


RICHMOND MARKET 

Meats of All Kinds 


JOHN C. DREWRY 
"MUTUAL LIFE INSURANCE" 


Raleigh, N. C. 


ladies'and Gentlemen's Dry Cleaning Establishment 

Cardwell & O'Kklly, Proprietors 
204 S. Salisbury St. 


Calumet Tea and Coffee Company 

51 and 53 Franklin St. Chicago, 111. 
Proprietors of Calumet Coffee and Spice Mills. 


HAYES & HALL— STUDIO 


PERRY'S ART STORE 

S. Wilmington St. 


California Fruit Store, 111 Fayetteville St., Raleigh 

Fancy fniits and pure ice cream. Best equipped and most 
sanitary ice cream factory in the state. Our cream is the 
"Quality Kind." Send us your orders. California Fruit 
Store, lil Fayetteville St., Vuruakes & Co., Props., Raleigh. 


J. R. FERRALL & CO. 
GROCERS